Monthly Archives: November 2014

Being more awesome. And diligent and prepared.

OP_82 US Cavalry Hunting for Illicit Stills in SC 1870This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for less than six months. This person is looking in academic, archives, library vendors/service providers, public, school, and special libraries, at the following levels: entry level, requiring at least two years of experience, supervisory,branch manager. Here is this person’s experience with internships/volunteering:

Teacher Certificate, English Lit.
Peace Corps
Two year internship at Public Library, preparation for all librarian duties.

This job hunter is in a city/town in the Midwestern US and is willing to move two hours in any direction.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Location. Job fit-experiences and interests.

Where do you look for open positions?

INALJ, specific library sites, LibJobs, idealist, Library Joblist, Indeed.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other:Yes, but that’s not a primary indicator of fitness.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Not quite sure yet. Ten hours?

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Michigan Library Association should stop charging posters. They have an awful list, and I assume this is a reason why.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Being more awesome. And diligent and prepared.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US

I feel graduates from online only schools suffer from lack of camaraderie and group study experiences.

N.S.W Primary Schools' Rugby Leauge Football Team v Queensland Brisbane, 1932This anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Reference

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a city/town in the Western US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

4

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Library Management
√ Metadata
√ History of Books/Libraries
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Services to Special Populations
√ Marketing
√ Field Work/Internships

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

How to troubleshoot/fix a copier/printer/ technology device.

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ Yes–I value skills gained through a student job more highly

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

Out of the box thinking. Communication skills with diverse (ethnically and economically) patrons. Excellent writing skills. Basic Cataloging, Reference, and Web, skills. We can teach much of the rest.

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Other publication

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

They are all equal, though I prefer students from bricks and mortar schools over online only schools.

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

Not really, though I feel graduates from online only schools suffer from lack of camaraderie and group study experiences. They do too much learning in a personal vacuum..

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Work, as much as possible, in diverse settings, to know what you are getting into, and help you choose the best environment for you.

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Public, Western US, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

Be willing to expend the effort and resources to offer the position full-time, with benefits, at a truly competitive salary.

Hunting with Texas Jim Mitchell and friends in the Florida EvergladesThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is not currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for less than six months. This person is looking in academic, library vendors/service providers, public, and special libraries, at the following levels: entry level, requiring at least two years of experience. Here is this person’s experience with internships/volunteering:

I volunteered for almost a year doing programming for a large public library. I also worked for a year on the reference desk at a combined public and academic library. And I worked for two and a half years in the Technical Services/Acquisitions department of a large academic library, during which I also helped digitize archival materials.

This job hunter is in an urban area in the Western US and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1) Entry-level, or that I can meet the qualifications with the experience I currently have
2) Includes Reference work, as that is what I am most interested in
3) Full-time with benefits much preferred

Where do you look for open positions?

inalj.com, ALA Joblist, professional listservs (RUSA, GLBTRT, etc.)

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I first find a job posting I really like, then I look into the organization via their website and web presence, then I work on creating a cover letter tailored to the required and preferred qualifications in the job ad. Once that is done, I fill out the application and write up answers for any supplemental questions I encounter, check my work and application, and submit everything. After the application has been submitted, I contact each of my references to let them know about the job I have applied for and provide them with information they might find useful when giving a reference for me for that specific job. I always set aside an entire day to complete the process for one job application. The time it takes me ranges from 3 to 5 hours.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be willing to expend the effort and resources to offer the position full-time, with benefits, at a truly competitive salary. Make it known that professional development is supported and encouraged. Be clear about what the best person for the position will be expected to do on the job–but don’t make those qualifications impossible for one single person to meet or possess.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Provide information about the approximate expected start date, to give applicants an idea of the time-frame to potential employment with them.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Being able to communicate your skills well, and interacting in an open and friendly manner with anyone you come into contact with from the organization. It’s about being able to show how well you’ll fit in with others in the organization, as well as how well you’ll be able to do the job.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under Job hunter's survey, Urban area, Western US

Actual reference interviewing.

Public Schools Athletic League (LOC)This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

catalogers, subject specialists

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Northeastern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Grant Writing
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Metadata
√ Archives
√ History of Books/Libraries
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Readers’ Advisory
√ Information Behavior
√ Marketing
√ Instruction
√ Field Work/Internships

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

writing

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

actual reference interviewing.

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Internship or practicum
√ Student organization involvement
√ Teaching assistant/Other instructional experience

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

UIUC, UWashington, UNC-Chapel Hill

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

Pace?

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Northeastern US, Urban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

Being a librarian means continuing to learn new skills for the rest of your life.

Keene High School (old) Graduating Class of 1875, Keene, New HampshireThis anonymous interview is with a law firm librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Assistant Librarian at the law firm

This librarian works at a library with 0-10 staff members in an urban area in the Northeastern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Metadata
√ Digital Collections
√ Archives
√ History of Books/Libraries
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Marketing
√ Instruction
√ Field Work/Internships

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

Often soft skills are missing and that’s not something that can really be taught in Library School. Not sure how to address this. If the person is intelligent and can communicate and has a solid background in library theory from school then I can train them/teach them the on the job skills. That said if the person is going to be working as a solo librarian or mostly on their own then they are going to need to have prior practical work experience of some sort.

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

Local practices at the particular library
Experience working with real live patrons
Experience working with a particular library computer system or online catalog system (as opposed to having knowledge of how they work or experience working with a different system)

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Internship or practicum
√ Student organization involvement
√ Professional organization involvement

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Do an Internship or Practicum! Work in the library on campus if you can. Then take as many and varied courses as you can. If you determine what “specialty” you’d like to be in — and don’t do that too soon — then take more classes in that area. It’s more important to learn how to learn new skills than it is to try and learn everything — particularly in technology which is constantly changing. Know where and how you can keep up to date once you graduate. I know HTML and web design because I’ve taken courses and taught myself — these things didn’t even exist when I was in library school, but knowing how computers think and having some experience with them in school laid the foundation for future learning.

Do you have any other comments, for library schools or students, or about the survey?

Being a librarian means continuing to learn new skills for the rest of your life. You need to demonstrate that you are interested in doing this and have the ability to do this. Your library degree is the foundation, and it should be a strong one, but it is not the be all and end all of your career

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

Special Note: From December 6, 2013 to October 24, 2014, the ALA will accept comments on the Draft revised Standards for Accreditation of Master’s Programs in Library and Information Studies. More information about the process of changing these standards is here. If you have opinions about what people should be learning in library school, here’s a way that you can influence change.

Do you hire librarians? Tell us, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

Leave a comment

Filed under 0-10 staff members, Northeastern US, Special, Urban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

only posted vacancies and conducted interviews when they are certain that they have the funding to hire new people.

Hunting with Texas Jim Mitchell and friends in the Florida EvergladesThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for less than six months. This person is looking in academic libraries, library vendor/service provides, special libraries, and law firms at the following levels: Requiring at least two years of experience.

This job hunter is in an urban area in the Southern US and is not willing to move.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1) Utilizing the skills I’ve learned in library school and/or builds upon them.
2) A job I can see myself being content with staying for at least 3-5 years.
3) A position that is a step up from the clerical, entry level positions that I’ve had for the past 5 years since graduating college.

Where do you look for open positions?

I need a library job, grad school listserv, Libgig, code4library jobs, USAjobs.gov, Careers in Federal Libraries listserv, LLSDC jobs.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ I would like there to be, but often times there isn’t and sometimes I apply anyway if the organization and job description sounds promising.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

About an hour at least. I edit my standard resume to include key words and phrases included in the job listing and make sure relevant skills and experience is included and highlighted. For federal jobs, I usually need to submit additional forms, a copy of my unofficial graduate school transcript, my most recent SF-50 form, or anything the job listing says is required. Before I submit everything, I double check to make sure I’ve included everything that’s required (i.e. resume, forms, recommendations, transcripts, etc.).

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Definitely advertise on graduate school listservs, that’s usually my first or second point of contact that I hear about vacancies. Even if it’s not a job I’m personally interested in, I sometimes forward them to friends or former classmates who I think would be interested.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

It would be great if employers only posted vacancies and conducted interviews when they are certain that they have the funding to hire new people. I’ve applied and interviewed for a library in a government organization, and was told three weeks after the interview (after waiting over a month for a call back) that the position would not be filled due to budget cut backs. I understand it’s a precarious time for most government entities to know for certain what their staffing budget will be down the road, but it’s made me more cautious to apply for public sector jobs when I know it takes so long to hear back from them and not know if they will still be able to hire a new person by the time the second or first round of interviews happen.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Persistence, a positive attitude, and flexibility. Personal appearance and personality also helps.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under Job hunter's survey, Southern US, Urban area

It would be nice if potential employers made us feel like people instead of numbers

Goose hunting in Klamath County, Oregon, OSU Special Collections via Flickr CommonsThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for more than 18 months. This person is looking in archives, public libraries, school libraries, and museums at the entry level. Here is this person’s experience with internships/volunteering:

I did one internship in a public library, one in an archive, and I volunteered in a museum archive.

This job hunter is in an urban area in the Western US and is willing to move almost anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

I think everything I’m looking for could be summed in one phrase: a good fit.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I copy the list of required and desirable qualifications and then use that as a template for a cover letter–I try to cover everything on the list in my cover letter and/or resume. I also spend a certain amount of time researching the location to try to determine if I could really live there.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ The interview itself–how it’s conducted, the people i meet, etc.

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Specifics. Also, so many job ads sound and look the same, when I see an ad with a little personality, it catches my eye.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Please please communicate with us! Obviously I want to hear the decision after an interview (which doesn’t always happen), but it would also be nice to know when my application will not be selected for any part of the hiring process. I often put a lot of effort into those applications and have high hopes only to wait months before concluding that I must not have made it past the first cut.

It would be nice if potential employers made us feel like people instead of numbers.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under Job hunter's survey, Urban area, Western US

Further Questions: Is it appropriate to reach out to the organization and ask for feedback on my application materials?

This week we asked people who hire librarians a question submitted by a reader, who asks:

I applied for a position a month ago and it was relisted today with the same job description.  Is it appropriate to reach out to the organization and ask for feedback on my application materials so I can know why I wasn’t a strong candidate?  Would reapplying with a different cover letter make a difference?

Laurie PhillipsYes, I would reach out to the organization and ask for feedback. If they’re willing to be honest and you do have the qualifications but didn’t somehow address them correctly or in a way they expected, then you could reapply and address those issues head-on. Reapplying without that feedback probably wouldn’t help unless you ask someone who can be objective to look at it with you and help you rework your letter.

– Laurie Phillips, Associate Dean for Technical Services, J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library, Loyola University New Orleans

There may be several things at play here that may have nothing to do with your being a strong candidate depending upon the organization. It could be something as basic as the job ad wasn’t exactly the same in all the places the organization posted it which could be an equity and diversity issue so they may have had to pull the position and repost it to correct the error. They may or may not contact applicants to tell them to reapply.

 

If you do plan to reapply for the position, I don’t know that it is appropriate for you to ask for feedback on your application materials, at my institution at least, that would be inappropriate from an equity standpoint and I would not be able to give you feedback until the search is concluded. You could contact them to see if you can find out anything about why the position was closed and reopened. They may or may not be able to give you that information.

 

If your cover letter addressed your experience for the minimum and preferred qualifications and those haven’t changed your cover letter should still be appropriate, if you are using a general introductory cover letter, then, yes, I would recommend rewriting it to address the qualifications required in the position.

– Julie Leuzinger, Department Head, Eagle Commons Library, University of North Texas

Thank you as always to our contributors for their time and insight.  If you’re someone who hires librarians and are interested in participating in this feature, please email us at hiringlibrariansquestionsATgmail.com.

Thank YOU for reading!  If you liked reading, you’re going to really love COMMENTING.

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Filed under Further Questions

Job Hunter Follow Up: Kari Bhagat

Kari Bhagat took the Job Hunter’s survey on June 18, 2014. Her responses appeared as They weren’t honest in telling me that they wanted someone with more experience.

Your Background

How long has it been since you got your library degree?

I actually don’t have my degree yet. I’m finishing my last class this semester, so I’ll finish around the time I start my new job.

How many years of library work experience do you have?

About 3.5 years

How many years of work experience outside of libraries do you have?

I have about 2.5 years of non-library experience

How old are you? 

I’m almost 24!

Your Job Hunt

How long did it take you before you found your job?

Six months- but I started really early

How many positions did you apply to?

I don’t know the actual number but my guess is that it’s somewhere around 20-30

How many interviews did you go on?

I interviewed for six different positions, but some of those had multiple rounds of interviewing

What was your work situation while you were job hunting?

I was in school, working full time

Were you volunteering anywhere?

No

Did you travel for interviews? If so, who paid?

I did travel for one interview- I paid for it initially, and they paid me back when they didn’t offer me the job

Did you decline any offers?

No, but there were definitely a few that I would have

Your Job

What’s your new job?

Information Architecture Librarian with a contractor for the EPA

Is your job full or part time? Permanent or temporary?

Permanent full time job

Did you relocate? If so, who paid?

I did relocate. I paid for the relocation, but they bumped my salary a bit in consideration of this, since their company policy is to no offer relocation assistance.

How did you find the listing for your job?

I found it on the Special Libraries Association Careers site

Did you meet all of the required qualifications? How many of the desired qualifications?

I met all but two of the required qualifications

What was the application process like? How many interviews did you do?

The application process becomes pretty streamlined once you get into a rhythm, especially when you’re applying to similar jobs. All in all, I was on 11 interviews, I think.

How did you prepare for the interview(s)?

I would always look over the job description and my cover letter and resumes, and try to think of any questions they might ask me, and how I might respond.

Did you know anyone in the organization that hired you? If so, how?

I did not.

Is your job commensurate with your skills, experience and expectations?

Yes

Is the pay scale higher or lower than you were looking for?

It was higher, but part of that is the relocation bump that they added into my salary.

What do you think was the biggest obstacle in your job hunt? How did you overcome it?

For me it was not having my degree yet. I just did my best to sell myself in the cover letter as being the best candidate for the job, and luckily a few people were willing to consider someone with one semester left of school.

What set you apart from the other applicants? Why did they hire you?

I think I had a lot of the experience they were looking for

State of the Job Market

What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve seen on a job announcement?

I’ve seen jobs that said: Second masters required, doctoral degree preferred.

What was your favorite interview question? What was the worst?

I don’t know if I have a favorite interview question. My least favorite questions are the vague questions, like “ Someone is being disruptive in the library- what do you do?” For me, the answer to that question depends on how they’re being disruptive; I need more details.

Any good horror stories for us?

No real horror stories, but during one video interview I had with several different offices at once, the manager told me to leave the interview mid-interview to go get water, it was super awkward.

Has job hunting been a positive or negative experience, for the most part?

I’d say negative overall, because aside from actually getting a new job, you have months of not hearing anything, and reading job descriptions that want you to have the expertise to do everything. And even when you apply for those jobs, knowing no one can do everything, knowing you weren’t even selected, because as unique and wonderful as you think you are, there clearly is someone out there with better experience on their resume/cover letter they they decided to interview over you.

Would you change your answer to “what’s the secret to getting hired”?

It’s certainly a tough market out there. Get as much experience pre-graduation as you can. I think that’s one of the things that helped with me. Also, make the most out of every job. the job might not be doing much, but then offer to take on a new and exciting project in something that interests you, and make that your experience in that area. Use what may seem like a boring, dull, job (or maybe not so boring) at first, into an exciting job that’s now a jumping off point for something you care a lot about and want to continue to do after school.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Not really. Networking is always great, but I never end up getting my jobs that way.

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Filed under Job Hunter Follow Up

They weren’t honest in telling me that they wanted someone with more experience

This interview originally appeared on July 1, 2014.  A follow-up with Ms. Bhagat will appear shortly.

Dhruti “Kari” Bhagat is currently employed as Library Technician and Website Content Strategist for the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals Library. She is working on redesigning the library’s webpage right now, and is very proud to get that project going and to be the driving force behind it. Ms. Bhagat was also Vice President of Simmons’ Student Chapter of SLA from Spring of 2013 through the Spring of 2014. She has been looking for a new position for less than six months. She is looking in academic libraries, library vendors/service providers, public,and special libraries, at the following levels: entry level, requiring at least two years of experience. Ms. Bhagat says:

I have gotten a lot from the part-time work I had during graduate school- it was extremely helpful.

She is in an urban area, in the Northeastern US, and is willing to move anywhere. As a hobby, she prints and binds out-of-copyright books. You can learn more about her on LinkedIn

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

-different types of work but challenging
– A great organizational culture that wants its employees to be innovative and grow
– Some sense of job security for at least a year or two

Where do you look for open positions?

-ALA Joblist
-Indeed
-SLA.org
-AALLnet.org
-MBLC
-Simmons Jobline
-Linkedin

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I usually spend a little time on my resume, making sure it includes the most relevant information for the position. The cover letter usually takes me a couple of hours, spread out over a few days. I usually start froma cover letter that I’ve already written for a similar job and change the parts that need to be changed, but I always tailor the cover letter to the job, so I’m not just cut and pasting.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: Technically yes, but I listed myself with a role that I technically didn’t officially have, but I was already doing. I called myself the deputy webmaster, because we already had a webmaster, but I was doing all of the web maintainance and work on it. I had even asked my boss about it but she never got back to me, despite me following up with her about it repeatedly.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Making some of the application systems a lot easier. Some universities makes you fill out your entire employment history in these long forms, even though you’re just going to upload your resume anyway. Some universities don’t and it cuts down on the time by a lot.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

I think being honest about why I didn’t get the job would be nice. I was recently told that I didn’t get the job because they decided to hire someone else. Then a week later, I saw the job posted on a bunch of the job sites I go to (with a higher salary than I was asking for). I just felt confused about the fact that they weren’t honest in telling me that they wanted someone with more experience.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Well, I hope it’s being confident in your abilities and stressing how willing you are to learn, but what do I know? I’m still looking for a job.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Urban area