Category Archives: Job Hunters Web Guide

Job Hunter’s Web Guide: Open Cover Letters

My sister is an actor, and a couple years ago she wrote a post about generosity that really resonated with me. She said that if you see a great role that someone else would be perfect for, you should share it.  She said that to get other people to root for you, you have to root for them.  Its better to go through the stress of auditions with people by your side.

I really think the same is true for job hunting.  If we share information, we build a better community.  We’ve got people on our side and a higher quality of work.  That’s why I’m happy to feature Open Cover Letters today. This is a site which allows job hunters to share with each other the secrets of their success.  It provides good examples, which for me personally have created clarity and improved the quality of my work.  Please enjoy this interview!


Open Cover Letters


What is it?  Please give us your elevator speech!

Open Cover Letters aims to help inspire library job hunters write great cover letters. Over 60 hired librarians have graciously submitted cover letters they wrote as part of a successful library job application.

When was it started?  Why was it started?

I created the website in June 2011 after completing a job search. I found that existing cover letter websites were generic and unhelpful. I wished I could have read real examples of librarian cover letters. After accepting my current position, I approached friends and colleagues who were hired, and launched the website with five anonymized cover letters.

Who runs it?

Stephen X. Flynn, Emerging Technologies Librarian at the College of Wooster. Wooster, Ohio.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I am not a career expert at all! Instead, I try to offer advice based on my real world experience both applying for jobs, and also now hiring. I have partnered with ALA JobLIST to present cover letter workshops at the Job Placement Center at ALA. I tell the story of my own job hunt, share what I’ve learned from hiring, and use a worksheet and activities to engage the attendees in reflective practice.

Who is your target audience?

If you are looking for a library job, whether you’re an MLIS student, or an experienced library administrator, you should benefit from reading successful library cover letter examples.

What’s the best way to use your site?  Should users consult it daily?  Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

I think it’s best to browse the website as needed, and use the tags and categories to narrow down to a specific type of library or job description.

Does your site provide:

 Advice on:

 Cover Letters


Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats? 

√ Twitter: @opencoverletter
√ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/opencoverletters

Do you charge for anything on your site?

Open Cover Letters is not only free, but also licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

Yes! When I started the website, I hoped that librarians who were helped would pay it forward by submitting their own cover letter. This has happened countless times as cover letter submitters have told me in the email that they found my website to be helpful. Some readers have also asked me for cover letter and resume advice directly, and one individual in particular told me that after making significant changes to the resume and cover letter, the rate of call-backs went up.

Stephen X FlynnAnything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

There is no magic formula to the perfect cover letter. Like other forms of composition, it’s a form of art that requires time and passion to succeed. Also, an outstanding resumé is just as important as an outstanding cover letter. The two should, in perfect synchronization, communicate your strengths and address the job requirements. You’ve heard the advice that you should tailor your cover letter, but you should also tailor your resumé.

A healthy support network is critical to getting through the job hunting highs and lows. Ask your friends, family and colleagues to critique your job applications. Reach out to hired librarians for advice and support. I know how tough the daily struggle is, and I believe that with the right combination of passion, initiative and support, you’ll be able to find an amazing job!

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Job Hunter’s Web Guide: Infonista

Tired of getting kicked around by libraries? Are you intrigued by the myriad of possibilities for using your degree? Want an alternative LIS career?  Today we are featuring the site for you!  Kim Dority was kind enough to talk to us about her blog, Infonista.


Infonista

What is it? Please give us your elevator speech!

Infonista is a blog that focuses on all the different ways LIS professionals can deploy their information skills, in both traditional and nontraditional environments. In addition, I try to bring in information from outside the profession that may be relevant to building a resilient LIS career.

When was it started? Why was it started?

It was started in June 2010 as a way to extend the reach of a course I’d been teaching in the University of Denver MLIS program – I wanted more students (and LIS practitioners) to understand how incredibly valuable their skill sets could be if they took a broader approach to information work.

Who runs it?

I (Kim Dority) run it, but I have to admit (with embarrassment) that I’ve been somewhat neglectful of my blog recently due to other commitments, e.g., creating and managing the LinkedIn LIS Career Options group and finishing off a recently published book, LIS Career Sourcebook: Managing and Maximizing Every Step of Your Career (Libraries Unlimited, 2013). My goal for this year is to be a much more diligent blogger!

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I don’t necessarily consider myself a “career expert,” but more of someone who’s done nearly every type of LIS work in her career and who has researched and taught courses, webinars, and workshops on this topic for 13 years. During that time I’ve had the extreme good fortune to learn from hundreds of colleagues, students, friends, and even mentors, so I consider myself more of a conduit for and aggregator of all the stuff we’re learning from each other.

Who is your target audience?

LIS students and professionals, especially those trying to explore or navigate into broader career opportunities that will use their information skills.

What’s the best way to use your site? Should users consult it daily? Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

I’d say noodle around. All of the posts are tagged by a specific category, so if users are interested in a specific topic, they should be able find all the posts on that topic. My goal is to post weekly, although as I mentioned, that’s currently aspirational rather than reality!

Does your site provide:

Interviews   Answers to reader questions
Articles/literature    Links
Research   Coaching
The opportunity for interaction

Advice on:
Networking

Other: emerging types of LIS career paths and how to explore/position for them

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats?

Book(s): Rethinking Information Work (Libraries Unlimited, 2006), LIS Career Sourcebook (Libraries Unlimited, 2012)
 Other: LIS career webinars and workshops for MLIS programs and LIS associations, divisions, and chapters

Do you charge for anything on your site?

No

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

I’ve actually never tracked this information so have no idea!

meredith loweAnything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

Hmmm…. I think I’d encourage your readers to think as broadly and creatively about the application of their LIS skills as possible in order to find jobs, and then continue to keep an eye out for “alternative uses” even after landing those jobs. Given this economy, I believe it’s really important to operate as if we’re all self-employed, regardless of where we happen to be working at any given point in our careers. My goal is to help LIS students and professional create resilient careers, which often means rethinking what we do, how we do it, and who we do it for.

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Job Hunter’s Web Guide: Careers in Law Librarianship

I’m happy to be able to share today’s site with you. It is an excellent example of the services our professional associations can provide for job hunters and prospective librarians. Today we are featuring Careers in Law Librarianship, a site run by the American Association of Law Librarians (AALL). Wendy E. Moore, who is the Chair of the AALL Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee as well as the Acquisitions Librarian, University of Georgia Law Library, was gracious enough to answer my questions. I hope you will enjoy!


Careers in Law Librarianship

What is it? Please give us your elevator speech!

Careers in Law Librarianship is a portal to link people interested in law librarianship with information about educational requirements, career possibilities, types of law libraries, and sources of financial assistance.

When was it started? Why was it started?

It started about five years ago or so. It was created to have a single source to share with people interested in law librarianship which would be easy to find using a search engine.

Who runs it?

The site is run by the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL), an organization with over 5,000 members, which was founded in 1906 to promote and enhance the value of law libraries to the legal and public communities, to foster the profession of law librarianship, and to provide leadership in the field of legal information.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I am not a “career expert,” although I have been a librarian for almost 20 years. I am currently the Chair of the AALL Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee.

Who is your target audience?

Anyone interested in learning more about careers in law librarianship. Many of our users either already have a JD degree or an MLS degree and our seeking information about what additional educational requirements they may need and for how to network with law librarians in their region.

What’s the best way to use your site? Should users consult it daily? Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

Our site is a great place to get started to understand some of the unique aspects to careers in law librarianship. It directs users to additional information at the AALL website including lists of dual JD/MLS programs, job positings, and scholarship opportunities from various AALL regional Chapters, Special Interest Sections, and Caucuses.

Does your site provide:

√ Answers to reader questions
√ Links

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats?

Our site is not active on social media, but the American Association of Law Libraries AALL is active on the following:
√ Twitter: @aallnet
LinkedIn
Facebook
Newsletter
√ Magazine or other periodical: AALL Spectrum
Blog
Flickr

Do you charge for anything on your site?

No, our site is free to all.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

Since the site is an information portal, we don’t really track or follow-up on specific job positions people who use our site eventually find. We have through the site been able to match up people interested in learning more about law librarianship with law librarians in their local area, so I consider that a successful outcome of the site.

wendy mooreAnything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

Law Librarianship is a very specialized form of librarianship. The more flexible you are concerning your geographic location, the easier time you will have in securing a position. Also carefully read the educational and experience requirements in job ads and make certain you meet (or will meet before the start date) those requirements before applying for a position as the requirements are usually not flexible.

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Job Hunter’s Web Guide: MLA Deal

One thing this blog has made me aware of is all the different ways that state library associations help out job hunters. You know how it’s super tough to get that very first library job?  And how sometimes new professionals feel a little hung out to dry once they’ve graduated?  Well, this week’s post is about  a Maryland resource which helps address that problem, and provides a lot of great support for developing a library career.  This week we’re featuring MLA Deal!


MLA Deal

What is it? Please give us your elevator speech!

DEAL (Development of Emerging and Aspiring Librarians) is an interest group of the Maryland Library Association (MLA) dedicated to providing new professionals and library students with resources to create the library career they want.

When was it started? Why was it started?

MLA has had a student interest group for some time now, but around Spring of 2011 Mark de Jong, our Chair, started talking seriously about revamping it. Through his direction and the vision and efforts of our team, we’ve relaunched the group, expanded its audience, and reignited interest in MLA! Our main goal was to help those new to librarianship (early-career librarians, students, and library techs) navigate the waters of employment, providing opportunities to network and explore the profession and giving them tools to get the jobs they wanted.

Who runs it?

Mark de Jong, an active member of MLA, is our Chair. But in reality we have a much more decentralized approach. There’s a somewhat large group of us (around 12), but we’ve each got dedicated roles. I’m the social media manager, so I oversee our Twitter & LinkedIn accounts, as well as some of the blog.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I’m hesitant to call myself a career expert, but being in school and concerned about finding a job that used my degree has provided plenty of motivation for me to research different career options! The thing about the DEAL leadership team that I love so much is that we represent such different paths for information professionals. For instance, Lindsay Sarin (our mentorship expert and conference liaison) is a coordinator for University of Maryland’s MLS program, so her job is to help library school students think strategically about their time in school and how it relates to their career goals. Katy Berube, who contributes to our blog, is an academic librarian with an immense wealth of HR knowledge that we’re lucky to draw from. We’ve all got different strengths and areas of expertise, and together it helps to enrich the kind of career development programming that DEAL offers.

Who is your target audience?

While our aim is to help library school students and new-to-the-field professionals, we also reach out to those who are more established in their careers for advice and mentorship opportunities.

What’s the best way to use your site? Should users consult it daily? Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

Everyone should use all of our web presences daily- just kidding! We actually have a multi-platform approach for our group with the intention that people could participate as much or as little as they wanted. Our blog is our main programming focus, featuring bi-monthly career development posts by the aforementioned Katy. These posts are designed to be followed almost as steps for building networks, finding relevant job postings, writing resumes, cover letters, etc. We also post news related items and job/internship/volunteer opportunities on the blog. Our LinkedIn group builds on Katy’s programming, serving as a space for people to connect and share how they’ve worked through her blog challenges. The group is also a place for general networking and discussion. Lastly, our Twitter is meant to be an everyday news item source. I do some relevant job/internship/volunteer opportunity posts, but also share general career advice, publicize good professional resources (like Hiring Librarians!) and interesting tidbits from Libraryland.

DEAL_logo

Does your site provide:

√ Job Listings √ Answers to reader questions
√ Articles/literature √ Links
√ Coaching √ The opportunity for interaction
Advice on:
√ Cover Letters √ Resumes
√ Interviewing √ Networking

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats?

√ Twitter: @MLA_DEAL
LinkedIn
√ Newsletter: well, you can sign up for our listserv on the MLA site!
√ Other: BlogMLA site

Do you charge for anything on your site?

Nope! Access to all of our resources are free. We do encourage people to join MLA, however. We’ve been able to secure a lot of funding through our scholarship program, which allows current MLA members to contribute the cost of a year-long student membership to MLA. We’ve received a ton of support on this initiative, including a rather generous donation from an HR and organizational development consulting company (thanks Singer Group!). As a group, we’re extremely proud to be able to offer this to our members.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

We’re still relatively new, and we just reached how to write resumes in our programming, so we haven’t had the chance to start making career connections. We have, however, been successful in finding students mentors, internships, field study sites, and even freelance work!

meredith loweAnything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

My personal piece of advice for job hunting isn’t necessarily unique, but has always proven wise in my experiences- be open, be professional, and be social! The last one can be hard for librarians, but every interesting work-related opportunity I’ve gotten has been a result of meeting people and staying in contact. You might meet someone in a hiring position for your dream organization, but at that moment they don’t have an open position perfect for you. Staying in contact and making a consistently good impression does wonders, though, and they’ll remember you when something comes up. Oh, also join your state library association! They’re an easy way to involved and you’ll definitely meet people who can connect you to job opportunities. If you’re a MD resident, contact us for details on how to get a free MLA membership!

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Job Hunter’s Web Guide: Careers in Federal Libraries

Want to work in the White House?  Today’s web resource is especially for you!  Careers in Federal Libraries is chock full of all kinds of information, from insider tips to job ads.  Don’t want to work in the White House?  Well, there are still any number of federal library jobs that might suit you.

Cifl

What is it?  Please give us your elevator speech!

Careers in Federal Libraries are events, virtual and F2F, that needed some way to continue the conversation about jobs for MLIS graduates.  We host programs at conferences, create webinars for library schools and have a blend of ways to keep the dialogue going.
We like to say that you can work for Federal government in lots of different jobs, anywhere around the world, in any type of library, and transfer between them without losing your benefits.  The average annual salary in 2009 was over $80,000 a year, so you don’t have to take a vow of poverty to be a federal employee.

When was it started?  Why was it started?

In 2007, we had our first event at the Library of Congress so job seekers could learn about the different career fields for those with their MLIS degree.  There are always questions when someone then applies or interviews for a federal job, so we wanted to be there to support folks through the entire process.  There are thousands following the various groups now (Google, LinkedIn, Twitter, WordPress, Facebook, Slideshare).

Who runs it?

Volunteer managers keep the various information flows going.  Right now  our managers include Nancy Faget, Tiffany Brand, Monique Clark, and Tori Moses.  If you’re interested in getting some experience managing a social media tool, drop us a line.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

A few of us have learned a lot through the years and enjoy keeping up on the latest news about hiring. The Careers in Federal Libraries list of speakers and presenters include hiring officials, personnel specialists, resume reviewers, and those who have experience in the hiring process.  We try to bring in the best on certain topics, but especially those with an MLIS so they have a good feel for the audience interests.

Who is your target audience?

The student or job seeker likely doesn’t know about the variety of ways they can work for Federal government.  We want them to think creatively about their job hunt, especially in a tough market, and consider alternative careers.  Would you like to be a web content manager?  Do you like research, writing, and editing?  Would you have an interest in analyzing data?  Can you see yourself working as a social media specialist?  There are TONS of options, and you should be aware of them if you’re looking for a job.

What’s the best way to use your site?  Should users consult it daily?  Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

The Google Group for Careers in Federal Libraries sends out job announcements, and they’re well integrated with the other media tools.  You can get our job announcements from the blog, for example.  The best way we’ve found to consolidate Q&A is on the LinkedIn group, and that really facilitates crowdsourcing advice.  We would suggest looking at the various tools and seeing what helps you.  Let us know if we  should add some service that is missing.

Do your sites provide:

√ Job Listings √ Answers to reader questions
√ Articles/literature √ Links
√ The opportunity for interaction

Advice on:
√ Cover Letters √ Resumes
√ Interviewing √ Networking
√ Other: mentoring

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats? Please include links, subscription information, or other details if pertinent

√ Twitter: @CareersFedLib
LinkedIn
√ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/FederalLibrary
√ Other:  Slideshare account, Google Group

ALA will be hosting a series of webinars soon on Careers in Federal Libraries.
You can participate in F2F events at ALA, SLA, MLA, and AALL conferences.

Do you charge for anything on your site?

We don’t think anyone should charge job seekers for this information.  Helping people find jobs is one thing librarians help others do, and the Careers in Federal Libraries site is just librarians helping librarians find jobs.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

It’s been rewarding to see people learn about the special programs like the Presidential Management Fellows program that fast-tracks you into management.  Those jobs are really great in that they move you from $50K a year to $89K a year in 3 years giving you great experience along the way.  When librarians learn about the State Department’s Information Resource Officers — librarians who live around the world doing “information diplomacy” — there are tons that line up to learn about it and get assistance in applying.  Seeing the very smart candidates use very saavy job hunting tactics is interesting.  One librarian visited lots of libraries, took pictures and recorded interviews with staff, blogged and promoted the library, and then sent the library a link to the marketing she did on their behalf.  Guess it was no surprise that she got a great offer, right?

Anything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

Job hunting in Federal government is pretty unique.  There’s a system like no other, but we all know that it’s a big bureaucracy.   Let us help you navigate that system.   You’ll find you’re able to do remarkable things as a civil servant that you never envisioned you could do.  It’s amazing to have words you’ve written read in Congressional testimony.  It’s incredible to know you helped research policy that became a new law in the country.   Librarians know they can make a positive difference, and in Federal government you can impact the country.  How cool is that?

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Job Hunter’s Web Guide: Library Jobline

Today’s web resource is a state-focused page: it’s Colorado’s Library Jobline. Not being from Colorado myself, I actually learned about it in a very vain way – they link to Hiring Librarians! Even if you’re not from Colorado, take a look.  They’ve got a helpful resources page, and (as we’ll find out at the end of the interview) they do have opportunities for librarians from all over. Plus they’re collecting data about library jobs, and giving you the opportunity to access it, should you want to do your own research project.

Library jobline

What is it?  Please give us your elevator speech!

LibraryJobline is a service of the Colorado State Library that gives employers and job seekers in/around Colorado a place to connect.

When was it started?  Why was it started?

LibraryJobline went live in January 2007.  Prior to LibraryJobline, the Colorado State Library posted job ads on its own website.  We decided to streamline the process by creating a dedicated site where employers could post and manage their own ads, and where job seekers could easily find them.  It also is a valuable tool for collecting data on the job climate in Colorado.  We report our findings at http://www.lrs.org/fastfacts.php.

Who runs it?

It is run by Library Research Service, a unit of the Colorado State Library.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

We do not currently offer career advice our guidance, though we do have a “Resources” page where we link to external content.

Who is your target audience?

Employers and job seekers within/around Colorado.

What’s the best way to use your site?  Should users consult it daily?  Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

The best way to use the site is to create an account and customize your profile so that you receive email notifications when jobs match your criteria.  For example, you can choose the type of library, salary, and education requirements that best fit you.  You also get a custom RSS feed that displays relevant jobs.

LibraryJobline also has a search page, giving you a handy tool for researching previous job ads.  You can quickly and easily view data for the 2000+ jobs that have been posted since 2007.

Does your site provide:

√ Job Listings               Links                      

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats? Please include links, subscription information, or other details if pertinent

√ Twitter: https://twitter.com/libraryjobline

Do you charge for anything on your site?

Nope.  It is 100% free for employers and job seekers.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

Not applicable.

Anything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

Although LibraryJobline is a product of the Colorado State Library, we accept and encourage job ads from all libraries, regardless of location.

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Job Hunter’s Web Guide: Archives Gig

This week we’re showcasing a resource for the archivists out there.  I don’t know much about archives and archivists, so I’m glad to be able to learn more with Meredith Lowe, and her awesome resource: Archives Gig.

Archives Gig

What is it?  Please give us your elevator speech!

I curate postings of careers, jobs, and internships in the world of archives & records management, and post them to Archives Gig.

When was it started?  Why was it started?

Archives Gig was created on February 5, 2010.  As part of my job, I was contributing to the student job listserv at the University of Wisconsin – Madison SLIS.  I thought that I could benefit a broader group of people by making a public website, so that’s what drove the creation of the site.  I really enjoy looking at all of the opportunities out there, too, so running AG is a fun hobby.

Who runs it?

Just me!  I have a MA in Library and Information Studies, with a concentration in archives, from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  My training largely informs my decisions about which jobs I post.  I currently work in Continuing Education Services at UW-Madison SLIS, so I coordinate continuing education and training for librarians and information professionals.  Check out our offerings at http://www.slis.wisc.edu/continueed.htm.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I’m not a “career expert.”  I just post jobs that fall within the purview of the site.

Who is your target audience?

Archivists, records managers, and students.  I post jobs at all levels, from internships to directors.  Anyone who is interested in the current archives/RM career landscape would certainly find a lot of information here.

What’s the best way to use your site?  Should users consult it daily?  Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

I generally post daily on weekdays, and I exclusively post job announcements.  It’s in a blog format, so the most recent post goes up top. If you’re actively job hunting, check in at least weekly (or set yourself up to receive Twitter or Facebook alerts).  If you’re just casually interested in what’s out there right now, consult AG at your leisure.

Each job posting gets tagged with keywords that you can use to narrow your search. If you look at the main page (http://archivesgig.livejournal.com), the tags are listed down the left side of the screen.  The quick and dirty trick to searching: I always tag the state/geographical region of every job’s location, whether it’s permanent or temporary, and what kind of institution it’s in. For example, if I tag something as “status: internship”, and if you click that tag in the list, every entry that received that tag will come up (the most recent will be at the top of the page). If you’re looking for all jobs in a certain state (let’s say Iowa), go to the tag list on the left side of the page and look for “State: Iowa.” One caveat: the “skills” tags are NOT comprehensive. I often get a little more detailed with the tags, and specify particular skill sets that a job demands – but that’s basically if I have time to do so!

Does your site provide:

√  Job Listings

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats?

√  Twitter: @archivesgig
√  Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/archivesgig
√  Other:  RSS feed: http://archivesgig.livejournal.com/data/rss

Do you charge for anything on your site?

Free! It’s completely free for anyone to search.  If someone wants me to post a job, that’s also free.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

I’m always thrilled to hear from someone who found their job through Archives Gig.  It’s my mission to make job hunting in this tight market just a little easier.  I have heard from several archivists who found their jobs through AG, which makes my day every time.

meredith loweAnything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

This is especially directed toward the newly graduated job seekers: Be Flexible.  If you can’t find your dream job in your ideal location, try and look for other positions (or other places) that you’re qualified to do, and that will give you some professional experience.  You’ll certainly learn something new, and you may find a job in a different area of the profession is a great fit.

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