Job Hunter Follow Up: Holly Luetkenhaus

Holly Luetkenhaus

 

Holly Luetkenhaus took the Job Hunter’s survey on January 27, 2014.

 

Her responses appeared as Put yourself in the best position to get hired

Your Background

How long has it been since you got your library degree?

Just under one year; I completed the degree in December 2013.

How many years of library work experience do you have?

Prior to beginning my current job, I had 1.5 years as a graduate assistant while completing my program, and 2 years as a student assistant in my college’s library while an undergraduate.

How many years of work experience outside of libraries do you have?

Three years, as a college composition instructor.

How old are you? 

29

Your Job Hunt

How long did it take you before you found your job?

I found my job while I was still in graduate school–I am one of the lucky ones, I know. The search took me about 5 months, from first application to hire date.

How many positions did you apply to?

I am not sure of the exact number, but somewhere between 10 and 15.

How many interviews did you go on?

One on campus interview, 2 phone interviews.

What was your work situation while you were job hunting?

I was still in school, working as a graduate assistant in a campus library.

Were you volunteering anywhere?

No

Did you travel for interviews? If so, who paid?

Yes, and the institution paid for all of my travel expenses, including meals.

Did you decline any offers?

Nope, I took the first job I was offered.

Your Job

What’s your new job?

Instruction Librarian

Is your job full or part time? Permanent or temporary?

Full time, permanent

Did you relocate? If so, who paid?

I did relocate, about 2000 miles. I was given a relocation allocation by the institution. It covered most of the moving expenses, but I did end up covering some out of pocket.

How did you find the listing for your job?

ALA’s Joblist

Did you meet all of the required qualifications? How many of the desired qualifications?

I met all of the required qualifications, and most of the desired.

What was the application process like? How many interviews did you do?

For the job I was hired for, it was a pretty quick process, as the institution wanted to fill the position quickly. I did one phone interview, and then an on-campus. Most other communication was done through email (such as scheduling interviews), which I really liked because it gave me time to think about scheduling, etc., before replying. For the overall application process, I did 1 on-campus interview (the job I eventually got), 2 phone interviews, and turned down 1 phone interview offer that came through after I had accepted a position.

How did you prepare for the interview(s)?

I put my research skills to the test and did a lot of searching for sample interview questions, talked to my supervisors, dug through past school and work projects to find examples of work I was proud of or showcased a skill, and started an “interview log” where I recorded things that could be good to talk about in an interview.. I wanted to be sure if I was asked about strengths, weaknesses, or examples of work I had done that I had clear, relevant examples to share. Also, because I was applying and interviewing for positions that included a large teaching component, I also took some time to write and reflect about my teaching experiences and philosophy, so I could speak to that as well. And of course, I researched the universities, libraries, and cities/towns a lot, so that I could connect my experiences and skills to their institution’s strategic plan, etc. This also helped me to brainstorm (and write down!) questions to ask the search committee about the school and library.

Did you know anyone in the organization that hired you? If so, how?

No.

Is your job commensurate with your skills, experience and expectations?

Yes. I really feel lucky that I found a job quickly, doing exactly what I wanted to do, and it fits my skillset.

Is the pay scale higher or lower than you were looking for?

It is about what I was expecting, based on my research of pay for similar positions in the larger geographic area.

What do you think was the biggest obstacle in your job hunt? How did you overcome it?

I am a terribly shy, quiet person, and I hate talking about myself. So I had to practice, and I did, with friends, family, and coworkers. I had to figure out how to “brag” about my accomplishments in an authentic way, without sounding fake, which was hard, because I have always been someone who purposely avoids being the center of attention. Preparing a presentation was probably the biggest hurdle for me, so I practiced in front of people I trusted to give me constructive feedback..

What set you apart from the other applicants? Why did they hire you?

There are 3 reasons members of my search committee have mentioned since I began my job. First, my teaching experience. This position required teaching a large number of information literacy classes, and required being a liaison to the composition program. Having the experience as a college writing instructor set me apart. Second, one colleague said it was the way I talked about myself and my work. He was impressed that I talked about myself as a professional, rather than a grad student trying to be a professional. The third reason I have heard is because of my willingness (even excitement) to relocate. My current institution is in a small town, in a fairly rural area, and I’ve heard that for some people, that’s a big deal-breaker, and they can pick up on it fairly easily. It seems my enthusiasm for the small town charm (which was not exaggerated–I really do love small towns)–was a big plus for them, and gave them some hope I was would stick around for a while.

State of the Job Market

What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve seen on a job announcement?

I think it’s crazy when I see part-time positions that require an MLS, and loads of reference or teaching experience.

What was your favorite interview question? What was the worst?

I cannot remember a specific favorite question, but I liked the ones that gave me the chance to talk about a specific project I had worked on. As I mentioned before, I hate talking about myself, so being able to shift that a little bit, and talk about the work I was doing and what I loved about made it easier. On the flipside, I always hate the “Tell us about your weaknesses” or “Describe a time when you failed at something, and how you responded.” I don’t think anyone ever answers those questions completely truthfully, because why would we? People either respond with cliche answers, or we stretch the truth. I also think there are better questions you can use to really get at a candidate’s passion, so why waste your time with questions that won’t get you information you need?

Any good horror stories for us?

Unfortunately, no. I always love a good interview horror story. Mine experience was pretty straight-forward.

Has job hunting been a positive or negative experience, for the most part?

I think mine was about as positive as they can be. Job hunting is so stressful, especially if you’re in a situation like I was, where you are about to graduate, can’t keep your current job because you will no longer be a student, and have a family counting on your income. I probably would have taken any first job offer I got, simply because I had a finite amount of time to find a job before the student loan payments kicked back in.

Would you change your answer to “what’s the secret to getting hired”?

I don’t think so. I think the job search process is a great time to be self-reflective about what you truly want and what you are truly qualified for, and find where those intersect. I would add one thing to my earlier answer, and that is to restate how important it is to know what you want. Search committees can tell the difference between someone who is not really interested in specific job, and one who is excited about the opportunities the job offers. At least, mine could, and many people I met that day have since commented that it it was very clear that I really wanted this job, not just any job.

Anything else you want to tell us?

This was such a great resource while I was job hunting, and it gave me a lot of perspectives to consider. So thanks for doing this–it helps a lot of us keep some peace of mind during a crazy, stressful time.

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Put yourself in the best possible position to get hired

This post originally appeared on March 18, 2014. A follow up with Ms. Luetkenhaus will be posted in just a few moments.
Holly LuetkenhausHolly Leutkenhaus is an Instruction Librarian at Washington State University . She is a new librarian, having started her first professional position in January.She has an MA (English) and an MLS. Having been hired during her last semester in library school, she says,

It does not escape me that I am lucky to have landed a job (and a great one at that) so quickly. I was able to move immediately from my graduate degree into my position. I credit the assistantship I had while in my MLS program (and the wonderful librarians I worked with), as well as my teaching background, for my ability to find a professional position so quickly.

Prior to her move into libraries. Ms. Leutkenhaus spent 3 years as an adjunct college composition instructor. She says,

I love teaching, and I know that my background as a composition instructor heavily influenced the University’s decision to hire me. I was the right fit at the right time: they wanted someone to help strengthen the libraries’ relationship with and support of the Composition Program, and I wanted to be that person, with my background having grounded in me a passion for working with writing instructors and first-year college students.

Ms. Leutkenhaus took the Job Hunter’s Survey on January 27, 2014. At the time, she was currently employed, had been hired within the last two months, and had been looking for a new position for less than six months, in academic libraries at the entry level. Here is how she described her experience with internships/volunteering:

I was lucky as a grad student to have an assistant with great opportunities, and didn’t need to seek out additional forms of experience.

 

While job hunting, Ms. Luetkenhaus was in a rural area in the MidWestern US and was willing to move anywhere. You can find her on LinkedIn and on Twitter @hjl85

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. fits my career goals and interests
2. pays a reasonable salary (hey, I’ve got MLS loans to pay off)
3. college-wide support for the library

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist
Chronicle
HigherEd Jobs
Info Lit (ALA) listserv

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I would spend about 2-3 hours prepping each one, sometimes more, sometimes less. It depended on what the job ad was requiring. For example, for a position that included a significant amount of teaching, writing a teaching philosophy would take considerably longer.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Other: seeing how employees interact with one another, and how library administration interacts with employees

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be honest about what you’re looking for. If you really would prefer someone with a specific type of skill or experience, say it.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Be more communicative. There are some jobs I applied for over 6 months ago and still haven’t heard anything.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Being honest with yourself about what you want from a job. It shows in your application and your interview if you are truly passionate about doing the job. Also, put yourself in the best possible position to get hired. Meaning, understand what you truly are and are not qualified to do. I knew with what I wanted to do, I would need more than just an MLS, so I put in the extra two years for a second Master’s to make myself that much more competitive. Not everyone has the time or money to commit to that, I know, and then it’s even more important to be honest with yourself about what you are qualified to do, and if there’s a way to start smaller and work up.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

This website was so valuable to me when I was job hunting. Not only the question archive, but hearing other peoples’ stories. They were a great way to become familiar with amazingly varied views on the profession and job hunting.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Job Hunter Follow Up: Lauren Bourdages

Lauren Bourdages

 

Lauren Bourdages took the Job Hunter’s survey on December 12/29/2012.

Her responses appeared as Preparation, Research and Enthusiasm.

Your Background

How long has it been since you got your library degree?

About a year and a half.

How many years of library work experience do you have?

2 years.

How many years of work experience outside of libraries do you have?

12 years of part-time and seasonal work.

How old are you? 

Late 20s.

Your Job Hunt

How long did it take you before you found your job?

Getting to the full-time position I am in now took 4 years, I started hunting in mid 2010 (after finishing my BEd and before starting the library technician program), along the way I did manage to get related part-time positions though.

How many positions did you apply to?

At least 163 (there are more but I can’t be sure how many because for school board positions you use a single application package for any openings they have through applytoeducation)

How many interviews did you go on?

45? For the same reason as with applications I can’t be 100% certain about the amount of interviews I went on.

What was your work situation while you were job hunting?

In school, full-time distance program, the entire time. My employment during that period was a bit of a journey. I started out in a movie theatre for a year before I finally got hired as a Page at a public library. I paged for a year and did my first of two field placements during that time. After that I then moved into a salaried part-time position managing a donor information database for a university, and did my second field placement during that time.After a year at the University I got a second job as a Supply School Library Technician. In February of this year I was laid off from my University position, and then while I was on seasonal layoff from my school board job I was hired for my current full-time position.

Were you volunteering anywhere?

Yes, I started off volunteering at the public library and then they hired me. I volunteered briefly with the organisation I did one of my field placements with and briefly at a school library in the board I was supplying with; and I also volunteer for INALJ and professional associations.

Did you travel for interviews? If so, who paid?

No, I only job hunted locally the furthest I had to go for an interview was 45 minutes one way.

Did you decline any offers?

Yes, 2. The first back in January of this year because the commute + the duties + the pay they were willing to offer and not budge on was not something I could see myself being happy with at all, especially not long term; and the second because it was a relief/part-time position and I had a second, better offer at the same time.

Your Job

What’s your new job?

I am a Reserves and User Services Associate at the Wilfrid Laurier University Library.

Is your job full or part time? Permanent or temporary?

Full-time permanent with a 9 week seasonal layoff every year.

Did you relocate? If so, who paid?

No! In fact I’m back at my alma mater with a 10 minute commute which is right up my alley!

How did you find the listing for your job?

Checking the University’s job page daily was something I did for both myself and for my role as the Senior Assistant for INALJ Ontario.

Did you meet all of the required qualifications? How many of the desired qualifications?

The only desired qualification I didn’t have was experience working with ARES, but I was able to showcase how quickly I pick up new software.

What was the application process like? How many interviews did you do?

The University uses an ATS where you submit your resume and cover letter and fill out the standard ATS information. After the deadline they were very quick getting out invitations to interview. There was only 1 interview with 4 people, because it’s a split position I report to 2 supervisors so the interview was with them, the Library’s Administrative Manager and a representative from the University’s HR department. To put into perspective how fast everything moved, my cover letter is dated July 21, the application period ended on the 22nd, and I started in the job on August 18.

How did you prepare for the interview(s)?

I asked a colleague from the library at the University where I worked in fundraising who works with ARES to tell me about ARES so I could get a sense of the reserves process. I also asked a colleague at the hiring University who I already knew from a professional association committee to give me the inside scoop on things I should know about the current direction/inner workings of the library. I spent some time on the new library website. I didn’t have to do as much prep for this interview as I have had to for others because I am already incredibly intimate with the library at this University having been a student there for 6 years.

Did you know anyone in the organization that hired you? If so, how?

Yes, as I mentioned above I previously worked with one of the Librarians on a professional association committee.

Is your job commensurate with your skills, experience and expectations?

It most definitely is. It’s a library technician level position and I am a trained library technician. It’s entry level, and as it’s my first full-time position that’s exactly what I was after.

Is the pay scale higher or lower than you were looking for?

It’s what I was looking/hoping for but is higher than I was expecting based on other salaries in the industry that I have come across in this geographic area so I am happy with it.

What do you think was the biggest obstacle in your job hunt? How did you overcome it?

The biggest obstacle for me was just the market saturation in my area. I’m not actually able to relocate, and I don’t handle commuting well, so to actually find a position in my current geographical area smack in the middle of two cities offering MLIS programs, with a College that offers the Library Technician program meant I was constantly up against really stiff competition and routinely lost out to people who had many more years of experience than I do. Like the time I interviewed for a part-time children’s programmer position at a rural public library branch, I was one of 140 who applied, only 4 of us got interviews, the person they ended up hiring had 8 years of experience in children’s library programming compared to my similar years of experience in children’s programming outside of libraries.

What set you apart from the other applicants? Why did they hire you?

For this position it was my knowledge of and comfort with this particular University’s library that sealed the deal. I was talking to one of my coworkers the other day and he actually said to me that it was a coup to get me for this position because of how familiar I already am with the system.

State of the Job Market

What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve seen on a job announcement?

As a volunteer for INALJ I look at A LOT of job postings but I can’t think of anything ridiculous that I’ve seen unless you mean ridiculous job titles in which case the most ridiculous one was the most awesome one there was a local tech company looking to hire someone under the title Data Geek.

What was your favorite interview question? What was the worst?

I don’t think I ever encountered any questions that really deviated from the standard type of interview questions. I always enjoyed explaining the work I do for INALJ so that was probably my favourite thing to be asked. The worst? For me it was any time someone seeing the BEd on my resume just assumed that having it meant I wanted to be a teacher, it is not fun to be regularly asked in an interview some variation of “So what would you do if someone offered you a teaching position tomorrow?” It’s just really frustrating to hear because it feels like it should be obvious that since I‘ve earned my library technician diploma AFTER my BEd and all of my listed work experience is in libraries and library related jobs that I clearly have no interest in teaching elementary or secondary school. I don’t regret doing my BEd because my instructional skills will be incredibly useful in libraries, but I do get irked with the constant questioning of why I have it.

Has job hunting been a positive or negative experience, for the most part?

For the most part it was a positive experience, you know aside from being long.

Would you change your answer to “what’s the secret to getting hired”?

I still believe that preparation, research and enthusiasm are 3 of the most important things to getting hired but I would also add connections and industry involvement.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Get involved with professional associations!! Seriously, being engaged in the profession can only benefit your personal job search and by getting involved you’re helping to keep professional associations running which benefits everyone in the industry.

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Preparation, Research and Enthusiasm

This interview originally appeared on February 4th, 2013.  I am reposting in light of her follow-up interview, which will run in just a few moments.
Lauren Bourdages

This interview is with Lauren Bourdages, who will be graduating from the Library and Information Technician (LIT)**, and Records and Information Management programs at Conestoga College in Kitchener ON in the spring of 2013. Ms. Bourdages was hired into her first “real” job in the industry in June of this year, as the (part-time) Advancement Assistant, Gift Processing and Records Management for St. Jerome’s University.She has been job hunting for a year to 18 months, in Academic libraries, with library vendors/service providers, public libraries, school libraries, special libraries, companies with info management needs, and anywhere with a fundraising department, for entry-level and positions requiring two years of experience. On internships/volunteering, Ms. Bourdages has this to say:

I am a new grad from a Canadian Library Technician program; for this program I completed 2 internships. For the first I was the sole Library Technician under a Research Librarian in a small special library (we were the only two staff) for a world renowned global policy think tank. For my second internship I focussed on information architecture and management as a SharePoint Development Intern with the Office of Advancement at a local University. During the first year of my two year diploma program I also volunteered weekly as a Book Reserves Assistant at the local Public Library.

She lives in a city/town in Canada, and is not willing to move.  She has two upcoming projects, writing a book blog called Novel Concepts, and heading up the soon-to-launch INALJ Ontario.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Flexible hours

Variety in tasks

Mainly working on a computer

Where do you look for open positions?

Specific library and company websites, eluta.ca, The University of Western Ontario FIMS job board, The University of Toronto iSchool job board

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Customising resume and cover letter to reflect the job posting and organisation’s needs/how I fulfill them. Takes me about 2 hours.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

√ To follow-up after an interview

√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me


How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Create extremely thorough job description postings that always include the salary range. Ensure their postings appear on relevant industry job boards such as UWO FIMS and UofT iSchool. Advertise their organisations through industry professional association publications.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Open the lines of communication as much as possible to keep all applicants in the loop.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Preparation, research and enthusiasm.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

I think a question about previous related work not involving internships would be a good question.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

**Lauren also says:

LIT programs are governed and accredited by the Canadian Library Association in the same way that MLS/MLIS/MSLS programs are governed and accredited by the American Library Association. Here in Canada you can and will find Technicians and Librarians working side by side at every level in the Library and Information Industry, in both the traditional and non-traditional settings.

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Communicate the status every few weeks.

PhC42.Bx17.Hunting.F12-2This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for six months to a year. entry person is looking in academic libraries, public libraries, and academic departments at the entry level.

This job hunter is in a city/town in the Western US and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. Salary, 2. If the job requires working predominantly with computers/websites (versus with people), 3. Location.

Where do you look for open positions?

LibraryJobline.org, listservs, LinkedIn, ALA Joblist.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

For an academic packet, 5+ hours. Others, 2 hours.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Highest salary possible; include tuition waivers; offer funding for conferences.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Communicate the status every few weeks.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

If the employer thinks you are the right fit.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

What kinds of questions do you ask the potential employer during interviews?
What books have you found useful?

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under City/town, Job hunter's survey, Western US

I was interviewed by 10 people for 1 hours and during the interview some people left the room one by one… it was weird

Brian Hunter, 1984, Asst Librarian, Slavonic Collections, London School of EconomicsThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, and School libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience at a court law library. This job hunter is in a city/town, in the  Western US, and is not willing to move.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

creativity freedom
organized company
supportive team members

Where do you look for open positions?

cable network websites
school websites

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other:  Yes, It helps me decide if I want to apply or not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

sometimes a day or more. I update my resume for that particular job, change certain statements on a cover letter, and use that info to help complete the application.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Yes

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Clearly describe what the tasks for that position entail, and what accomplishments they want from the new team member.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Not have 6-10 people in the interview. I was so nervous when I was interviewed by 10 people for 1 hours and during the interview some people left the room one by one… it was weird.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

smiles, and prepare to answer all questions asked.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

maybe add a section where you ask “what’s the best advise that has been given to you”.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Archives, City/town, Entry Level, Job hunter's survey, School, Western US

many have applied for a paraprofessional position that specifically noted that MLS holders were not being sought

Lagere school in woonwagenkampThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

general academic librarians

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Western US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

2

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Project Management
√ Collection Management
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Research Methods
√ Reference

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

critical thinking

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

specific systems, programming languages, acquisitions, outreach, grantwriting

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Internship or practicum

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

brick and mortar

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

fully online degree

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

fully comprehend the principles of librarianship and learn how to apply (good) theories; this is what separates professional librarians from paraprofessionals

Do you have any other comments, for library schools or students, or about the survey?

In my locale there seems to be a glut of junior librarians; many have applied for a paraprofessional position that specifically noted that MLS holders were not being sought. I think there’s one or more online college nearby churning out librarians needlessly. On the other hand, it’s very difficult to recruit seasoned librarians with experience under their belts.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshallfrom Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Urban area, Western US, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School