Category Archives: Southern US

We require some experience. It is a library practice, not an official requirement.

Market day, Killarney 2This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Instruction and reference librarians

This librarian works at a library with 0-10 staff members in a rural area in the Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Had the skills and the requirements that we listed in the advertisement/position description.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

A search committee is established prior to advertising the position, and those on the committee evaluate the applications. At our institution, HR does not screen applicants.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Failure to have the skills and the requirements that we listed in the advertisement/position description.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

I can’t stress this enough: in one’s cover letter and resume, identify where one’s skills and experiences match or closely relate to the requirements that are listed in the advertisement/position description.

I want to hire someone who is

qualified

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 0-10

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: None full time, but we have hired two half-time librarians

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: none

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

We require some experience. It is a library practice, not an official requirement.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

As long as academic librarians and libraries integrate themselves into the instructional and research activities in their institution, and prove themselves, the library will be alive and well.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

No

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 0-10 staff members, Academic, Rural area, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015

Can carry an intelligent conversation

Market scene. Women and men. 1922 2This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Reference Librarian, Cataloger

This librarian works at a library with 0-10 staff members in a rural area in the Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 51-75 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

MLS degree, can carry an intelligent conversation, positive work experience/skills

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

Applications are evaluated by the library director and a committee.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Inexperience, lack of required degree

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Practice interviewing

I want to hire someone who is

awesome

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 0-10

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: 0

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: 0

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

No

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

Information professionals are needed due to the information explosion.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

No

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 0-10 staff members, Academic, Rural area, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015

Still, a lot of what I learned in library school was not at all useful to my job.

Queipo Market in Little Havana - MiamiThis anonymous interview is with an employee from a public library who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. When asked, “Are you a librarian?” the respondent said “It’s complicated.” This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Reference, Management, Children’s, potentially Tech Services

This person works at a library with 0-10 staff members in a rural area in the Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Having minimum skills and experience to do the job.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

By me (Director) and supervisory staff.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Lack of education or experience

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: only interns

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Get relevant experience through volunteering or internships.

I want to hire someone who is

a team-player

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 0-10

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 1

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Depends

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

The field has changed, but the need for compassionate people to help find information and build communities has not.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

I could go on, but I think my situation is not typical. Still, a lot of what I learned in library school was not at all useful to my job. Job seekers need to be good at flexibility, have other talents besides library-specific ones, and not be wedded to whatever they thought they wanted to do if they want to remain relevant.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 0-10 staff members, Public, Rural area, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015

Read the ad!

View of street vendors at 7th and B Streets, NW (Ca. 1880) MarketThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Catalogers and metadata specialists, e-resource librarians, special collections, collection development.

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Met qualifications with appropriate education and experience.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

A committee reviews each application, comparing to a checklist of qualifications based on the position description.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

No appropriate experience.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: if they ask

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Read the ad! Write a cover letter that demonstrates you understand the position. Highlight appropriate experience.

I want to hire someone who is

self-starter

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

We require at least some relevant experience, such as an internship.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

 

 

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area

When I open my saved bookmarks, Google Chrome asks me if I’m sure I want to open that many

Librarian working at the Pointe Coupee Parish Parish library in New Roads Louisiana in 1936This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, at the following levels: Entry level. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

As an intern, I worked for two years in reference and instruction in a large academic library, and for a little over a year in a special library.

This job hunter is in an city/town, in the Southern US,  and is willing to move within the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic region.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

I’m looking for something that will allow me to grow professionally, something that will allow me to have an impact on the organization/institution/community, and something with a high enough salary to allow me to pay off my student loans.

Where do you look for open positions?

When I open my saved bookmarks, Google Chrome asks me if I’m sure I want to open that many…ALA Joblist, library associations for the states I’m open to, INALJ, LisList, professional listservs, the jobs email list for my library school.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I usually print off the job description so that I can annotated it, and I do a little research on the institution/library to see what kind of place it is. Then I go to my collection of resumes and cover letters and see if anything that I’ve written before matches the job description. If so, I tweak those documents to fit the job description. Depending on how much tweaking needs to be done, I probably spend about 5-6 hours on each application, usually over the course of 3-4 days.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: I have been a bit vague sometimes, but haven’t lied.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Being able to present

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

I think they should write clear job descriptions – don’t rely on jargon to fill it up. Advertise the job widely on listservs and job boards. Post the salary range. Don’t make candidates jump through a ton of hoops to apply (cover letter! resume! reference letters in advance! official copies of transcripts! teaching philosophy/statement on __________! oh, and please mail it all to us!).

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Be as timely as you can – I’m applying to academic libraries, and there is really no good reason that a hiring process should take 6 months from job posting to offer being made. Communicate with applicants to appraise them of where the search committee is in the hiring process. I actually prefer when communication goes through HR or someone other than someone on the search committee – the process seems to go more smoothly, for some reason.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I haven’t been hired for a full-time position yet, but I think it’s a combination of a lot of factors. To start with, I think you need to have relevant experience/education, and then present yourself well in your application materials. But then there’s a certain level of luck/chance – what jobs are available and who else is applying for them. You may apply for and interview well for a job that you’re well qualified for, but you still may not get the job because another candidate was even more qualified than you.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

1 Comment

Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Southern US

I’m only applying to federal jobs and public colleges and universities where the salary range is usually posted.

Geraldine Fain Browses in the Free LibraryThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries and Federal  libraries, at the following levels: Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory. This job hunter is in a city/town, in the Southern US, and is searching for work in a particular city.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

In no particular order: A place that supports professional development. A place where I don’t mind coming to work every day. A place that pays me well enough to sustain myself and pay off my student loans.

Where do you look for open positions?

Various listservs (the good jobs are usually posted on them the aggregator sites like INALJ.) State Library Association website Employer’s website Indeed INALJ USA Jobs

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other: I’m only applying to federal jobs and public colleges and universities where the salary range is usually posted.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I read the job description several times to make sure that I meet most (if not all) of the qualifications. I have several resumes and CVs that I work from, so I usually customize one of them for the position to which I’m applying. Since I’m working full time, it often takes me a week or two to finish an application packet.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary
√ Being able to present
√ Other: How knowledgeable the search committee is about the position. I went to one interview where the search committee head could hardly answer my questions.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

I work in academia so I know the hiring process can be glacial. I just ask to be kept in the loop about my status as a candidate.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Meeting the job qualifications, developing a rapport with the search committee, and presenting yourself well.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Southern US

Pay them enough. Hire other bright people. Trust them to do their jobs well until proven otherwise.

Nevins Memorial Library First Librarians c. 1900This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, at the following levels: Entry level. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience.:

I am in my second year of an MSLS program and will graduate in May. I have worked at the same job for two years, which is with a private, religious-affiliated college in its archives. I have appraised, processed, described, and digitized collections. I worked in a public library as an assistant in the circulation and reference departments before attending library school. I also volunteered as a museum intern for a local history society and as a processing intern for a state archive.

This job hunter is in a city/town, in the Southern US, and is willing to move anywhere in the Southeast.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Ability to cover my expenses, an environment that encourages development as a professional, and the ability to showcase my skills

Where do you look for open positions?

Archives Gig, job listserv through my graduate program, professional listservs, INALJ

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Read the job announcement, tailor the resume and cover letter to highlight skills mentioned in the announcement, proofread, and submit. It generally takes two hours.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Pay them enough. Hire other bright people. Trust them to do their jobs well until proven otherwise.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

I really hate Skype interviews. I realize that it’s supposed to save candidates and institutions some money, but they’re always awkward.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Being genuine. You won’t fit every situation, so it’s far better to be honest about who you are so that you’re hired into the right place.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under Academic, Archives, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Southern US

The applicant has to have confidence in themselves and that comes through in a phone interview.

Paramaribo market scene. Women and men. 1922.This anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

County Librarians for 4 county libraries.

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a rural area in the Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

They have to fit the criteria for the position, education, MLS, experience in a public library, supervisory skills, and people skills.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

We are a rural Regional Library. We had a committee to hire for that particular county library that consisted of some of the local board members and the Director of the Regional Library. The consensus between all is important but the ultimate decision is made by the Regional Library Director. In this case, we all agreed on the hire.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Lack of education, lack of experience, false information on their resume, inability to produce documents that we requested for the application, and poorly written resumes.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

A well written cover letter, a complete application package, and the MLS. The applicant has to have confidence in themselves and that comes through in a phone interview. We have a phone interview first and if that goes well, an in-person interview.

I want to hire someone who is

knowledgeable

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 1

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: 0

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Yes, we require, at least, 3 years of experience in a public library. We could consider someone with less if they have other good qualifications.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

Librarianship is continually changing, but the need for information will always be there.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Public, Rural area, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015

Many resumes are so general, they in no way reflect the applicant has the skills, experience or even interest in the actual position.

Queipo Market in Little Havana - MiamiThis anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Catalogers, children’s librarians, general reference/adult librarians, and director

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a mix of an urban and rural area in the Western US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Met minimum qualifications of a Masters degree or experience.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

The hiring manager reviews and weeds out applications.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Not qualified.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Read the job description and make sure the resume aligns with qualifications and job duties. Many resumes are so general, they in no way reflect the applicant has the skills, experience or even interest in the actual position.

I want to hire someone who is

Able

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 1

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are more positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

In practice, if a minimum experience is required, only those people are interviewed.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

I believe specialization, and a growing dependency on technology, professional partnerships and societal workforce demands for better educated people is driving a greater need for professional librarians.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Public, Rural area, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area

it’s important to approach each item as your chance to convince the reviewer that you’re a good candidate for the job, even if it means repeating yourself

Vegetable and flower seller and stall, Pike Place Market, Seattle, WashingtonThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Instruction/Reference Librarians (full and part time) and paraprofessionals.

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a suburban area in the Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ more than 75 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

Minimum qualifications for the job are met in terms of experience, degree, and skills. The applicant turned in all application materials.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

HR puts in some disqualifying questions (e.g. “Do you have an MLIS or equivalent?” that will prevent the person from applying if they answer no. Otherwise, the chair and the rest of the search committee have access to all applicants. In theory, the chair/hiring manager can remove applicants without input from the rest of the committee, but that rarely happens. How the committee chooses to screen the applicants beyond the minimum requirements and legalities is up to the committee. It could be rubrics, gut feelings, etc.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

We generally have enough applicants that we are able to only interview the candidates who really stand out as promising. On the first pass, I tend to eliminate applicants who do not show a genuine interest in the job (e.g. the cover letter is generic), have made numerous spelling or careless errors (e.g. wrong library is named). When narrowing to those we’ll actually interview, I look for relevant skills and interest in the job as well as enthusiasm and evidence of motivation.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: I have, when asked, but I have to be careful because I’m not allowed to tell them why they were not selected.

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Realize that those in hiring positions have different techniques for selecting candidates. I always start with the cover letter, but I know others who start with resumes or the online application. Because of this, it’s important to approach each item as your chance to convince the reviewer that you’re a good candidate for the job, even if it means repeating yourself.

I want to hire someone who is

excited

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

This has recently changed (fortunately), from “one year experience required” to “one year experience preferred.” I can’t get them to change it to “Entry level.” The practice varies depending on the hiring manager; some value experience while others prefer new perspectives and skills.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

As an academic librarian at a community college, I see daily how important it is for us to teach students to not only find information, but evaluate it for appropriate quality and fit. The danger, I think, is in how the world perceives us; if enough people think we’re irrelevant, then we are irrelevant. The challenge is in getting our value recognized.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Suburban area