Monthly Archives: September 2015

We’re seeing a lot of functional resumes and they are difficult to use

Fruit Venders, Indianapolis Market, aug., 1908. Wit., E N Clopper. Location Indianapolis, Indiana.This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Subject specialists, instruction, reference, catalogers, archivists, etc.

This librarian works at a library with 50-100 staff members in an suburban area in the Northeastern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Met the basic education requirements for the position; had actual library experience

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

The search committee reviews the applications, use rubrics matched to the job description, and makes the decisions on whom to call for interviews. HR is not involved except for the paperwork.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Lack of education requirements (lack of MLS or secondary masters degree); lack of experience working in an academic library — we’re flexible on this and will consider internships, praticums, work-study, paraprofessional work as library experience.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Write a clear and concise CV. We’re seeing a lot of functional resumes and they are difficult to use in evaluating the candidate because we have to research for information about the candidate. We use the CV to look for education attainments, progression in work, can they be tenured, do they have the work experience. If we can’t located the info quickly, we tend not to take the candidate seriously. Also, we’ve received a dismaying amount of resumes/CV that tell us nothing about the candidate — the resumes read like a school transcript or other irrelevant information.

I want to hire someone who is

excellent

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 50-100

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

We want to see that the person worked in a library — either as student or paraprofessional or professional or had practicums, work-study, internships, etc. in library school. We worry when we see a candidate from a good library school but we have no idea if they actually worked in library besides study in one.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

We’re looking for different types of librarians now — people who can do outreach, liaison work, engage with professor and our teaching faculty, etc. The positions we have not replaced with a professional librarian had job duties not conversant with professional librarian duties.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

1 Comment

Filed under 50-100 staff members, Academic, Northeastern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Suburban area

For Public Review: Unnamed job hunter 20

Welcome to crowd-sourced resume review for LIS job hunters!

Please help the job hunter below by using the comment button to offer constructive criticism on her resume. Some guidelines for constructive feedback are here, and the ALA NMRT has brief tips for reviewing resumes here.

This 2  page resume was submitted by a job hunter who says,

This is a resume and I’ve been applying for public librarian positions. This was not my original intent for my degree, but those are the positions that are open and I’m hoping to do a great job!

resume-for-review-0

 resume-for-review-1

To submit your resume or CV For Public Review,

  • send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

8 Comments

Filed under CV review, For Public Review, Resume Review

express interest in a long-term role

Market day, Killarney 2 This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Academic/General Reference/Subject

This librarian works at a library with 200+ staff members in an urban area in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 26-50 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

Held requisite credentials and possessed the skills, experience, and cultural fit necessary to thrive in the role

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

Recruiting reviews apps and resumes
Associate Dean of Library interviews with a panel of Deans
Dean (me) completes the final interview

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Educational experience disqualifies (no MLIS)

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: When requested

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Clean resume; read the job description and tailor interview responses and cover letter to the job; express interest in a long-term role

I want to hire someone who is

Passionate

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 200+

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: 0

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Yes, Office Requirement

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

Field is changing, but not dying. Folks need to think outside of traditional roles and be open to unique opportunities to maintain hire-ability.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 200+ staff members, Academic, Midwestern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area

The word librarian isn’t in the job title

Jennifer BRidgensJennifer Bridgens is a search architect for the eBusiness department of Ferguson Enterprises Inc. Ferguson is headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, and is classified in the wholesale supply industry – perhaps best known for plumbing products but also catering to a variety of businesses in multiple industries. Here is how she describes her background and current work:

I have a master’s of science in information and library science from the graduate school of library and information science at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Illinois, and I received my Bachelor’s degree in English at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, Kansas. I like to think that, while I learned a great deal about library systems and information theory from GSLIS, I really learned my analytic skills from my undergraduate degree. Nothing teaches you to analyze so well as parsing out the phenomenological meanings of Virginia Woolf’s works or the hidden biographical traces in Ernest Hemingway’s books.

I’ve had the opportunity to work on various projects, both here at Ferguson and previously at Yellowbook.com. I am proud of my achievements in both places, and none of them could have been done without the amazing development teams with whom I worked. Perhaps the hardest but most rewarding one in the past occurred while at Yellowbook. I and several others spent hours analyzing data comparison reports, making sure that businesses would show correctly in accurate search ranges. All the prep work that went into that first release was hard; I would close my eyes and see Excel spreadsheets floating in the air. But the search experience was so much better that it was worth the blood, sweat, and tears.

Currently, I’m buried in Ferguson product data, looking for methods to optimize the content for the search platform we use. It is again, like Yellowbook project, one that requires hard work and meticulous scrutiny, but having been down this road before, I know the reward will worth the work. My hobbies of coloring and crocheting keep me sane while I’m in the middle of these types of projects. My desk is quite messy, to be honest, with books, Stickie notes, and my Supernatural Pop Vinyl figurines. And Legos. I sit with the UX Design team—none of us would survive without Legos.

Ms. Bridgens is team lead and has been a member of a hiring or search committee. She person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Catalogers
Taxonomists
Reference Librarians
Collection Specialists

Ferguson Enterprises has more than 200 staff members and is in an urban area of the MidAtlantic US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ more than 75 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

they have organizational and analytical skills and come from a variety of undergrad degrees and backgrounds

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

HR weeds them out, so I tend to hunt them down myself and pull librarians into corporate jobs

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

disinterest in working in a corporate setting–if they won’t be happy outside of a library, there’s no point in trying

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: if they ask

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

tailor their application to the job, this is so unbelievably important; also do some research about the company you apply to–even knowing the basics like how long the company has been in business is good

I want to hire someone who is

Curious

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 200+

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: the word librarian isn’t in the job title

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are more positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

We look for talent (self-taught) for entry level and do temp to permanent (1st 90 days is temp). For positions needing more experience we will look for the MS in LIS as preferred. Data curation wasn’t always taken seriously, but it is now.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

“Information that cannot be found may as well not exist.” Nancy Mulvaney wrote that, and I learned it in “library school.” Search logic is only as good as the metadata that describes the thing. Without curation of the data, there is chaos, and finding the thing becomes more about treasure hunts with poorly marked maps than coordinates and GPS telling you in fractions of a second where the thing is.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

If you are looking for a librarianish job that isn’t in a library, the corporate world needs librarians. Some of the companies don’t really understand the value librarians have, but most librarians have this unique trait of staring a large problem in the face (like a large truck of books that needs to be cataloged) and working out in their head from start to finish how it will get done. This is a critical analysis tool. If you know how to research, you can analyze. If you know how to catalog, you know how to handle product data. If you can learn MARC…seriously, you can handle any backend system anywhere.

Do you hire librarians? Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

2 Comments

Filed under 200+ staff members, Special, State of the Job Market 2015

our institution does not have a particularly strong culture of mentorship, and therefore an experienced candidate is more likely to be successful.

City, Public Library, 1956This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Subject Librarians (Research & Instruction)

This librarian works at a library with 50-100 staff members in an urban area in the  Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Met required qualifications for education & experience, showed interest in our specific job & institution (as demonstrated by content of cover letter).

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

All applications are evaluated by a library search committee (not screened by HR). We do use a standardized rubric regarding required and desirable experience & skills.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Lack of compelling relevant experience (when hiring subject librarians in an academic setting, demonstrable subject-area expertise is essential.)

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Write an excellent cover letter that clearly describes relevant expertise and interest in our specific job & institution. We receive many letters that are quite generic; although we do understand that the job hunt can be repetitive & arduous, it’s hard to get excited about candidates who don’t seem excited about us.

I want to hire someone who is

a team player.

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 50-100

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

We advertise positions as “2+ years of professional experience in an academic setting preferred.” We are aware that our institution does not have a particularly strong culture of mentorship, and therefore an experienced candidate is more likely to be successful.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

I think it’s an evolving profession more than a dying one. I do think that successful candidates must distinguish themselves with special skills or experience, and once hired, must be prepared to do outreach & demonstrate their value. The English majors who just really “love books & helping people” are a dime a dozen, but there are more opportunities for those with specialized subject-area expertise and/or technical (coding, UX, etc) skills.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

Proofread all your materials, and then proofread them again. During the initial review of (usually dozens or more) applications, we are looking for a reason to say no to you, so don’t make it easy with a poorly written, generic cover letter.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 50-100 staff members, Academic, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area

serious applicants, trust worthy, independent, would represent the library well

City, Public Library, 1956 This anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Director
Cataloger

This librarian works at a library with 0-10 staff members in a rural area in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

serious applicants, trust worthy, independent, would represent the library well

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

Director reads through resumes and applications, no HR

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Prior job experience and length of holding positions and education, also the grammar and how well the application or the resume is done

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

make the hiring process easy to understand and accessible for everyone, job description is clear and concise.

I want to hire someone who is

reliable

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 0-10

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: 0

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: 0

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

no, just what is required at the state level

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

Information is still needed to be acquired, libraries and librarians change how patrons get this information

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 0-10 staff members, Midwestern US, Public, Rural area, State of the Job Market 2015

Most of our professional positions are not considered entry-level, so we generally look for at least two years of experience.

Push cart market -- New York (LOC)This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

I am the hiring manager for outreach and for the librarian-in-residency. I am involved in overseeing hiring processes for all librarians.

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Western US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

In addition to meeting all required qualifications, the applicant clearly articulated how his or her qualifications and interests were a good fit for the position and our library.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

HR does not review applications. A library search committee reviews applications against a rating scale (not yet a fully articulated rubric) for each of the required and preferred qualifications.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Applicant does not adequately articulate his or her qualifications in relation to the posted position.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

To carefully read the position description/announcement and review the library’s and its institution’s website and then clearly articulate in resume and cover letter how he or she is uniquely qualified to fill this specific position.

I want to hire someone who is

articulate

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are more positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Most of our professional positions are not considered entry-level, so we generally look for at least two years of experience. We do have a two-year residency position for which we actually look for individuals with minimal experience.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

I feel that faculty at our university (and others) are better appreciating the active role that librarians can and should play in the educational mission of the institution.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area, Western US

Experience can include in grad school, para-professional, etc.

Queipo Market in Little Havana - MiamiThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Instruction and reference librarians

This librarian works at a library with 100-200 staff members in an urban area in the Western US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ more than 100, but less than 200

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Met the required minimal qualifications and submitted the appropriate documentation

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

A committee with a checklist (for documents and qualifications) and then a rubric for cover letter and preferred quals

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Does not yet have the degree required OR Does not yet have the years of experience required (it’s a tie between these two reasons)

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: If asked after making it to an inteview

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Read the job description and requirements and use that to develop your materials.

I want to hire someone who is

engaged

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 100-200

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

For most entry level positions no, but it is preferred and experience can include in grad school, para-professional, etc.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 100-200 staff members, Academic, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area, Western US

do your research on the organization and area

Vegetable and flower seller and stall, Pike Place Market, Seattle, WashingtonThis anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager, a member of a hiring or search committee, and a human resources professional. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Youth Services
Reference
Inter-library loan
Library Clerks
Processing
Custodial

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a suburban area in the Northeastern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

qualified, personable, excellent customer service, public library experience

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

applications are evaluated by the Director with input from key staff members

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

grammatical/spelling errors in the resume and/or cover letter
not following directions as stated in the job description
submitting a general cover letter
lack of qualifications

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: sometimes

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

follow directions
do your research on the organization and area

I want to hire someone who is

dependable

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 1

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 1

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ I don’t know

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Northeastern US, Public, State of the Job Market 2015, Suburban area

I would not recommend anyone start library school, unless they REALLY want to.

View of street vendors at 7th and B Streets, NW (Ca. 1880) MarketThis anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Reference, children’s, catalogers, acquisitions staff, teen librarian (singular for entire system)

This librarian works at a library with 100-200 staff members in an urban area in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 26-50 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

self-motivated, approachable, detail oriented, knowledgeable

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

HR then upper management

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

lack of qualifications, poor cover letter, over-confidence, gut feeling

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Cover letters suck to write, but they really do provide a platform to separate you from other candidates. Make it honest, but humble.

I want to hire someone who is

self-motivated

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 100-200

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Not required, but experience definitely gives you a leg up.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ Yes

Why or why not?

Not necessarily dying, but definitely shrinking. I would not recommend anyone start library school, unless they REALLY want to.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

My experience has shown that cover letters really do make the difference in selecting candidates to interview.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 100-200 staff members, Midwestern US, Public, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area