Monthly Archives: December 2014

Job Hunter Follow Up Year Two: Ryan Dreier

Ryan Dreier
Ryan Dreier took the Job Hunter’s survey on December 31, 2012 . His responses appeared as Appeal to Library Schools. We then followed up with him on January 22nd, 2014.

Your Job

What’s your current work situation? 

I work as a Page and Volunteer Coordinator at a public library.

Did you relocate for your job? If so, who paid?

Yes, though I moved in with my partner so there was little relocation costs. I paid for the cost.

How did you find the listing for your job?

I believe that I found the listing on inalj.com.

Did you meet all of the required qualifications? How many of the desired qualifications?

Yes, I met all the required qualifications. The only desired qualification that I didn’t meet was having previous work experience in a library setting.

What was the application process like? How many interviews did you do?

I had one interview with three current staff members.

How did you prepare for the interview(s)?

I prepared for a few hours, I was nervous about specific questions regarding library automation systems which I had little experience with.

Did you know anyone in the organization that hired you? If so, how?

I didn’t know anyone!

Is your job commensurate with your skills, experience and expectations?

Yes.

Is the pay scale higher or lower than you were looking for?

About what I was looking for. It was a full time position with benefits, so that influenced my decision to take the position.

What do you think was the biggest obstacle in your job hunt? How did you overcome it?

Getting the experience in a library. I overcame this obstacle because I had a lot of experience working with and managing volunteers. A component of the position that the library was really looking to strengthen.

What set you apart from the other applicants? Why did they hire you?

I think it was my experience working for a non-profit and the large base of volunteers in which I was able to successfully manage. I also had recently acquired my MLIS.

Your Job Hunt

How long did it take to find your job?

After getting my MLIS it took me two and a half months. However, my current position is a paraprofessional position that does not require the degree.

How many positions did you apply to?

After completing my proficiency exam to get my MLIS, I probably applied to roughly 12 different positions, both full and part time.

How many interviews did you go on?

One.

What was your work situation while you were job hunting?

I worked full time at a large non-profit. I was responsible for special events and volunteer services at that organization.

Were you volunteering anywhere?

I volunteered the summer of 2009 at a public library. I has also recently completed a 150 hour internship at an academic library.

Did you travel for interviews? If so, who paid?

It was within driving distance, but I paid.

Did you decline any offers?

No.

State of the Job Market

What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve seen on a job announcement?

I was fortunate to secure a job shortly after gaining my MLIS, so nothing really stands out.

What was your favorite interview question? What was the worst?

The general questions about a time in which I worked on a project? I liked this question because I had sooo many examples from my previous position. So in a certain way this question really helped to boost my confidence in the interview. My least favorite was “Why should I hire you?” I think that like between confidence and arrogance can get pretty thin, and it’s also awkward tooting your horn over applicants you know nothing about.

Any good horror stories for us?

While I was still in school getting my Master’s degree I had an interview for a position as an Adult Services Librarian in which they asked me to demonstrate how to download an e-book to a nook. The nook died. So then they gave me a kindle. I have the kindle app installed on my iPhone so when I went to log in to my account and download a book, the title downloaded to my phone, which I left in my car so it wouldn’t be a distraction. Fail!

Has job hunting been a positive or negative experience, for the most part?

It was good, but only after getting invited to interview. I remember being frustrated in applying for jobs that I felt overqualified for, and nevering getting a call to interview..

Would you change your answer to “what’s the secret to getting hired”?

I’m not sure that I would, but I got hired despite not knowing anyone who works at the library, so it’s all a mystery to me.

What’s your ideal work situation?

I think ideally I would like to work as either a Teen Librarian or in an academic library as an ILL Librarian.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Hmmm, I think my appeal to my current position was the fact that it would provide me with an opportunity to gain experience working in a library setting. I hope to advance into a professional position at some point.

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Job Hunter Follow Up: Ryan Dreier

This originally posted on January 22, 2014. A year two follow up will post in just a few moments.
Ryan DreierRyan Dreier took the Job Hunter’s survey on December 31, 2012 .  His responses appeared as Appeal to Library Schools.

Your Background

How long has it been since you got your library degree?

Zero, I will obtain in May 2014

How many years of library work experience do you have?

Zero, some volunteer experience. I have an internship at an academic library lined up for Spring Semester.

How many years of work experience outside of libraries do you have?

Eight, four years for a large non-profit working in volunteer services, four years providing personal care to individuals with developmental disabilities.

How old are you?

Turned 30 this year.

What’s your current work situation?

In school on a part time basis, employed full time.

Are you volunteering anywhere?

Not currently

Your Job Hunt

How long have you been job hunting at this point?

18 months

What kinds of jobs are you currently applying for?

Library jobs, preferably academic. Looking to relocate to the Chicago area.

Approximately how many positions have you applied to?

Honestly, not many 6 to 10, not all of them with libraries.

Approximately how many interviews have you gone on?

Two, one in person, one phone

How do you prepare for interviews?

I’ll review 101 Great Answers to Interview Questions. I’m try to remain relaxed, I get so anxious that I have a hard time communicating and answer interview questions. Sometimes I’ll do a google search and read through indeed articles.

Have you traveled for interviews? If so, who paid?

Yes, I did.

Have you declined any offers?

No

What do you think is the biggest obstacle in your job hunt? How are you working to overcome it?

1. Not having any experience
2. Really looking for a full time position, but I have applied for part time positions

State of the Job Market

What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve seen on a job announcement?

Basically the job announcement talked about a retirement at the library which was the reason for the opening and that the applicant would have big shoes to fill, they would also need how to say no?

What was your favorite interview question? What was the worst?

Least favorite: Why should we hire you?

Has job hunting been a positive or negative experience, for the most part?

Hmmmm, I struggle with this. I’m trying to stay positive. I been fortunate to have some calls without actually completing my degree this spring, so I’m hoping that I’ll be presented with more opportunities at that point.

Would you change your answer to “what’s the secret to getting hired”?

I don’t think I would change it, though I would add that it’s important to stay positive and keep trying.

If you took the Job Hunter’s Survey some time in the last year and are interested in doing a follow-up, even anonymously, please contact me at hiringlibrarians AT gmail.

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Appeal to Library Schools

This post originally appeared on February 10, 2013. I will post a year two follow-up with Ryan in just a few moments.
Ryan DreierRyan Dreier is currently the Volunteer Director at The Salvation Army of Brown County, where over 3,000 volunteers have logged at least one hour of service in 2012! He also works at FedEx Office as a “Generalist.” A librarian in the making, Mr. Dreier will finish his MLIS at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee this year. He has been job hunting for a year to 18 months in academic and public libraries, at the entry level. Of his internship/volunteering experience, he says:

Graduating by the end of summer, have done some volunteer work, no formal internship as I work two jobs to put myself through school without debt

He is in a city/town, in the Midwestern US, and is willing to move within an eight hour drive from home. You can follow him on Twitter @ryonlibraryon. Ryan also says:

Green Bay, WI–GO PACKERS!!!!

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

An opportunity to learn and grow
A position to use my experiences to grow programs
The opportunity to serve the community and share and disseminate information

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist

Libgig

Wisconsin Valley Job Posting Boards

inalj.com

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I usually include my resume, transcript, references, cover letter, and that’s on top of the job application requested by the potential employer

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: Sometimes I feel like its a matter of interpretation on skill assessment surveys

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Other: Commutation of expectations and vision of that specific library

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Appeal to library schools, and post openings

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Provide feedback on what you could do to improve when requested

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I think the secret is that you have to know someone or that full time positions are being filled by paraprofessionals or professionals that are on staff but only working part time, leaving little room to get in.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Stats and Graphs: Hiring Librarians’ 2014 in Review

This is the kind of thing I’m always curious about with other blogs, so here are my auto-generated WordPress stats for you, dear readers.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 250,000 times in 2014. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 11 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Views didn’t quite double, but it’s certainly up over last year.

It’s been an interesting run.  I started this blog in February 2012, so we are coming up on THREE YEARS.

I must admit, I’ve been a bit on Hiring Librarians auto-pilot this year.  Part of it is being less of a one woman show. I’ve had excellent help.  Currently, Sarah Keil is asking and posting the Further Questions series, Jennifer Devine is taking care of transcribing the responses to open surveys, and Sherle Abramson-Bluhm is handling the Resume/CV Review service.   And over the summer a number of folks helped with a big push to get the backlog of survey responses transcribed.   Thank you all!

But another part of my auto-pilotness is that I’m not job hunting, so my personal interest has waned.

Nonetheless, I’m thinking of a new survey, maybe a state of the job market interview with hiring managers.

Or maybe something else?  Any ideas or requests?

 

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Job Hunter Follow Up Year Two: Lauren Read

Lauren ReadLauren Read took the Job Hunter’s survey on December 29, 2012. Her responses appeared as Be Transparent as to Whether You Are Forward-Thinking & Innovative. We last followed up with her on January 29, 2014.

Your Job

What’s your current work situation?

I am a full-time reference librarian for Beaufort County (SC) Library System.

Did you relocate for your job? If so, who paid?

I did follow the job to my new island home (at my expense).

How did you find the listing for your job?

The county was in my long list of public libraries to check periodically for vacancies on their websites.

What was the application process like? How many interviews did you do?

I sent my application, cover letter, and resume to the county government. I was invited to interview (via phone) a few weeks later, received a friendly selection call about a week later, then sent to do a pre-employment screening some time after that.

Did you know anyone in the organization that hired you? If so, how?

Not a soul in the organization — or even the state!

Is the pay scale higher or lower than you were looking for?

It is lower than the starting salary advocated by the American Library Association, but I am satisfied with that for now.

Your Job Hunt

How long did it take to find your job?

5 years

How many positions did you apply to?

about 100 annually

How many interviews did you go on?

I think the fact that I got 4 per year at first but 12 the final year speaks to the economy more than my aptitude.

What was your work situation while you were job hunting?

Over those years, I held mostly individual part-time jobs, working for a coffee shop, a temp agency, a digital marketing firm, a start-up entrepreneur/journalist/activist, and an acupuncture college.

State of the Job Market

What’s the most ridiculous thing you’ve seen on a job announcement?

I [grumble grumble] those announcements for which the decision-makers apparently do not realize the professional standards of the title “librarian” being reserved for ML(I)S holders.

Has job hunting been a positive or negative experience, for the most part?

A long road though it may have been — I believe due to circumstances not of my own fault — it was a great exercise in steadfastness.

What’s your ideal work situation?

Well, I now have a full-time, professional position in a public library in which I serve adults through reference services, programming, and collection development, so I have achieved the ideal for me! In several years’ time, I will seek opportunities to advance my career.

Anything else you want to tell us?

Now that I am settled with gainful employment, my husband and I have welcomed a pair of library lions — I mean, cats — into our home: Patience and Fortitude.

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Job Hunter Follow Up: Lauren Read

This interview originally ran on January 29, 2014. A year two follow up with Lauren will post later today.
Lauren ReadLauren Read took the Job Hunter’s survey on December 29, 2012.  Her responses appeared as Be Transparent as to Whether You Are Forward-Thinking & Innovative.

Your Background

How long has it been since you got your library degree?

4+ years

How many years of library work experience do you have?

5+

How many years of work experience outside of libraries do you have?

10, excluding Summer jobs

How old are you?

32

What’s your current work situation?

marginally employed (16 hours weekly)

Are you volunteering anywhere?

No, although I have manned information booths at festivals– big patronage!

Your Job Hunt

How long have you been job hunting at this point?

I have been in pursuit of a full-time public library job for 5 years now.

What kinds of jobs are you currently applying for?

My focus is on public librarianship. I consider paraprofessional jobs if they are full-time and other types of libraries on a case-by-case basis. Most positions are Librarian I, although I fit the bill and interviewed for a branch manager position recently.

Approximately how many positions have you applied to?

Cumulatively, I am unsure. 110 in 2013

Approximately how many interviews have you gone on?

2013 was a record-breaking year for interviews: 12 (this year).

How do you prepare for interviews?

I peruse the library’s virtual branch (i.e. their website) to learn what materials, resources, programs, and services they offer. I print out and highlight through newsletters and annual reports, if they have them, noting any partnering organizations or other leads I may look further into. This process usually results in a healthy list of questions I will be asking. And I review those typical questions one is asked … one more time. Mirror-rehearsing is reserved for the day of.

Have you traveled for interviews? If so, who paid?

Yes. I consider my savings account “the interview fund.”

Have you declined any offers?

No. That’s crazy talk.

What do you think is the biggest obstacle in your job hunt? How are you working to overcome it?

I believe the obstacle to be competition. I try to stand out through my involvement in NCLA and local community involvement. Although I am willing to relocate, the latter quality will certainly apply to my future home.

Have there been any major changes in your job hunting strategy? Are you doing anything differently than from when we last heard from you?

Lately, I have been able to keep busy with applications while focusing on remaining a North Carolinian, but I am still largely open.

State of the Job Market

What was your favorite interview question? What was the worst?

I just love talking librarianese with my kin. I delight in “what would you do if” questions, but “describe a time when” questions are helpful to the panel though not my favorite to answer.

Any good horror stories for us?

I had to shake off an impression when I pulled into a public library parking lot (to interview) and saw the glaring sign for the gun shop/ shooting range right next door.

Has job hunting been a positive or negative experience, for the most part?

Naturally, I am beyond ready to move to the next stage already. But overall, as with any job, it’s one at which I have reflected on my improved performance over time. Most jobs don’t involve such narrow chances at “winning,” however.

If you took the Job Hunter’s Survey some time in the last year and are interested in doing a follow-up, even anonymously, please contact me at hiringlibrarians AT gmail.

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Be Transparent as to Whether You Are Forward-Thinking & Innovative

This post originally appeared on February 18, 2013. A year two follow up will be posted in just a few moments.
When she was at Rutgers, Lauren Read (MLIS 2009) worked at Montclair (NJ) Public Library, getting a delicious taste of most every department. She then decided to relocate while looking for her first full-time professional job … during the recession.  Ms. Read has been looking for more than 18 months in public libraries at the entry level. This is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

I worked for four part-time years as a public library assistant leading up to the degree.

I had a one-semester internship in a public library reference department.

Ms. Read is in a city/town in the Southern US, and is willing to move anywhere. She keeps active through ALA and PLA conferences and magazines, NCLA networking events and workshops, and countless (free) webinars.  Keeping optimistic happens intrinsically.  Find her at about.me/laread.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Public Librarianship

Professional (as opposed to parapro)

An organization that communicates well and is either innovative or open to having me sweep creative changes

Where do you look for open positions?

Aside from INALJ, I subscribe to vast amounts of job interest cards directly through city/county government websites and have some other bookmarks to gov sites that do not have this service.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

It totally varies, because if it’s through a site (like neogov) where I already have a profile, I just write a cover letter.  Other times I need to hand fill-out an application in addition to everything else that gets mailed in.  And everything in between.  I probably average 45 minutes per application.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

√ To follow-up after an interview

√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be transparent as to whether you are forward-thinking & innovative or a traditional conservative organization.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

I would appreciate being informed of how many people applied and how many were selected for interview.  Sometimes I learn this and feel better about not making it (or indeed making it at least one step)!

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Standing out … in a good way.  Enthusiasm, confidence, and passion!  Carrying oneself well in an interview, speaking clearly and concisely but thoroughly, is also helpful.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Secret to getting a phone interview = Knowing someone at a hiring institution or previous employment/internship with the institution, relevant work experience, excellent cover letter

ConDev5378A Hunting Dog, 1945, Washington County, NCThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, and Special libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience. This job hunter is in a city/town, in the Midwestern US, and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Full time, academic librarian position, and location

Where do you look for open positions?

I look at a few, but i check INALJ.com most often.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I spend at least an thirty minutes exploring the institution’s website and the library’s website to get a feel for the school and also to help me personalize my cover letter. I then carefully read the job ad and connect desired qualifications to my experience. I often write cover letters over a couple days to allow for editing–in total I spend approximately 3-4 hours writing a cover letter.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary
√ Being able to present
√ Other: Meeting with department directors, meeting with library director

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be specific when listing qualifications. Examples of how you define or expect employees to use “emerging technology” or “knowledge of internet” would be much more helpful than just listing vague, generic technology qualifications. Stay open to hiring new graduates, especially those with relevant internships or part-time work experiences before or during graduate school. Include a situational or behavioral question related to the job duties in the online application — this helps me get a better sense of what you are looking for in a candidate and allows me to connect my experience to your expectations more clearly.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Be open about the timeline for application review/interviewing and stick to deadlines, so we know what’s going on. Don’t require candidates to fill out a “past 10 years of work history” section in the online application. In the job ad, state if the applications are reviewed on a rolling basis from the posting date or if they are reviewed only after the application deadline. Always set a “priority given to applications received by” date rather than leaving the deadline open ended.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

For recent graduates: Secret to getting a phone interview = Knowing someone at a hiring institution or previous employment/internship with the institution, relevant work experience, excellent cover letter. And a dash of luck! Secret to getting an in-person interview/getting hired = communication/soft skills, relevant work experiences, confidence, genuine enthusiasm for the position.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses. Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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by | December 28, 2014 · 8:00 am

Students must put in considerable effort to learn past what is lacking in their formal education.

Blumengart School Children 1963This anonymous interview is with a person who, when asked if they were a librarian, responded “It’s complicated” This person works in an academic library and has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Reference Librarians, Access Services, Tech Services, Paraprofessionals

S/he works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Southern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

4

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Grant Writing
√ Project Management
√ Programming (Events)
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Marketing
√ Instruction
√ Soft Skills (e.g. Communication, Interpersonal Relations)
√ Field Work/Internships

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

Marketing, project management, usable instruction techniques, cataloging understandably or how electronic resources operates

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

Reference which is specific to the individual library, though basic skill should come from school or experience. Most MLS programs lack in teaching real instruction techniques to their students, as such this is normally an on-the-job learned skill.

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Internship or practicum

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

I don’t think the program matters as much as the person and how much effort they take to learn past what library schools teach.

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Get a job in a library- any job. Any experience, even as a volunteer, is invaluable when looking for work. Learning skills like web design, coding or any strong computer skills, project management, and having experience as a teacher or speaker will help too. Library school does not teach how to do the job (or even how to do the job well). Students must put in considerable effort to learn past what is lacking in their formal education.

Do you have any other comments, for library schools or students, or about the survey?

no

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses to this survey, or specific analysis of the responses discussing online school, the amount of coursework students should take, and preferences/reluctances for candidates from certain schools.

Do you hire librarians?  Tell us your answer to, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Southern US, Urban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

Don’t believe the myth about the large number of librarians retiring and the impending librarian shortage

Keene High School, (Keene Academy), Keene, New Hampshire

 

This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Public services librarians

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Southern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

4

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Programming (Coding)
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Metadata
√ Digital Collections
√ Research Methods
√ Outreach
√ Marketing

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

How to market the library as in developing meaningful relationships with other departments, the community, etc.

The importance of interconnectedness between various library departments. It is not “us” vs. “them”.

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

Library instruction
Library programming (Events)
Perfecting the reference interview
Some soft skills

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Internship or practicum

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

It depends on the requirements of job but generally none.

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

My own alumni school. I checked their curriculum recently and it hasn’t changed much since I graduated 10+ years ago.

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Try to become as well-rounded as possible to be more marketable to potential employers

Do you have any other comments, for library schools or students, or about the survey?

Think very hard before entering the library professional. Don’t believe the myth about the large number of librarians retiring and the impending librarian shortage. There is high supply (job seekers), low demand (jobs) and in many areas the pay is abysmal. Be willing to explore alternative job opportunities, your perfect “library job” may not be in a library.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses to this survey, or specific analysis of the responses discussing online school, the amount of coursework students should take, and preferences/reluctances for candidates from certain schools.

Do you hire librarians?  Tell us your answer to, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Southern US, Urban area, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School