Tag Archives: librarians

Further Questions: Who hires librarians and what do they do?

This week we asked people who hire librarians

Who hires librarians and what do they do? Can you share with us the composition of the most recent search/hiring committees – number of committee members, their roles in the library, etc.? Are there stakeholders in the hiring process who should be involved but are not, or are only involved minimally (i.e. attending a presentation or meal with the candidate)? How is their feedback treated?

Paula HammetWhen we create a hiring committee for tenure track librarian positions, we include at least three librarians.  The hiring process (approving job descriptions and questions /criteria, accepting applications, sending out letters, etc.) is managed through our campus Faculty Affairs office.

Interviews for these type of positions typically last a very long day and include (it varies, depending on position):

  • Meet search committee chair at hotel for coffee & drive to campus.
  • Quick tour of library.
  • Setup and prepare for presentation (to all library faculty and staff, and occasionally other campus faculty).
  • Presentation (includes 20-25 min. for Q&A).
  • Discussion with Library staff (without the librarians).
  • Candidate Break.
  • Interview with Search Committee (at least 3 librarians).
  • Lunch with Library Faculty (usually 4-5 people).
  • Meeting with Director of Faculty Personnel (to answer questions about benefits, etc.).
  • Candidate leads an informal discussion with Library Faculty on a relevant topic of their choice.
  • Meeting with Library Dean.
  • Meet with search chair for followup and return to hotel.

For specialized positions (e.g., web services) we will include a meeting with staff with whom this person would be working directly.

The search committee solicits feedback from everyone and  considers it carefully. The search committee makes a recommendation to the Dean, who makes the offer to the preferred candidate.

We provide the presentation prompts and interview day schedule to the candidates a week before the interview.

Hope this is helpful in demystifying the process.

– Paula Hammett, Sonoma State University Library

Our hiring committees have a minimum of 2 people, more often it’s 3. The make-up of the committee varies depending on the job being interviewed for.

Examples off the top of my head:

  • Professional librarian (reference, public service, etc.): Branch manager or department head plus two others, usually other librarians or high-level paraprofessionals in that department/branch.
  • Department head or branch manager: Director and assistant director. Occasionally, other members of Library Administration, such as the Business Office Manager will be involved, depending on the position’s requirements.
  • Paraprofessional: Branch manager or department head plus two others, usually librarians or other paraprofessionals in the department/branch.

We don’t require presentations or take candidates out to lunch. The only people involved in the interview are the people on the search committee-they’re the ones who make the final decision. Stakeholders are directly involved in the process from start to finish.

– Margaret Neill, Regional Library Branch Manager, Main Library, El Paso Public Library

Laurie Phillips

Our search committees are generally 4-5 people. We try to keep it small to facilitate getting the work done in a timely way. Our practice is for the search committee to be made up of the primary people in the position’s area, plus one librarian from another area of the library. We have had staff on our search committees, but with our new process it’s unclear how that would work. Our whole library faculty reviews all applications with a set of guidelines (based on the requirements) and give each application a yes, no, or maybe. We then meet as a faculty to decide who will be interviewed by phone or videochat. The smaller committee then does the phone or video interviews. Committee members take notes and post them in Blackboard for all of the librarians to read. We then meet to decide who will move forward in a reference check. The committee divides up the remaining candidates and calls references. No committee member calls more than one reference for any candidate. Committee members post reference notes. The whole library faculty meets to decide, based on all of the information posted, who will be invited to interview on campus. The committee takes the candidate to dinner, but the whole library faculty participates in the candidate’s interview day, through attending the presentation, lunch, delivering the candidate to various meetings, or participating in the formal interview. The Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs, the Dean, and a group of interested staff also meet with the candidates. Some staff may be invited to lunch as well. Feedback is gathered from anyone not on the library faculty and is posted for the library faculty in Blackboard. The library faculty meets, reviews the feedback, discusses, and determines who they will recommend for hire. There are generally 2 candidates who are recommended, in priority order.

– Laurie Phillips, Associate Dean for Technical Services, J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library, Loyola University New Orleans

Most of our search committees for librarians are chaired by a librarian and composed of librarians, paraprofessional library staff, and depending upon the position colleagues from outside the library (teaching faculty or administrators depending upon the position – someone the hire will have a lot of contact with).  Usually 5 members.  While we would like to have students serve on the committees, their schedules make it difficult, so instead we do everything we can to invite students to participate in the lunch meetings, presentations and other opportunities to interact with candidates.

Everyone who has contact with a candidate is asked to complete a feedback form, expressing what they think are the strengths of the candidate, any areas of concern or growth areas for the candidate, and any other observations they would like to share with the committee.  Feedback may be anonymous.  The chair of the search committee receives the feedback and shares it in aggregate with the search committee and the dean.  The search committee’s charge is to provide the following information for those candidates they feel are viable at the end of the process:  strengths and assets of each candidate, concerns or deficits for each candidate, any additional information they think is relevant to share to aid in the dean’s deliberations.

– Anonymous, from a medium-sized liberal arts college

Celia RabinowitzSearch committees I have formed for librarian searches have always included librarians (usually at least 2), one staff member from the library (often I try to rotate people so the area does not matter that much), and a faculty member from outside the library (often from a department that the new librarian would support).  I have been in two pretty small academic libraries (7 and 9 librarians including me as director/dean) so having a staff member from a specific area isn’t so important as including staff.
We ask members of our student staff to give campus tours, to have breakfast or lunch with candidates, and encourage them to attend talks or teaching sessions.  An open talk or campus session would probably be only for the director level.  Everyone has equal access to feedback forms or talks with a search committee member and I have used student feedback very seriously in helping choose among candidates.

– Celia Rabinowitz,  Dean of Mason Library at Keene State College in Keene, NH

Thank you as always to our contributors for their time and insight.  If you’re someone who hires librarians and are interested in participating in this feature, please email us at hiringlibrariansquestionsATgmail.com.

Thank YOU for reading!  If you liked reading, you’re going to really love COMMENTING.

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Further Questions: What tips do you have for job seekers attending conferences?

This week we asked people who hire librarians

What tips do you have for job seekers attending conferences? How do you suggest they balance networking, attending sessions, and/or interview or informational sessions? Any special tips for first-time conference attendees?

Jessica OlinFirst: have a copy of your resume/CV with you, printed on nice paper. Some of the bigger conferences have specific help for job seekers, but you can make a connections at any kind of conference. Caveat: don’t force the issue. Wait for it to be appropriate.

Second: I am not sure how to balance things at a conference. Sometimes I go with learning in mind. Other times I focus on socializing and networking. At ACRL I left my schedule almost completely up in the air and went where friends wanted to go.
Third: Go to the orientation session(s) if it’s your first time. You’ll meet others who are new to that conference and get situated well. Also, check in with friends who are attending or have attended that conference. Finally, really big conferences sometimes have a way to pair up someone who is new to the conference with long time attendees. Check into that, for sure.
– Jessica Olin, Director of Parker Library, Wesley College

Marleah AugustineAttending conferences are a great way to learn more about the profession and the people involved. Something I would recommend is, just like what you wear, attend sessions for the job you want, not necessarily the job you have — or at least attend a balance of these sessions. If you’re currently working in a mid-range position but are planning to apply for director positions, attend some sessions meant for directors. Networking is important, but it doesn’t come easily to introverts like me — if you fall in that boat, find common ground with people. Go to sessions and presentations with questions already in mind, so you aren’t trying to think of something to say on the spot. Share your own experiences.

If you’re looking to apply for positions in a specific geographic area, seek out librarians from those areas who are presenting (their organization is typically listed in the conference program) and introduce yourself after their presentation. Of course, be genuine with your interest, but don’t be afraid to put yourself out there — speaking from experience, presenters are usually glad to speak with attendees about their topic or answer questions one-on-one. Take business cards — even if you’re not currently working, print some yourself that list some of your areas of expertise and experience. Don’t overlook the more “fun” activities — that’s often where conversations happen and you meet the most memorable people.

– Marleah Augustine, Adult Department Librarian at Hays Public Library

Julie TodaroJob seekers should focus on two primary aspects of conferences…the conference business activities planned for target job areas so –  for example – attending the children’s services business meeting if they are seeking a job in children’s services AND – of course – visiting the employment area of the conference….so looking at this by “pre,” “during” and “post…”
Pre
Review the Association website reviewing their processes for advertising area employment….both for general job seeking as well as job seeking during conferences. Example – do they post openings on their website? do they have a job fair or placement area at conference? Can you submit your resume prior to the conference? Is there a list of people interviewing? If the association offers the list of openings/organizations interviewing consider contacting them in advance saying you will be at conference and could you interview there?
Read the minutes from association areas for your target job such as review a few years of minutes from the academic library area membership or business meeting if you are seeking jobs in higher education. Look for open announcement periods during meetings to see if they allow (which they often do) attendees to announce jobs open.
Communicate with organizations that you have identified as having openings. Inform them that you will be at conference and you can interview/meet with them there. This cost saving often gets people interviews and the first “foot in the door.”
Create small packets (resume, cover letter, sample of your content) about “you” …take the packets to conference. Have them ready to hand out to those you meet.
Review social media both for area organizations and the Association. Take advantage of opportunities to introduce yourself…link to an online packet about you and listen to pre conference discussions.
Contact your educational institution. Ask their placement staff for openings in your area. If they don’t have any, ask if they have names of people in area organizations who are better to contact.
Search the usual regional and national lists…newspapers, etc. As in other recommendations, reach out to where you want to work…tell them you will be at the conference.
Review the conference program to identify programs for job seekers.
See if Conference activities offer a mentor program in your area of interest.
See if there are opportunities for you to present…contributed papers or poster sessions from your education program or from previous employment. Have your packets there with additional content on your expertise.
During
If there is an employment area, sign up!
If there are offerings on designing resumes, even if you have a good resume, attend to meet the area people.
If there aren’t placement centers/areas, ask Conference organizers if there are bulletin boards where you can post availability information and your interests.
Track social media discussion during conference to take advantage of last minute get-togethers of like-minded people or organizations from the area.
Attend the business meetings of groups you want to work for or with.
Attend opening and other social events.
Work with your mentor to identify activities for job opportunities.
Hand out the information packets you have about you!
Give programs you have signed up for…have your packets ready to hand out.
How do you suggest they balance networking, attending sessions, and/or interview or informational sessions?
Although education or information sessions are great for expanding knowledge bases, these should only be attended if your time is limited...if there are people delivering programs, on panels, etc. from organizations where you want to work AND if you have found that all of the job ads you see or positions you are seeking require awareness of a new content delivered at the conference.
Networking at conference will happen if you attend some of the previously mentioned activities! Introducing yourself at these events should include your name and the fact that you are here seeking employment and are here to interview for positions. If the setting is stand up or social or in a leisure setting such as a restaurant, hand out business cards (which indicate you are looking) rather than your longer packet…that is, make sure your information about you fits in someone’s packet.
Post
Send emails to individuals you met and organizational representatives. Thank them for any assistance or advice they gave you. Reaffirm your availability.
Any special tips for first-time conference attendees? 
  • Join any new members round table group.
  • Sign up for mentor assignments/sign up.
  • Email any recent organizations where you have applications “out there” and indicate you will be at the conference and can interview.
  • Look for “newbie” programs…organizations call these very different things …newbie, first- time-attendees…recent grads….new librarians…or areas addressing different status such as “switching careers?” moving into management? going from public to academic?
  • See if the conference hosts have a visual identifier for your name badge…some have a sticker “I am looking for a new position” or “first time attendee”…these are usually attention-getters and are designed to not only assist you in meeting people but in unusual places like an elevator as well as a party.

– Julie Todaro, Dean, Library Services, Austin Community College

angelynn kingWrite down everything you want to do at the conference, only do half of it, and don’t feel guilty. It’s normal.

 

 

 

-Angelynn King, Head Librarian, Delaware Technical Community College, Owens Campus

Thank you as always to our contributors for their time and insight.  If you’re someone who hires librarians and are interested in participating in this feature, please email us at hiringlibrariansquestionsATgmail.com.

Thank YOU for reading!  If you liked reading, you’re going to really love COMMENTING.

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Tech skills are absolutely needed.

Outdoor urban market sceneThis anonymous interview is with an employee who works in an academic library employee and has been a member of a hiring or search committee. When asked, “Are you a librarian?” the respondent said “It’s complicated.” This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Research services, scholarly communication

This employee works at a library with 100-200 staff members in an urban area in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Have the technical knowledge and soft skills required to do the job.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

HR weeds out initial applications, search committee ranks remaining applicants, first round invited for Skype interviews (top 5-6) , second round invited for in person (top 3).

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Poor application (eg no cover letter, materials not customized to position).

Application does not demonstrate skills related to position

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: Not sure

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Apply for jobs actually qualified for. Continue professional development and show evidence of skills ( certification, etc)

I want to hire someone who is

Dedicated

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 100-200

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ I don’t know

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

What happens in practice.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

It is changing but not dying. Tech skills are absolutely needed.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 100-200 staff members, Academic, Midwestern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area

HR can, and has, refuse to hire the candidate we recommend, without explanation

Man selling artichokes at vegetable market in Stockholm 1951This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

subject librarians, reference and instruction librarians, electronic resources and serials librarians, access services librarians, archivists

This librarian works at a library with 50-100 staff members in a suburban area in the Northeastern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 51-75 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

Met all the qualifications (education, experience, skills) for the position. This particular position didn’t require very much experience, yet we had 25 applicants and 12 were put on the “do not consider” list.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

We have a search committee for each librarian position consisting of 3 or 4 librarians and sometimes faculty or professional staff. Each search committee develops their own rubric for evaluating candidates. The search committee is solely responsible for evaluating the resumes and deciding who to interview. None are pre-screened by HR. (However HR can, and has, refuse to hire the candidate we recommend, without explanation). We have to document everything very thoroughly for HR using a software program called TechnoMedia. Notes from interviews are scanned in to the software to be archived.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Not meeting one of the key qualifications, such as not having the MLIS, or not having cataloging experience or science librarianship experience that is needed for that particular position.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Make sure you are qualified for the position you are applying for, and if you think there might be any doubt, explain explicitly in your cover letter how you meet all the qualifications.

I want to hire someone who is

competent

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 50-100

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are more positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Other: only temporarily

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

No, but we rarely have entry level openings. The Provost keeps insisting we hire at a higher level (I’m not sure why) though it’s not always really necessary. The one we are hiring now is basically entry level though it does ask for some type of science experience either as a librarian or as a scientist or health professional. We are flexible enough to count experience outside of the specific job description though (in other words you don’t have to have experience doing the exact job you’re applying for). In my opinion this attitude should be more widespread.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

There are still a lot of opportunities to add value as content becomes hosted electronically (in e-books, e-journals, and digital repositories).

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 50-100 staff members, Academic, Northeastern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Suburban area

many applicants do not answer these truthfully, in order to get their cvs to the committee

Man selling dill at vegetable market in Stockholm 1951This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

subject liaisons, special collections librarians and archivists

This librarian works at a library with 100-200 staff members in an urban area Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Having any experience at all in the areas we need.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

The HR application software asks questions that are supposed to weed out people who do not have our minimum requirements, though many applicants do not answer these truthfully, in order to get their cvs to the committee. We use search committees as well as a matrix based on our required and preferred qualifications.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Not having one of the required qualifications.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Demonstrate interest in this particular library.

I want to hire someone who is

curious

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 100-200

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are more positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Yes, we do, but only 6 months for most positions and we accept internship or student jobs

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

The field has changed.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

— It is very obvious when you send one cv or cover letter to many jobs, even if you change the name of the university.
— Do some research into the library you are applying to, and demonstrate your knowledge in your cover letter.
— If something is listed on the job announcement as required, we are unable to hire someone without that requirement without closing the search, getting approval from HR, and starting a new search.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 100-200 staff members, Academic, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area

Traditional librarianship is not so much dying as out of fashion

Market before PassoverThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Subject liaisons, data managers, information literacy specialists, user experience specialists

This librarian works at a library with 100-200 staff members in a rural area in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 26-50 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

Met basic requirements, had required experience, knowledge & skills

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

Applicants not meeting educational requirements are weeded out by HR. We can give HR other rubrics but have not. Then the search committee compiles a very basic “yes” and “no” list. After that it gets more difficult. The search committee comes up with 3 to 5 applicants to contact by telephone; then we like to bring in 2 or 3 candidates for on-site interviews. However, in some cases our administration will allow only 1 on-site interview.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Not enough of the right kind of experience – or less of that experience than others who are invited to interview

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Tailor resume and cover letter for each position applied to rather than sending the same thing to all employers. Become familiar with the requirements and be sure the employer knows you can meet the requirements. Give concrete examples to demonstrate experience, knowledge & skills during interview.

I want to hire someone who is

intelligent

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 100-200

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ I don’t know

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Yes, we usually require 2-3 years of experience, which is listed in the official job ad. We are generally so short-staffed that we can’t really provide training, so experience is important.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ I don’t know

Why or why not?

Traditional librarianship is not so much dying as out of fashion, it seems to me. We feel the need to use different terminology and “prove” we’re relevant because we worry so much about being a dying profession. It seems to me that we worry too much, which causes us to abandon traditional library functions even when they are still useful. Then we hire multiple people to redesign websites every year with new bells and whistles but little improvement in accessibility to information. New search capabilities can’t find data or metadata that has not been created in the first place or has been poorly created.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 100-200 staff members, Academic, Midwestern US, Rural area, State of the Job Market 2015

Librarianship is changing into a community connections field, where we connect people with other people or services that can benefit them

OUTDOOR MARKET AT HAYMARKET SQUARE. PUBLIC PROTEST KEPT THE SQUARE FROM BECOMING PART OF AN EXPRESSWAY, 051973This anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Catalogers, Adult Services Librarians, Youth Librarians, Managers

This librarian works at a library with 200+ staff members in a rural area in the Pacific Northwest US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ more than 100, but less than 200

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Experience!! I see far too many LIS degree-holders applying for professional, supervisory roles who have no idea how to even shelve a book. I also see too many lazy mistakes, such as leaving the name of the previous library system on the cover letter, rather than my system’s name – this earns an automatic trip to the trash can without further review.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

In my system, we can ask that HR weed through the initial glut of applications if we feel we will be overwhelmed, but they certainly don’t automatically weed them. The rubrics for weeding are the base qualifications listed in the job posting: years experience, possession of a degree, etc. A hiring committee is formed for each position, usually consisting of the Library Manager, the supervisor for the position, an Admin employee, and sometimes a Library Manager from a neighboring library.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Another applicant has a particular skill set that we are looking for, more experience, or we simply feel they articulated who they are in their cover letter/resume better than the eliminated applicant. We are not only looking for hard skills (MS Office, Overdrive experience, etc) but also soft skills (customer service, experience defusing difficult patron interactions, etc) AND if they will be a good fit for our organization (personality).

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Ask others in the profession to critique their cover letter/resume and participate in a formal mentorship program.

I want to hire someone who is

passionate

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 200+

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ I don’t know

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

We do not require experience, but it is just what happens in practice.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

Librarianship is changing into a community connections field, where we connect people with other people or services that can benefit them (whether connecting a bunch of knitters together for a craft group or helping the homeless find food, shelter, and jobs). However, if we aren’t smart about how we maneuver into this change, we can quickly be deemed irrelevant or useless.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 200+ staff members, Public, Rural area, State of the Job Market 2015