Category Archives: City/town

The less you need the job, the more likely you are to be hired.

Housewives league at Wash. MarketThis anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee, a human resources professional, library director, mentor, and someone who has recently been hired and hired others. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

All types, including reference/information professionals

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an area that is a mix of rural and factory town in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Qualified to do the job as described with nothing more than specific location training.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

The applications were evaluated by the Library Director, the assistant director, a staff person in the department, and an outside party who would be working regularly in the department.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Lack of qualifications. The “I like books and kids, I can do that job” mentality.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: If asked.

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Be qualified for the job you are applying for–read the description, learn about the area and the library to which you are seeking employment. Be as picky as you can. If you apply to a place where you don’t want to go–it shows. If you have personal baggage from a previous position still are tough about it–it shows.

I can’t fix that in an applicant.

I hate to write this, but the less you need the job, the more likely you are to be hired.

This means: operate from a position of strength, try and be at least OK with you current situation, be confident in your answers, even if you think that is not what the interviewer wants to hear.

I want to hire someone who is

Friendly

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Other: 5-6

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Other: 1-2

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

No. And getting education on the job can be an issue.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

Because the profession is dynamic, and is more about the contents of the materials that the materials themselves. As the profession changes–learns the vocabulary of the age it was waiting for–we will be the curators and the information keepers and navigators for future generations who don’t understand how the best tools for their tasks are created, let alone where they are located.

That is what we do.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, City/town, Midwestern US, Public, Rural area, State of the Job Market 2015

They have to provide documentation if they choose not to interview someone who is minimally qualified.

OUTDOOR MARKET AT HAYMARKET SQUARE. PUBLIC PROTEST KEPT THE SQUARE FROM BECOMING PART OF AN EXPRESSWAY, 051973This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

All required for large research institution’s library.

This librarian works at a library with 100-200 staff members in a cluster of small cities in the Northeastern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ Other: really varies by the position, but I have heard of between 10-100 applications

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 26-50 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

Generally speaking, they have an MLS or MIS and meet most of the requirements of the job description.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

Search committee members are given access to applications through an HR software system. The first step of the search committee is to identify candidates who are minimally qualified for first round (phone) interviews. A spreadsheet is developed by HR where search committee members can check off minimum qualifications for each candidate – then all search committee members compare notes. Search committees are 3-6 people and are representative of different staff levels and include representatives from departments that the candidate would work with.

They have to provide documentation if they choose not to interview someone who is minimally qualified. They do phone interviews and recommend candidates for on-campus interviews. All candidates are asked the same questions for phone and in-person interviews, and they all meet with all the same people. Questions are developed by the search committee and approved by HR.

The only way applications are kept from the search committee is if they come in after the application deadline – then, if the search committee doesn’t identify enough qualified applicants from the first round, they can see the additional applications.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Doesn’t meet the most important qualifications (they are listed in declining importance).

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Having experience or knowing about the issues related to the job he/she is applying for.

I want to hire someone who is

willing

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 100-200

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

No full-time professional experience required, but generally the best entry level candidates straight from graduate school have either specialized in school or have worked in an applicable department in library school. We have 5 ranks of librarians and generally they are ranked appropriately by how much experience the position would require.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

Some positions are no longer relevant, but it continues to evolve.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 100-200 staff members, Academic, City/town, Northeastern US, State of the Job Market 2015

We typically hire new grads, so I don’t expect an applicant to have a lot of actual teaching experience

Interior of Townsville library, ca. 1948This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee a human resources professional. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Reference/Instruction
Access Services
Technical Services
Systems

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a city/town in the Southern US.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Yes

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

3

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Cataloging
√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Research Methods
√ Reference
√ Information Behavior
√ Instruction
√ Soft Skills (e.g. Communication, Interpersonal Relations)

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

If you’re going into an academic library, please, please, PLEASE have a basic idea of how to put together an instructional session and direct a class. We typically hire new grads, so I don’t expect an applicant to have a lot of actual teaching experience, but it sure is nice to see that she has at least some understanding of theories and practices related to information literacy instruction, instructional design, etc. If I’m interviewing you tomorrow, and you don’t have a clue what the new IL Framework is or how it differs from the old set of IL Standards, that’s a red flag.

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

The first thing that comes to mind: I don’t expect new reference/instruction librarians to know every database inside and out on Day One. I don’t even expect them to have “favorite databases” (a frequent interview question during my first job search) so much as I expect them to understand how databases work: how to execute basic and advanced searches and how to use filters/refiners/facets in an efficient and effective manner.

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Internship or practicum

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Simmons College come to mind immediately. And it seems like a lot of the smart and insightful young librarians I’ve come across online and at conferences recently came out of Indiana University.

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

Nope

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Skip the reader advisory class if you’re interested in academia. Take that cataloging class, if for no other reason than to understand how it all works. Learn a little bit about teaching. HAVE FUN.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses to this survey, or specific analysis of the responses discussing online school, the amount of coursework students should take, and preferences/reluctances for candidates from certain schools.

Do you hire librarians?  Tell us your answer to, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, City/town, Southern US, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

Please, for the love of Pete, do NOT call a position entry level if it requires X amount of experience.

Library International Law Reading Room, 1964This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is not currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Public libraries, and Special libraries, at the following levels: Entry level. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

Interned in an academic library’s archival department. Conducted a fieldwork project in same.

This job hunter is in a city/town in the Western US, other: and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Compatibility, challenge, a chance to learn the ins and outs.

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist, INALJ, HigherEd Jobs, LinkedIn, Indeed, various listservs.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other: Not sure it’s a red flag if salary ranges aren’t posted, but I sure wish I knew what the motivation is behind NOT posting!

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I probably spend at least a couple of hours per application. Crafting the cover letters take a lot of time. I try to highlight my accomplishments as they pertain to the job description.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

I generally think most employers include enough information in job descriptions to attract good candidates.

I have already filled out the survey recently, but I came back to it because I thought of another answer for this question.

The second-most frustrating thing about job searching, besides the application abyss I mentioned perviously, is filling out redundant online application forms. Everything relevant – my education, experience, contact information – is in my resume and cover letter. Is having to retype it all into some poorly-suited web form actually some kind of test as to whether I REALLY want the job? The hiring process would be less painful if these application forms didn’t exist.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Please, for the love of Pete, do NOT call a position entry level if it requires X amount of experience. If you are truly hiring for an actual entry level position, then weed out the applicants with a lot of experience. Level the playing field! Highly qualified candidates are in a much better position to find jobs matching their skills and experience.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I wish I knew!

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

Maybe ask a question about acceptable salary ranges depending on skills and qualifications. Also, what kinds of questions are we being asked when we do get the chance to interview? What kinds of professional associations do we belong to, and does belonging to a professional organization make a difference in the job hunt? An open ended question about whether or not we feel we’ve exhausted all options as far as professional library positions are concerned, and what kind of work are we considering if not library work.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, MLIS Students, Public, Special, Western US

I find finishing a masters program while juggling a job, family and other commitments very impressive,

Geraldine Fain Browses in the Free LibraryThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee a human resources professional. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

research support librarians, teaching librarians, library assistants

This librarian works at a library with 0-10 staff members in a city/town suburban area rural area in the UK.

Do library schools teach candidates the job skills you are looking for in potential hires?

√ Depends on the school/Depends on the candidate

Should library students focus on learning theory or gaining practical skills? (Where 1 means Theory, 5 means practice, and 3 means both equally)

2

What coursework do you think all (or most) MLS/MLIS holders should take, regardless of focus?

√ Budgeting/Accounting
√ Project Management
√ Library Management
√ Collection Management
√ Programming (Events)
√ Web Design/Usability
√ Metadata
√ Research Methods
√ Information Behavior
√ Marketing
√ Instruction
√ Soft Skills (e.g. Communication, Interpersonal Relations)

Do you find that there are skills that are commonly lacking in MLS/MLIS holders? If so, which ones?

instruction skills. Nearly all librarians need these skills, whether it’s one to ones, group classes, lectures or staff development

When deciding who to hire out of a pool of candidates, do you value skills gained through coursework and skills gained through practice differently?

√ No preference–as long as they have the skill, I don’t care how they got it

Which skills (or types of skills) do you expect a new hire to learn on the job (as opposed to at library school)?

Local policies and procedures

Which of the following experiences should library students have upon graduating?

√ Library work experience
√ Conference presentation
√ Professional organization involvement

Which library schools give candidates an edge (you prefer candidates from these schools)?

Distance learning – I’ve seen that others disagree with this, but I find finishing a masters program while juggling a job, family and other commitments very impressive, especially if the candidate has worked in libraries while completing their qualification. They often have a better understanding of course content because they are actually applying it and reflecting on it while studying in a way that’s not possible when you do a full-time masters

Are there any library schools whose alumni you would be reluctant to hire?

no

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

Get experience

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses to this survey, or specific analysis of the responses discussing online school, the amount of coursework students should take, and preferences/reluctances for candidates from certain schools.

Do you hire librarians?  Tell us your answer to, “What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School?”: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibschoolsurvey

This survey was coauthored by Brianna Marshall from Hack Library School. Interested in progressive blogging, by, for, and about library students? Check it out!

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, Academic, City/town, UK, What Should Potential Hires Learn in Library School

I’m the bread winner of my household, so I’d rather not waste my time if the position pays even less than I’m making now

Bryd, RichardThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience.  This job hunter is in a city/town, in the Western US,  and is willing to move to the Southeastern US.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Location
Location
Location

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist, INALJ

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I usually double check my most current resume and write a cover letter. Two hours max.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

List the salary, even if it’s just a range. I’m looking to relocate cross-country and I’m the bread winner of my household, so I’d rather not waste my time if the position pays even less than I’m making now.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Update candidates on the status of the job search! Nothing is more frustrating than sending in an application and hearing that the position has been filled 8 months later (or never hearing anything at all).

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Being honest with yourself and with the potential employer. And being patient enough to take the right opportunity, not the first opportunity.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Western US

Stop hiring temp after temp

Library, c.1981This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Public libraries, Special libraries and Government libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience

I did an 8-month paid internship while doing my MLIS and they kept me on for an additional 3 months. To be honest, it wasn’t the best experience, because my supervisor treated me like a personal assistant/gopher and the projects she told me I would be working on were actually assigned to contractors! But it was good to have a job in the field on my résumé and I made some good contacts there so it wasn’t all a waste of time.

 This job hunter is in an city/town in Canada and is not willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

– Potential to learn new skills and move up within the organization
– Stable/long-term jobs (most of the library jobs in my area are contract positions that are 12 months maximum… it gets exhausting jumping from job to job)
– Location/short commute

Where do you look for open positions?

Professional listservs
INALJ
jobs.gc.ca (for the Canadian federal public service)

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

About 3-5 hours. I have a “master” version of my résumé and I tailor it based on the specific requirements in the job posting. That doesn’t take long, but I always struggle with cover letters.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Stop hiring temp after temp when the organization has money for a full-time permanent job! The best candidates aren’t going to apply for short-term contract work unless they have absolutely no other choice.

Improve communication with candidates. If an interviewer tells me “I’ll get back to you by the end of the week” and a month later I haven’t heard back from them, I will be hesitant to apply for a job with that organization in the future. It’s just common courtesy!

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Similar to my last point – communicate better with candidates.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Knowing how to market yourself and demonstrating that you have the skills and competencies for the position.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Canada, City/town, Entry Level, Job hunter's survey, Public, Special

Luck!

This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Library vendors/service providers, Public libraries, and School libraries, at the following levels: Entry level and Supervisory. This job hunter is in Hawaii and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Scope of responsibility, location, pay/benefits

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA, INALJ, Indeed, State government websites

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary
√ Being able to present

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Luck!

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, City/town, Entry Level, Job hunter's survey, Public, School

Please read my resume before the interview

Civic library, Newcastle, 1957, Hood collection This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Public libraries, also nonprofits focused on literacy or education development, at the following levels: Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory,  and Other: anything that seems to match with my skill level . This job hunter is in a city/town in the Northeastern US and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. Significant amount of responsibility commensurate with my experience. The chance to expand my knowledge of the field. An opportunity to help people.

2. Healthy, supportive work environment. Good interactions and collaboration between coworkers, managers, supervisors, etc.

3. Salary commensurate with my experience.

Where do you look for open positions?

INALJ.com
ALA Joblist
USAjobs.gov
Idealist
individual websites of potential employers
various listservs

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

The time spent on the application packet depends on the job and what they request. Typical time spent is an hour to an hour and a half tweaking my resume and cover letter. Time is also used to research the potential employer. More time is spent if it is a position that requires me to fill out a standardized application in addition to submitting resume, cover letter, and other supporting materials.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me
√ Other:  If the job announcement has been cancelled

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

-Be upfront and realistic with job requirements and expectations. It’s discouraging and confusing when I see a long list of advanced job requirements especially for entry level jobs or jobs with low salary. It’s especially confusing when the advanced job requirements don’t seem to match up with the job duties.

-Accurately describe the duties of the position in the job announcement. Along the same lines as my job requirements comment above.

-Provide salary information and work schedule information (part-time, full-time, evening hours, normal 9-5, etc) in the job announcement. Applicants need to know if we can survive off the salary and make it to our shifts. Better to know before wasting our time or the time of employers.

-Look for qualities that a candidate may have acquired/displayed in non-library jobs to fulfill the expectations. I am constantly in awe after talking with many unemployed aspiring librarians after hearing their accomplishments in other fields, volunteer positions, and internships. It’s sad that many employers don’t seem to explore this further but are only concerned with the standard “how many years have you worked as a librarian” question.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

-Communication and respect! Understand that a lot of time and effort is spent searching and applying for jobs. I’ve had many startling stories from my job search process. Numerous times I’ve had a phone or in-person interviews scheduled and had it cancelled because the hiring manager forgot it was a certain day or time. And then I was subsequently taken out of consideration because I was unable to schedule for later that day. Employers should understand that some of us have full-time or part-time jobs, families, other obligations while in the process of searching for a new position and to show at least some respect towards applicants.

-Please read my resume before the interview. There was an instance where a library committee admitted to me that they hadn’t had the chance to read my resume before the interview and did not present any reason for this. Didn’t make me feel good as I had spent hours on my resume, researching the library, the community, and preparing for the interview.

-State in the job announcement if you are willing to do interviews via phone or Skype. Or if you are solely looking to hire from in-person interviews.

-This is probably an institution requirement, but don’t require an applicant to submit the same information multiple times. I have had to complete a long standardized application through the employer website, then email a resume, and then when I came in for the interview I had to submit a handwritten version of the same standardized application that I did the first time.

-Smile! Applicants want to see people who enjoy their jobs just as much as you want to see energetic and eager applicants. Just the amount of people I have witnessed who seem miserable and the number of hiring managers who complain about current or recent employees makes me terrified for this profession. Smile guys, everything’s going to be ok.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

-Luck!
-Persistence (maybe? hopefully.)
-Networking or already working within the organization
-Proximity (Although I hear it recommended by several in the field that you have to be willing to relocate, which I am more than willing, I’ve also been passed up for positions and told by the hiring manager or committee that the deciding factor was that the person they hired was already in the area and wouldn’t need to move. Ouch.).

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

Maybe interview questions that applicants feel they answered well, or interview questions that stumped them.
Interesting ways that applicants stay current or get library-related experience while unemployed or employed in other fields.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Public

Timely follow up

Australian Institute of Librarians' inaugural meeting at Canberra, August 20, 1937. Photographer A. Collingridge, CanberraThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is not currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for More than 18 months. This person is looking in  Archives and Special libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

Five years experience in a technical library. Received MS in Library Science in 2013.

This job hunter is in a city/town in the  Western US and is not willing to move.

Where do you look for open positions?

Library and other job boards, SLA, private company websites, government sites.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Only for certain kinds of employers

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Some packets may only require a basic resume, others require a highly detailed application process. Some require online formatted resume builders. In essence it could take 30 minutes or three hours, depending on the requirements.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Provide detailed descriptions of duties and requirements

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Timely follow up

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Archives, City/town, Job hunter's survey, MLIS Students, Special, Western US