Category Archives: 0-10 staff members

It’s students. If they have work study and can read, they’re eligible for hiring

Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. A barrack building has been turned into a library… National Archives

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Academic Library 

Title: Circulation Supervisor 

Titles hired include: Circulation & Reference Desk Student Worker

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ The position’s supervisor 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Other: Apply in person

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

If we have an opening, I choose students who are available to work the hours I need filled

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

I had a student who was the only one in her class who showed up for in library study. I liked her honesty and approached her and asked if she wanted a job 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

Attitude and being underdressed 

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

If they can count money and knows how to think independently 

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One!  

Resume:  √ Only One!  

CV: √ We don’t ask for this 

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Talking too much

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

No

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

N/A

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

It’s students. If they have work study and can read, they’re eligible for hiring 

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

What can get them fired 

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Southeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Suburban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10  

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Academic, Southeastern US, Suburban area

We love non-library candidates!

Photograph of Martin Burrell. By Flickr user Archives of the Law Society of Ontario

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Head of Circulation / Bookkeeper 

Titles hired include: Library Associates and Library Assistants (ft and pt clerks) 

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ Library Administration

√ The position’s supervisor 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Cover letter

√ Resume 

√ Other: We have a short interview and usually ask final candidate for references if they haven’t been offered. 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ Other: Applications through indeed have questions, but candidates can also email cover letter and resume directly and not do those. 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

We usually post a few places online, indeed and job boards – I go through the candidates and get down to 15-30 possibilities to interview. My boss (library director) and I decide on which of those to interview together. We do interviews with the two of us and make final decision together. 

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

We put an emphasis on customer service – candidates who recognize this as a large portion of the job and give thoughtful, complete answers to these questions are the most impressive. 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

People who state that they want to work at a library because they “love to read” or “want a quiet job.” 

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

I think self motivation is the biggest issue for us – it’s hard to tell how motivated candidates are unless they’re actually hired. 

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One! 

Resume: √ Two is ok, but no more  

CV: √ Two is ok, but no more  

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Responding as though they didn’t read the job description. 

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

We have, as necessary with COVID and candidates living out of state. Part of the job is tech support for patrons, so candidates who can’t figure out their own tech is a red flag. 

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

We love non-library candidates! We might be more open than most but most of our questions are geared toward similar experiences, not exact situations from the past. 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

We do have questions on the Indeed posts, which can limit some, even if they can be avoided. We try to look for a variety of people and experiences when interviewing, but there are certain conditions like “lifting weight” which while not strictly necessary for every person, are necessary to have some staff members able to do. 

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

I like when candidates ask about good and bad parts of our jobs, or the working environment. We do our best to be honest. 

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Midwestern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Suburban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Midwestern US, Public, Suburban area

Not showing up

Reception at the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Law Librarians. Washington, DC. NYPL Digital Collections

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Director

Titles hired include: Library Assistant, children’s librarian

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ The position’s supervisor 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Cover letter

√ Resume

√ References

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Municipality posts jobs, collects resumes, forwards them to me. I interview with another staff person, make hiring recommendation

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

Pleasant, answered every question thoughtfully, seemed like good personality fit

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

Abrasive people, drama queens, evasive or inattentive answers

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

Personality fits

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One! 

Resume: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant  

CV: √ We don’t ask for this  

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Not showing up

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

Sometimes. We all have tech glitches, roll with them.

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

Customer service, willingness to learn, don’t assume all last work transfers, please have some tech skills

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

Anything

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Northeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Suburban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Northeastern US, Public, Suburban area

How do you plan to live on this wage?

A black and white portrait of a man with a lush beard and mustache, wearing a suit.
William George Eakins, Chief Librarian of the Law Society of Upper Canada, 1891-1913. By Flickr user Archives of the Law Society of Ontario

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Head of Adult and Technology Services

Titles hired include: Children’s Librarian, Head of Circulation, Administrative Assistant/Library Associate, assistant circ 

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ Library Administration

√ A Committee or panel

√ Employees at the position’s same level (on a panel or otherwise) 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application

√ Cover letter

√ Resume

√ References 

√ Supplemental Questions 

√ Demonstration (teaching, storytime, etc) 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Hiring committee assembled. Job role reviewed and put out to bid. Application submission, invite for an in-person interview, often includes demonstration or hands on skill portion, job offer. We also pick an alternate as well. We will re-advertise until we find the right candidate. 

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

They responded to the job role meaning they researched it. They knew about the organization’s history and community. They were personable, professional and had a wide breadth of experience. 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

When application process and requirements aren’t submitted. We may still invite them for an interview, but it counts against them if we have to ask more than once for—say— a cover letter. 

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

How will you find housing here? Do you have stable year-round housing? How do you plan to live on this wage? 

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Two is ok, but no more  

Resume: √ Two is ok, but no more  

CV: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant  

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

No

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

Showcase your ability to multitask and learn 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

We have a diverse hiring committee and consider it a metric. Our community is diverse, we ask direct service related questions regarding diversity and acceptance.

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Northeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Rural 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Northeastern US, Public, Rural area

For us, it’s not showing ambition

Paul Brockett, Librarian, Smithsonian Nat’l Academy of Science, 7/19. Loc.gov

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Archives 

Title: Archives assistant 

Titles hired include: Graduate research assistants and interns, but we did just hire a third full time person

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ The position’s supervisor

√ Other: Director

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application

√ Cover letter

√ Resume

√ References 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

They apply and we go through the resumes, once we go through the resumes the director will call them in for an interview and we interview them

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

They had a lot of good experience and a great personality 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

The biggest thing for us is qualifications and personality. They have to be able to work with the public as well as being able to work on collections

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One! 

Resume: √ Two is ok, but no more 

CV: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant 

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

For us, it’s not showing ambition  

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

We have not 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad  

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Southeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Suburban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Archives, Southeastern US, Suburban area

How many hours a day they spend on social media or on the telephone with friends instead of doing the work.

Annual Archivist Awards. Sam Anthony (left). National Archives.

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Academic Library

√ Archives 

Title: Archivist

Titles hired include: Archives technician, Librarians

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ HR

√ Library Administration

√ A Committee or panel 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application

√ Cover letter

√ Resume

√ CV

√ References

√ Proof of degree

√ Oral Exam/Structured interview

√ Demonstration (teaching, storytime, etc)

√ More than one round of interviews

√ A whole day of interviews

√ A meal with hiring personnel

√ Other: Zoom Interview

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

For archives positions I write the job description. I am lead on interviewing. I can choose the best candidate but must make a good case.

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

They were articulate

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

Not having the skills asked for in the job description. Talking about how the job would benefit them, not what skills they would bring to help the institution.

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

How many hours a day they spend on social media or on the telephone with friends instead of doing the work.

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Two is ok, but no more

Resume: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant

CV: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

It varies

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

Being comfortable on camera is hard.

Be sure to pick your background appropriately. Sound matters.

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

From para to professional is hard. Moving institutions is probably the only way to do it. Former co-workers may never accept the change.

All experience is relevant. But there are so many candidates so employers can be picky.

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ We only discuss after we’ve made an offer

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

Very little is done to reduce bias. I would suggest training.

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

I think trying to understand the personalities of the people the candidate would work with, and making sure they would like to work with those people. Anything can be done for a year, but long term is hard.

Look at the culture of the organization.

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Southeastern US

What’s your region like?

√ Other: Small town in rural area but less than 45 minutes to a city

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Academic, Archives, Rural area, Southeastern US

They asked excellent questions.

Fairleigh Dickinson College Library, Rutherford, New Jersey. Librarian room. LOC.gov

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Special Library

Title: Director – Library

Titles hired include: Associate Director, Digital Library;  Senior Specialist, Systems Librarian

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ The position’s supervisor

√ A Committee or panel 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application 

√ Resume 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ Yes 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

HR filters the applications and send them on to the hiring manager

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

Excellent interviewing skills; they were well prepared and had taken time to learn about the company. They asked excellent questions.

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

No knowledge of the company they’re interviewing with.

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

Gaps in resume

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ We don’t ask for this  

Resume: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant 

CV: √ We don’t ask for this 

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

No eye contact

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

Yes, we did during COVID. Just need to be fully engaged in the conversation. I don’t see much difference really between in person and virtual.

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

The job market is still tight so I’ll take a chance on people who do have a lot of experience in one particular aspect. 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ We only discuss after we’ve made an offer 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

We try to have a diverse interviewing panel. We also have mandatory training on working on removing biases.  

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Northeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Suburban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Some of the time and/or in some positions 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Northeastern US, Special, Suburban area

If a candidate is unfamiliar with the type of work done in a library, ask!

Captain (CPT) Robert Campbell and Brigadier General (BGEN) Gene Deegan, director, Education Center, assist the head librarian during the ribbon cutting ceremony celebrating the opening of the rare book reading room at Breckinridge Library, Command and Staff College. National Archives

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Academic Library 

Title: Collections Manager

Titles hired include: Gallery Monitor, Student worker

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ Library Administration

√ The position’s supervisor 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application

√ Resume 

√ Oral Exam/Structured interview 

√ A whole day of interviews 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

We submit a requisition to HR, noting that this position is specifically for student workers. They post it on our website, and all applications come directly to the position supervisor, who arranges interviews and hires candidates.

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

They were outgoing, and didn’t hesitate to look me in the eyes. They were clearly nervous, but not enough to throw them off. They readily answered questions and displayed interpersonal skills, making small jokes and smiling a lot.

What are your instant dealbreakers?

Not displaying skills- whether it’s on your resume or in the interview, if you can’t tell me why you’d be a good addition, it’s not going to work out.

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

Their work ethic.

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One!  

Resume: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant  

CV: √ Two is ok, but no more 

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Being too nervous to look me in the eye. Answering a question too quickly without thinking a little more.

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

Pick the right background! Don’t be in bed, and present yourself as if you were at an in-person interview. Check everything on your computer beforehand- sound, video, background, lighting.

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

If a candidate is unfamiliar with the type of work done in a library, ask! For example, if the candidate previously did typical office work, I would want to know that they’re familiar with multi-line phones and learning a particular organizational system. So if the candidate asks what a typical day is like at my library, I would throw out a few basic tasks. Then they could demonstrate their skills in those areas.

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the information provided at the interview 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

Unfortunately, we are incredibly behind in that process.

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

I want a candidate to ask deep details about the job- upcoming projects, how they can succeed in this role. I want us to talk about their personality and goals, and make sure a potential hire is a good fit. A candidate should ask not just about the job itself, but the culture, the hours, the pay.

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Southeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Urban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Academic, Southeastern US, Urban area

We are a small, rural library. We take what we can get!

Photograph of Mr. Arthur Kimberly, Chief of the Preservation Service at the National Archives, Explaining Preservation Work to be Done on Some of New York State’s Most Treasured Documents Soon to be Exhibited on New York’s Freedom Train. National Archives

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Library Director

Titles hired include: Circ specialist, programming specialist, circ aide, assistant director

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ Library Administration 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Cover letter

√ Resume

√ References 

√ Supplemental Questions 

√ Oral Exam/Structured interview 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

I do all hiring. 7 staff members. Only hire when necessary. Put in paper and online. 

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

Buy in and customer service experience. 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

Nothing really, just the obvious like racism, sexism, etc. 

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

None. I ask everything I want to know 🙂

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One! 

Resume: √ Two is ok, but no more 

CV: √ We don’t ask for this  

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

“I love books!”. Libraries are so much more than just books!

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

No

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

Not happened to me yet.

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

We are a small, rural library. We take what we can get! 

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

Anything they need to know. I want employees to feel comfortable and supported. 

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Midwestern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Rural 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

Author’s note: Hey, thanks for reading! If you like reading, why not try commenting or sharing? Or are you somebody who hires Library, Archives or other LIS workers? Please consider giving your own opinion by filling out the survey here.

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, Midwestern US, Public, Rural area

We don’t expect people to be able to isolate themselves at home for a Zoom call depending on their personal situation so we are prepared to be flexible

Archivist Sara Jackson. National Archives

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Archives

√ Public Library 

Title: library trustee and retired special librarian

Titles hired include: YA, PT and FT Children’s, Tech Services, Adult Services, Admin

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ HR

√ Library Administration

√ Employees at the position’s same level (on a panel or otherwise) 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Cover letter

√ Resume

√ References

√ Oral Exam/Structured interview

√ More than one round of interviews 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Job description (usually Union affiliated) must be approved by City as well as Union, job is advertised locally and on regional boards, resumes are reviewed by Lib Director and Head of HR to decide on interviews; interviews take place with Director, and relevant team members, sometimes reviewed by Trustees depending on level

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

Articulate, asked good questions, expressed genuine interest in position and also in growth in the organization, good skill set beyond just MLS skills

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

Either on Zoom or in person, shows up in unprofessional dress, difficult expressing themselves when asked questions (not including nervousness), stumped to describe strengths and weaknesses or an important accomplishment or learning experience at previous job

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

Are they actually a good teammate; are they a responsible/reliable individual

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One!  

Resume: √ Two is ok, but no more  

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Showing up without having done basic homework about the organization

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

Yes, same reasons as in question 8 (Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?) and question 9 (What are your instant dealbreakers?). We don’t expect people to be able to isolate themselves at home for a Zoom call depending on their personal situation so we are prepared to be flexible.  

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

There are lots of relevant skills learned in non-library related jobs so it is important for a candidate to describe these and do their best to relate them to the job on offer.  Often parapro or pre-pro experience is like an entry level professional so I don’t look down on people who don’t have the degree.  An expressed desire to get a credential is important though it depends on the job.

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the information provided at the interview 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

As a govt. organization and personally we are committed to a diverse workforce that mirrors the demographics of our city and we value the differing points of view that employees can bring to the table.  Given the lack of diversity in many MLS programs and libraries of all types, there is still a lot of discrimination in hiring, conscious or otherwise.

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

Questions about expectations not explicit in job description; also probing about how team dynamics work, any political or other issues that are involved that could impact the library, opportunities for growth if contribution is proven so how regular are performance reviews and who does them. Perhaps even typical frustrations experienced on the job.

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Northeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Urban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Archives, Northeastern US, Public, Urban area