For Public Review: JMA

Welcome to crowd-sourced resume review for LIS job hunters!

Please help the job hunter below by using the comment button to offer constructive criticism on her resume. Some guidelines for constructive feedback are here, and the ALA NMRT has brief tips for reviewing resumes here.

This 10 page resume with cover letter was submitted by a job hunter who says,

I am interested in positions such as Campus Librarians, Director

JMA- FOR REVIEW-0 JMA- FOR REVIEW-1 JMA- FOR REVIEW-2 JMA- FOR REVIEW-3 JMA- FOR REVIEW-4 JMA- FOR REVIEW-5 JMA- FOR REVIEW-6 JMA- FOR REVIEW-7 JMA- FOR REVIEW-8 JMA- FOR REVIEW-9

To submit your resume or CV For Public Review,

  • send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.
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3 Comments

Filed under CV review, For Public Review, Resume Review

3 responses to “For Public Review: JMA

  1. AK

    This is a strong academic c.v., but there are a few areas that are non-standard or unclear, at least for a U.S. audience.

    The “technical skills” listed before the education are not really technical skills (the “technical proficiencies” — check spelling — at the end are more traditionally technical.) I would leave that first skills section out entirely; in any case, education should always come first.

    It is unclear whether the “continuing education” section lists classes the applicant has taught or just classes she has taken.

    Review for parallel structure: all items or bullet points in a list should use the same parts of speech and should either have or not have periods at the end. Also, active verbs — created, contributed, taught, developed, etc. — are always preferable to passive constructions such as “responsible for.”

    Good luck!

  2. It’s worth fleshing out the bullets under “Professional Experience;” Some jobs seem to have a lot of information and others none at all. You could also leave out the “specialized duties included.” We presume that everything on your CV is a specialized duty.

    The memberships you list are also not as helpful, especially if you can’t show real involvement in the organizations. I would reconsider where this section is placed.

    Technical Proficiencies seem to be redundant in light of your technical skills section. Try combining them and narrowing down which topics you really want to highlight (as the commenter above notes).

  3. This is quite an extensive resume; is this common for the sort of position you are applying for? It is out of the realm of my experience, so I am sincerely curious.

    The one thing I thought could use some more work is expanding the Online Instruction and Support Services section. Could you perhaps provide some specific examples here?

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