Tag Archives: librarians

Over confidence. If you haven’t been in charge of a budget before don’t claim experience you don’t have

Egyptologist and Librarian Hans Ostenfeld Lange and his wife Joanna

 

This anonymous interview is with a librarian who has been a hiring manager.

This person works at a public library with 10-50 staff members.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

Leadership potential
Organization
Good Work Ethic
(Excluding an MLS of course)

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

Someone who has confidence and proven abilities is easy to spot. They have confidence in themselves and are excited by the many opportunities to serve others our profession has to offer. A dealbreaker is someone who is blasé and simply looking to change careers. They’ve done X for 20yrs, enjoy reading and so they’ve completed their MLS with absolutely no passion for what we do nor have any relevant experience (intern or volunteering or OJT). What we do is serve people. Period. We do it in many different ways and in many different libraries, but it is universal. If you aren’t excited about the ability to do that – you aren’t for me.

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Too many over the top action words related to skills, which can’t be backed up in the previous job employment section. If you’re just out of school -own it. Write down “willing to learn and expand on my skills of “.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

What they love about our profession. Why they want to be a librarian.
I know you’ve got the degree, but I want to know why you want to be a librarian

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Only one!

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ Two is ok, but no more

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ .docx

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ I don’t care

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ As an attachment only

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Genuine love of people as we discuss what the job entails. It shouldn’t be a surprise to you that we serve people and there shouldn’t be any surprises that your job (at whatever level) is about people first and foremost.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

Over confidence. If you haven’t been in charge of a budget before don’t claim experience you don’t have especially if your resume tells me you are right out of school.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

Not at all, however I’ve only been here 7 yrs.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

Apply for anything and everything. Don’t wait for the right job to come to you, go out to find it and be willing to move to get it.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses to this survey.

If you’re someone who has participated in hiring library workers, take this survey and share your viewpoint.

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Original Survey, Public

I don’t think most cataloging classes really teach people how to deal with the variety of materials

Alma Public School - opening of new playground for infants departmentThis anonymous interview is with a federal librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Reference librarians, catalog librarians, electronic resources librarians, technical services librarians, access services librarians

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Northeastern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Vocabulary Design
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Metadata
√ Digital Collections
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Outreach
√ Marketing
√ Instruction
√ Soft Skills (e.g. Communication, Interpersonal Relations)
√ Field Work/Internships

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

It seems that a good number of MLIS candidates are coming into it as a second career with no actual experience in a library. That can lead to inflated expectations about what the work actually entails. Lack of experience also puts them at a real disadvantage when they apply for professional jobs and other applicants have the MLIS plus experience. In this age of job cuts, a lot of managers simply do not have the time to train a new hire from the ground up.

I would say, based on things I have seen at one local library school, that the program seemed to lack real technical courses and was too much based in theory.

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ Other: It depends! Maybe the skills gained through coursework are more up to date and sophisticated than something done in a student job. However, I have a bit of a bias for real-world skills.

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

I don’t think most cataloging classes really teach people how to deal with the variety of materials a cataloger works on (I’m a cataloger). Same is true for reference–I think that conducting a reference interview in real time is something that can’t really be taught in a class.

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Internship or practicum
√ Other: Some of these experiences would be very good for people who want to work in academia (presentation experience and publications), but I wouldn’t expect someone right out of library school to necessarily have those skills.

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

None that I can think of.

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

None that I can think of … except if the program was entirely online, I would be a bit hesitant. I’m old school enough to think that there is real benefit in at least some face to face time with the instructor. There is a real benefit in a live classroom experience in terms of learning to work in teams (because librarians are constantly working together in internal working groups and so on and you have to learn to play nice). I am not saying that the classes all have to be held in person, but I do think that at least some classroom attendance is a good thing.

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

If you don’t have any experience, get some–as a volunteer or in a paid position, no matter how humble. If you cannot get this experience, then a practicum/internship is absolutely a MUST. Take all the technical classes offered … and for Pete’s sake, take cataloging classes even if they are not required! The one database that every library has is the catalog–it is just as important to master as Lexis or ProQuest. Plus, you might well end up in really small library where you HAVE to be a jack of all trades. And if someone is interested in cataloging, be sure to take taxonomy and metadata courses.

Do you have any other comments, for library schools or students, or about the survey?

The job situation now is completely different than when I graduated from my MLIS program in 1985. There are a lot of MLIS graduates now who got into a lot of debt to get the degree and cannot find a professional job. It’s really sad. I guess the big thing is, be REALLY sure you want to do this before getting taking on a lot of debt to get the degree. Talk to librarians and find out what the work is really like if you haven’t had any experience before getting into the program.

Also, being geographically flexible is essential, certainly at first.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshallfrom Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

1 Comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Northeastern US, Urban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

we ‘say’ we do national searches, but we know that people won’t move to NYC for a library job

Keene High School (old) Students, Keene, New HampshireThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. The respondent also listed that he/she has been a department chair and library director. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

reference librarians
cataloger – we only have 1
branch librarians in music, architecture, science, engineering, visual resources

Regardless of what title we hire into, every librarian teaches in our Information Literacy program and every librarian acts as a subject liaison for one or more areas. If they don’t know it, they have to learn it.

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Northeastern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

4

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Grant Writing
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Digital Collections
√ Research Methods
√ Outreach
√ Marketing
√ Instruction
√ Soft Skills (e.g. Communication, Interpersonal Relations)

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

HR skills – supervision and evaluation of non-professional staff/student staff

pedagogy – teaching effectively

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

perfecting the art of the reference interview
the technical skills they need to deal with our web presence
budgeting
assessing and functioning within the prevailing political climate
time management

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Internship or practicum
√ Professional organization involvement
√ Teaching assistant/Other instructional experience

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

None – NYC is an anomaly – we ‘say’ we do national searches, but we know that people won’t move to NYC for a library job (at the prevailing salary scale) unless there is some motivating factor to do so. All our searches end up as de facto regional searches for that reason, so we are telescoped down to graduates of the schools in the area – Rutgers being about the furthest away.

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

No, but there is a concern now about the Queens College program which is appealing its accreditation review. Let’s hope they get their act together.

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Learn time management, and be as flexible as possible. Get some real world experience. If you aren’t already, become web and social media savvy.

Make sure to understand that if your chosen career path is academic libraries, you will probably be pursuing additional higher education – our university requires two master’s degrees – and be prepared to make the sacrifices necessary to undertake that additional education.

Do you have any other comments, for library schools or students, or about the survey?

I believe leadership ability is one of the most critical skills for success as a librarian today. Any training one can acquire to develop it is worth doing. Flexibility, creative thinking and common sense will go a long way in any library position as well.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshallfrom Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Northeastern US, Urban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

Take a cataloging course.

N.S.W Primary Schools' Rugby Leauge Football Team v Queensland Brisbane, 1932This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

catalogers

This librarian works at a library with 50-100 staff members in an urban area in the Southern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Metadata
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Instruction

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

cataloging; research methods

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ Yes–I value skills gained through a student job more highly

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Take a research methods course. Take a cataloging course.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshallfrom Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 50-100 staff members, Academic, Southern US, Urban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

supervision can only be learned by doing

Keene High School (old) Graduating Class of 1875, Keene, New HampshireThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Ref., instruction and the like

This librarian works at a library with 200+ staff members in an urban area in the Western US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ History of Books/Libraries
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Information Behavior
√ Services to Special Populations
√ Outreach
√ Marketing
√ Instruction
√ Soft Skills (e.g. Communication, Interpersonal Relations)
√ Field Work/Internships

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

project management; sense of the importance of the history of our profession

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ Yes–I value skills gained through a student job more highly

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

supervision can only be learned by doing.
experience also (one hopes) brings a greater appreciation of the ‘big picture’ that can only come after years in the field

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Internship or practicum
√ Professional organization involvement
√ Teaching assistant/Other instructional experience

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

no pref

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

no

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

practicum or internship is very important! Also, getting involved in a professional association is helpful. Try to get to a conference even a local one.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshallfrom Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 200+ staff members, Academic, Urban area, Western US, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

some graduates have not dealt with patrons before

Public Schools Athletic League (LOC)This anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager.

This librarian works at a library with 200+ staff members in an suburban area in the Midwestern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ You can’t teach the job skills I need in library school

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

5

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Programming (Events)
√ Reference
√ Readers’ Advisory
√ Services to Special Populations
√ Outreach
√ Soft Skills (e.g. Communication, Interpersonal Relations)
√ Other: Library maintenance you know how many toilets I’ve unclogged!

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

I really think internships should be required some graduates have not dealt with patrons before

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ Yes–I value skills gained through a student job more highly

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

Most things you learned you won’t use!

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Internship or practicum

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

Have they worked in a library? Writing papers and presenting is great but do they have experience?

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

No

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

get in a library!!!! Know if you are a manager of any type you will become a janitor, negotiator, complaint listener etc.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshallfrom Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 200+ staff members, Midwestern US, Public, Suburban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

Put those customer service jobs, like barista or store clerk, on your resume, especially if you held those positions for a long time

Librarian by Flickr user Super Furry Librarian

 

This anonymous interview is with a librarian who has been a member of a hiring committee.

This person works at an academic library with 0-10 staff members.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

- Solid employment history – few short-term positions, no or few gaps
– Library experience, even if it’s just an internship
– Technology skills

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

If you show up and dress or act unprofessionally (e.g. chewing gum, sloppy clothing), I have a hard time getting past that.

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

I know you are applying for a job in a library, but I don’t care that you love to read. Lots of people love to read, but that doesn’t make them qualified for a position that involves customer service, technology skills, instructional abilities, etc.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

Put those customer service jobs, like barista or store clerk, on your resume, especially if you held those positions for a long time. Customer service skills are a big part of librarianship.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Two is ok, but no more

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ As many as it takes, but keep it short and sweet

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ No preference, as long as I can open it

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ I don’t care

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ As an attachment only

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses to this survey.

If you’re someone who has participated in hiring library workers, take this survey and share your viewpoint.

Leave a comment

Filed under 0-10 staff members, Academic, Original Survey

Change management and the ability to implement innovation are vital skills for the future of the profession.

school children in japanThis anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Public librarians – children’s, information, housebound services, adult services

This librarian works at a library with 50-100 staff members in an urban area in Australia/New Zealand.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Metadata
√ Research Methods
√ Information Behavior
√ Field Work/Internships

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

Often the focus is on best practice for the profession, but little to address the gap that lies between this best practice and the realities of the industry. Change management and the ability to implement innovation are vital skills for the future of the profession.

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ Yes–I value skills gained through a student job more highly

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

Customer service
Manual handling
Staff management
Events programming

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Internship or practicum

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

None.

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

No.

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Do what you have do to pass, but go out there and get as much experience as you can in the field, even if you have to volunteer to get it.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshallfrom Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 50-100 staff members, Australia/New Zealand, Public, Urban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

Authors’ Corners: A Job Hunter’s Booklist

I’m so grateful to the authors on this list, who took the time to work with me to create a post that shared their views and knowledge (Just click the title).  If you wanted to create a library for LIS job hunters, here’s where I’d start:

de Stricker, Ulla & Jill Hurst-Wahl. (2011). The Information and Knowledge Professional’s Career Handbook: Define and Create Your Success. Chandos Publishing.

Dority, G. Kim. (2012). LIS Career Sourcebook: Managing and Maximizing Every Step of Your Career. Libraries Unlimited.

Doucett, Elisabeth. (2010). What They Don’t Teach You in Library School. ALA Editions.

Kane, Laura. (2011). Working in the Virtual Stacks: The New Library & information Science. ALA.

Kane, Laura. (2003). Straight From the Stacks: A Firsthand Guide to Careers in Library and Information Science. ALA Editions.

Lowe-Wincentsen, Dawn, & Linda Crook. (2010). Mid-Career Library and Information Professionals: A Leadership Primer. Chandos Publishing.

Luster, Celma Faria. (2013). Extra-Help Librarians . Open Vista Press.

Markgren, Susanne, & Tiffany Eatman Allen. (2013). Career Q&A: A Librarian’s Real-Life, Practical Guide to Managing a Successful Career. Information Today.

Matarazzo, James M., & Toby Pearlstein. (2013). Special Libraries: A Survival Guide. Libraries Unlimited.

Monson, Jane. (2013). Jump-Start Your Career as a Digital Librarian: A LITA Guide. ALA Techsource.

Neely, Teresa. (2011). How to Stay Afloat in the Academic Library Job Pool. ALA Editions.

Shontz, Priscilla K. & Richard A. Murray. (2012). What Do Employers Want? A Guide for Library Science Students. Libraries Unlimited.

Smallwood, Carol, Kerol Harrod & Vera Gubnitskaia. (2013). Continuing Education for Librarians: Workshops, Conferences, College, and Other Ways. McFarland.

Stickell, Lois, & Bridgette Sanders. (2013). Making the Most of Your Library Career. ALA Editions.

Woodward, Jeanette. (2011). A Librarian’s Guide to an Uncertain Job Market. American Library Association.

And now you tell me – what books have I missed?  

Leave a comment

Filed under Author's Corner, Guest Posts, News and Administration

not unless a for-profit school starts awarding MLIS degrees

Blumengart School Children 1963This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

right now, just paraprofessionals and student workers
in the past, children’s and teen librarians, cataloging/processing/receiving parapros, administrative library workers, digital resources (coding) librarians

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a city/town in the Midwestern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Grant Writing
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Programming (Events)
√ Programming (Coding)
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Metadata
√ Digital Collections
√ Information Behavior
√ Soft Skills (e.g. Communication, Interpersonal Relations)

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ Yes–I value skills gained through a student job more highly

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

specifics of library procedure (varies by institution)

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Internship or practicum

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

I don’t think any particular school gives an edge

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

not unless a for-profit school starts awarding MLIS degrees

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

get real life experience – work in a library(ies) while you’re in school

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshallfrom Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, City/town, Midwestern US, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School