Job Hunter Follow Up Year Two: Cristy Moran

Cristy Moran

 

Cristy Moran took the Job Hunter’s survey on January 4, 2013.

Her responses appeared as There is a “Black Hole” of Information After One Drops a Resume.

We last followed up with her on December 9, 2013.
What’s your current work situation?

I am working full-time in a paraprofessional role at a college library.

What’s your prediction for the next step in your career?

I don’t know what I predict will happen, but I’ve begun applying for librarian positions in local colleges and universities. I promised myself that, if by the end of 2014, I didn’t see any real movement in my applications to local positions, then I’d start expanding my job search. In that sense, I predict I’ll be taking job hunting quite seriously in 2015.

What’s your ideal work situation?

The goal is to work professionally as a librarian in an academic library. I’ve had a lot of difficulty engaging my professional interests because I’m, technically, in a paraprofessional position at my institution.

Your Job Hunt

When did you start your current job hunt?

I started looking again at the first anniversary of my current job. A position opened up at my institution that I was interested in applying for, so I applied. Since then, I’ve been seeking similar opportunities.

In your job hunt, approximately how many positions have you applied to? How many interviews have you gone on?

I’ve applied to no less than seven positions in the last three months. I was interviewed for one and was one of the final candidates, but the job went to someone with more experience. My application has been rejected for another position that I was very well suited for and that my particular experience qualified me for. I haven’t heard from any of the other positions at all.

State of the Job Market

What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve seen on a job announcement?

I don’t know if I think it’s “ridiculous” but I am bothered that so many job announcements don’t provide a salary range or even a position type/ HR code so that potential applicants can discover salary ranges for themselves.

Your Perspectives

Would you change your answer to “what’s the secret to getting hired”?

I don’t believe there’s a single answer. I don’t think there’s a secret. There’s probably not even a common denominator that any applicant can address. For whatever reason, plenty of wonderful candidates with matching qualifications, desired experience, glowing recommendations, and great personalities don’t even get past applying for a position. They do everything “right.” Yet, they don’t get a call-back. They don’t even get rejection emails. They just stall in application limbo. The only thing they can do is keep being good at what they do now. They can continue acquiring work experience, continue gathering glowing recommendations, and not let disappointment and frustration ruin their good attitudes. Then, they need to keep applying. Because, if there is one thing that ensures one will not get the job it’s not applying for it.

Do you have any advice for job hunters and/or library school students?

Librarianship, in my opinion, is a vocational calling. It’s not something one does for the money or because they just “ended up” with their job. If either of those things is true for you, then it’s going to be an unhappy life of employment and it’s a disservice to the community the library serves and to the library community at-large. Based on that, my advice is simple: If it’s not your calling, then don’t bother looking at it for a paycheck.

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Job Hunter Follow Up: Cristy Moran

This post originally appeared on December 9, 2013. This year’s follow up with Ms. Moran will post shortly.
Cristy MoranCristy Moran took the Job Hunter’s survey on January 4, 2013.  Her responses appeared as There is a “Black Hole” of Information After One Drops a Resume.

Your Background

How long has it been since you got your library degree?

I received my MLIS in August 2012.

How many years of library work experience do you have?

Not counting my fieldwork semester, just over a year.

How many years of work experience outside of libraries do you have?

I worked full-time as a full-time student since my freshman year of college. What I consider my professional career – in education programming and management, and since – I’ve been working in since 2005.

How old are you?

32!

Your Job Hunt

How long did it take you before you found your job?

I was asked to apply to my current job and I did. The hiring process was purposely short and between applying and starting my position under a month had passed.

How many positions did you apply to?

I had searched sporadically for a library job while I had been securely employed and seeking my MLIS. However, when I got laid off from a job as Director of Education at a national tutoring company in February 2012, I applied to every possible job for which I was qualified. I had to file for unemployment and kept a spreadsheet of applications. I applied to over 200 library and non-library jobs combined between February 2012 and May 2013.

How many interviews did you go on?

I had several phone interviews but only went on five on-site interviews. All on-site interviews were in the South Florida area (where I live).

What was your work situation while you were job hunting?

Since February 2012, I was job hunting while unemployed. I completed two semesters in that time – during one of those semesters I did a fieldwork internship at Florida International University Library. One of the connections I made there suggested me for a Temporary Reference Librarian position (part-time) at Nova Southeastern University which I began in November 2012. I continued to search for permanent and full-time placement until I was hired as Part-time Information Literacy Instructor at Miami Dade College in May 2013.

Were you volunteering anywhere?

No.

Did you travel for interviews?

No.

Did you decline any offers?

Yes. I declined three offers.

Your Job

What’s your new job?

I am the Associate Instructor at Miami Dade College’s Medical Campus Learning Resources.

Is your job full or part time? Permanent or temporary?

My position is full-time, permanent staff.

Did you relocate?

No.

How did you find the listing for your job?

I was working at a PT librarian at a different campus. My director informed me of the opening and encouraged me to apply.

Did you meet all of the required qualifications? How many of the desired qualifications?

I met all the required qualifications. Though an MLIS isn’t required, it was highly recommended.

What was the application process like? How many interviews did you do?

Application was online. I was called for a panel interview during which I had to deliver a mock library instruction. A couple of weeks later, I was called for a second interview during which the directors of the various campus Learning Resources each asked a question. A week or so later, I was called by the College-Wide Director to congratulate me in getting the job.

How did you prepare for the interview(s)?

I was fortunate in that I had already delivered library instruction for the college so all I really had to do was modify existing Powerpoints. I reviewed the job descriptions as I usually do and identified the key components of the job that I would likely be asked about. I usually practice answering questions aloud beforehand, too.

Did you know anyone in the organization that hired you? If so, how?

I only knew my own campus library director. She was one of several on the panel.

Is your job commensurate with your skills, experience and expectations?

My job has exceeded my expectations. I think I bring a lot of additional skills to the table that have brought value to my library and I know there are a lot of things I’ve never considered learning about that I am finding myself engaged in and loving.

Is the pay scale higher or lower than you were looking for?

It’s what I was expecting but I was hoping for more.

What do you think was the biggest obstacle in your job hunt? How did you overcome it?

I think the lack of “2 or more years library experience” has been the biggest obstacle. Requisite skills? Check. Requisite education? Check. Glowing recommendations? Check. Experience outside of libraries? Check. Experience in libraries? Not so much. There’s really no overcoming it. There’s just accepting that – at least for two years – you’ll be working at a different position than you might otherwise have liked.

What set you apart from the other applicants? Why did they hire you?

I don’t know what set me apart on paper. I do know that, during interviews, I’m confident about what skills I have and what challenges I face, and I share them openly.

State of the Job Market

What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve seen on a job announcement?

I can’t think of anything so outlandish.

What was your favorite interview question? What was the worst?

I like being asked scenario questions. As much as I appreciate the need to standardize interviews and ask the same questions to all candidates, I loathe being asked a question that I’ve already answered in response to another question.

Any good horror stories for us?

One of the jobs I turned down was at a really small private college (max 100 students total) where I would be the only person working at the library. The pay offered was $30,000/ year non-negotiable. This was for over 40 hours per week and six days a week. The schedule would require me to be there for morning sessions, then take a break of 2-3 hours so that I could come back for evening sessions that ended well into the night. I’d also be coming into a library with no existing librarian to pass the torch or mentor me or even tell me what needed to be done. This was prior to me having any library experience other than my three-month fieldwork.

Has job hunting been a positive or negative experience, for the most part?

For me, it was a really hard time – not just because of the difficulty in getting a library job, but because I was unemployed for a large part of it and had no job security for the time I was temping. Even finding work outside of libraries felt impossible.

Would you change your answer to “what’s the secret to getting hired”?

I had said the secret what being at the right place at the right time and knowing the right people…I think my experience in libraries continues to prove this true to me: I got a temp position because a librarian I worked with during my fieldwork internship passed along my name to a librarian at a different library. I got a second temp gig because the library director where I was doing my first temp gig thought I could help out at one of her other campuses. I got a job offer (I later turned it down) for a position that I had interviewed only after I was asked to apply. I was asked to apply because I had come highly recommended to the library director by my graduate advisor. Even my current placement was gained by right place/right time/ right connection: II knew about my current position’s opening because my library director told me about it. She knew my work and thought I could do well in this position.

…of course, you could be in the right place at the right time and know the right people and it still wouldn’t make you any more likely to land a job if you didn’t assert your value every day. People have to want to recommend you. They have to know that you’re capable and that you’d be an asset to someone else’s team.

Anything else you want to tell us?

My experiences and struggles looking for work introduced me to the concept of career literacy. Maybe it’s me looking at the glass half-full, but I’d like to think that going through everything from filing for unemployment to creating resumes to choosing outfits for interviews to really wondering whether or not I would be able to afford groceries on $16/ month of food stamps has helped me be a better librarian. I became career literate by necessity and learned, from experience, what college students looking for professional work will have to face in their near futures. It’s knowledge that can’t be gained through any amount of study and it makes me passionate about providing the best information, digital, and career literacy instruction I can.

If you took the Job Hunter’s Survey some time in the last year and are interested in doing a follow-up, even anonymously, please contact me at hiringlibrarians AT gmail.

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There is a “Black Hole” of Information After One Drops a Resume

This interview originally appeared on March 11, 2013. Then we followed up with Ms. Moran on December 9, 2013. This year’s follow up will post shortly.
Cristy MoranThis interview is with job hunter Cristy Moran, who graduated from the University of South Florida (MLIS, 2012).  She is currently a Temporary Reference Librarian at Nova Southeastern University’s Alvin Sherman Research, Information, and Technology Center in Broward County, FL. Despite being hired within the last two months, and she continues to avidly seek permanent professional work, as she has for the last year to 18 months. Ms. Moran is looking in academic, public, school, and special libraries, for entry level positions.  Here is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

Library work: MLIS supervised fieldwork internship at a state university library working reference and creating online instructional materials correlated with their digital collections (3 months), continued volunteering in the Reference Department of the library where I did my internship at the same capacity (4 months), and currently working as a temporary reference librarian PT at a private university joint-use (public and academic) library (2 months).

Ms. Moran is in an urban area in the Southern US, and is willing to move anywhere. She is currently editing her first novel for self-publishing, teaching herself how to knit, and blogging on Public Libraries Online. For more details of her work and professional interests, visit her e-Portfolio.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. Full time, 2. Adequate pay (at least above $36k/ year where I live but is negotiable depending on the cost of living where an opening or job offer is located), 3. Benefits

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA JobLIST, professional listservs (I am a member of ALA, NMRT, and my graduate school’s LIS student group.), Florida Library Jobs (I live in Florida), my former graduate advisor and other library professional contacts, Facebook groups for librarians looking for work, GovJobs online, USAjobs online, individual institutional jobsites (i.e. University of Miami, Florida International University, Nova Southeastern University, Miami Dade College, Broward College, etc. job sites), Employ Florida website – everywhere and anywhere I can find librarian job listings.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I have pre-created resumes and CVs for different libraries (academic, public, private) and have a series of cover letter templates ready to go for different kinds of positions (entry-level, Librarian I, instructional positions, administrative/non-librarian positions, paraprofessional positions, programming librarian positions, diversity, age ranges, etc.) and a pdf of my official MLIS transcript in a USB I carry with me always. If I find a job I’m interested in, I can easily send an application package via email – if that’s what they want – within the first few minutes.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

√ To follow-up after an interview

√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

 How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

 Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

 What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

I think new librarians with varying professional backgrounds should be allowed to apply even if they don’t meet a specific requirement of length of time working in PAID positions in libraries post-MLIS. Many of us have extensive professional resumes outside of libraries that we can bring into the field and, often, we are not considered for even application review because we haven’t been working in a library as a paid permanent employee for over 2 years. (Many of us have had to take unpaid internships, temporary positions, and volunteer opportunities in libraries in a professional, paraprofessional, etc. position because of lack of opportunities for employment.)

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

There should be more communication. Employers should confirm receipt of resume, let candidates know whether one qualifies to move onto the resume review position or does not, provide information as to the length of time it will take for the committee to review applications or move further along the hiring process, etc. There is a “black hole” of information after one drops a resume. (Trust me, I’ve applied to over 200 librarian positions in 2012 alone.)

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

The secret to getting hired is – I find – being at the right place at the right time. The temp job I have now I found because of the network I created where I did my internship and, later, volunteered. The position I’m up for in another institution had been open for a while and hadn’t been filled so the library contacted my graduate advisor for any suitable candidates she might know – that is how I applied for it (I didn’t meet the minimum experience requirement but after some communication with the head librarian, was asked to apply.) I find that it’s not the effort that the job-seeker puts out but what appears on the resume in black and white…and the only way to get a job otherwise is to “know people who know people” in the industry with a specific need they need to fill immediately.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

I think this is a great survey. I’ve been actively pursuing my professional library career for some time and find that the job seeker is often not considered for feedback and information. A lot of emphasis is placed on what the job seeker “can do” or “shouldn’t do” but, in many ways, the job seeker can do everything “right” and still be overlooked for jobs or blocked out of the hiring process. Hopefully – regardless of whether or not I get placed in a job immediately – I can benefit from the work you’re doing and so will other librarians and librarian-wannabes!

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Southern US, Urban area

First of all, could you please call it graduate school, not library school?

Blumengart School Children 1963This anonymous interview is with an employee who works in a special library who has been a hiring manager. When asked “Are you a librarian?” the respondent replied with “It’s complicated.” This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Researchers

This librarian works at a library with 50-100 staff members in a suburban area in the Northeastern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Digital Collections
√ History of Books/Libraries
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Information Behavior
√ Other: It’s impossible to answer this out of context. Different settings require different skills and background.

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

First of all, could you please call it graduate school, not library school? Let’s operate in the 21st century, please.

Again, this is very context-dependent. Can’t really answer. What someone learns in my legal research center is very different from your public library, or school library, for example.

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Professional organization involvement
√ Other: If, by “should”, you mean that this should be required of them, then I’d say none of the above – it’s not always reasonable to expect a student to meet such a requirement. However, if you mean that ideally a student should have this experience, then my answers are noted above.

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

Why are you asking this?

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Get a job.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

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Filed under 50-100 staff members, Northeastern US, Special, Suburban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

Every little bit of experience that you can get will add up and help you.

ConDev5378A Hunting Dog, 1945, Washington County, NCThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for more than 18 months. This person is looking in academic libraries at the following levels: Entry level and requiring at least two years of experience. Here is this person’s experience with internships/volunteering:

I did an internship as an undergrad at my undergrad institution to make sure that I actually wanted to spend the money on grad school. That internship I worked on reference, digitization/preservation, collection development, and services assessment. I also did editing for a professional journal. My second internship was at a small private college where I worked on collection development (specifically weeding and replenishing the business reference collection), reference, and information literacy/tutorial creation. Getting a lot of different experiences and meeting a lot of people can really help when you go to look for jobs as you’ll have at least a little bit of experience with all of the different hats librarians wear.

This job hunter is in a suburban area in the Northeastern US and is not willing to move.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Is full time; is in reference, information literacy, acquisitions or technical services; is in my home area.

Where do you look for open positions?

Professional listservs: LIS-JOBS-LIST and IST-JOBS-LIST.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Only for certain kinds of employers

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

My routine is to go over the job ad and highlight specific things that they are looking for. Then, because I’ve written so many of them, I go over previous cover letters that secured phone or in-person interviews to see what I can re-use that showcases how I fit those qualifications. If there’s nothing already there, I develop it so that it is. I then go over and update my resume if necessary. I proofread everything twice and have a friend in the field also go over it for suggestions and proofing.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Other: Explanation of how things (budget, organization, project management, etc.) work in that particular place.

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Considering that at my current place of employment had one part time position open and received 40+ applications (two from people who held PhDs), and another place had a full time position that paid less than $25,000 per year and they received 120+ applications, I don’t think they have to try too hard. People in my area are absolutely desperate for librarian work.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Be honest and communicate with applicants. If a position opens, be honest about the time frame that it will take to complete the hiring process. And once it is complete, at least let those who didn’t make the cut know in a timely fashion.

For those they do interview and or eventually hire, it would be wise to try to consolidate everything that they need from the applicant into one day. Stretching the process out over several days, several weeks apart can be very stressful for applicants.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Networking and excellent performance. I got my first internship because my academic advisor knew a library director personally and vouched for my hard work. That director hired me for my first professional position, part time, when I finally completed library school. He in turn gave a great recommendation to another director, who also hired me part time. They both gave fantastic recommendations to a third director, who just hired me for my first full time position. I did my part by always doing the best job I could, but it was my supervisors’ recommendations that gave me the interviews that actually led to jobs.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

I just want to pass on this small piece of advice to job seekers. Every little bit of experience that you can get will add up and help you. I have been working part time at two places for almost two years, but it was finally enough be able to secure a full time position. Just keep trying and good luck!

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Fill in all of the easy information first

PhC42.Bx17.Hunting.F13This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for six months to a year. This person is looking in public and school libraries at the entry level. Here is this person’s experience with internships/volunteering:

I volunteered in a school library for a year before graduate school. I student taught in two locations. I did practicum work in various libraries. I have substitute taught in many different schools and grade levels.

This job hunter is in a city/town in the Northeastern US and is willing to move within [a] 100 mile radius.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Consistent Schedule, working with students (k-12), in a library.

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist, INALJ, BOCES website, school websites, newspaper.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Fill in all of the easy information first. Review and think about any additional questions. Take a break. Fill in the remainder of the application. I spend 30 minutes to a few hours.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Advertise more widely for school library positions.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Advertise available jobs for school library positions, and when calling to offer an interview tell candidates what grade levels they are interviewing for.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

If I knew, I’d have a job…

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

How many interviews have you had for a library position and for how many jobs? 11 interviews for 4 positions.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under City/town, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US

True to who librarians should be and not what corporate America is trying to push us into becoming.

Keene High School, (Keene Academy), Keene, New Hampshire

 

This anonymous interview is with a  library worker who has been a member of a hiring or search committee.

 

This person works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a city/town in the Northeastern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ No

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

4

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Grant Writing
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Archives
√ History of Books/Libraries
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Readers’ Advisory
√ Information Behavior
√ Field Work/Internships

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

Common sense. To work in any library you must have a feel for your work, that intangible feeling for the job as a librarian.
True to who librarians should be and not what corporate America is trying to push us into becoming.
Yes the job should evolve, but as with teachers, the basics never get old or outdated.
Learning how to garner information from secondary sources and books, is a skill. I thank Mark Schwartz formerly of West Thomson for all his seminars and training…

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

Everything! too many to name.

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

volunteer AND or do an internship in all libraries. And if you can, try both in corporate and public venues.

Do you have any other comments, for library schools or students, or about the survey?

Try to like what you do! if not Don’t do it.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, City/town, Northeastern US, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School