Category Archives: Stats and Graphs

Stats and Graphs: Privacy and Personal Professional Websites

Hello!

Back in June I put out a survey for LIS folks who have their own personal professional websites (kind of a mouthful, but it still seems like the best way to say it – I welcome your thoughts). 28 people responded, providing information about how, why, and what they put online.

As with all of my surveys, it’s still open! If you have your own website and would like to tell us about it, please go to the form here.

Today we are looking at the personal aspect of personal professional websites. I’m interested in how much personal information people are willing to share, and how any privacy concerns might be mitigated.

You will see that the majority of folks (22 out of 28) share their bio, and only slightly fewer (21 out of 28) share their photo.

Bar graph of responses to "Which of the following content do you have on your site (check all that apply)?"

Which of the following content do you have on your site (check all that apply)?

Resume or CV 15 (53.6%)
Descriptions or list of services you provide 8 (28.6%)
Blog about personal topics 7 (25%)
Blog about professional topics 11 (39.3%)
Book reviews 2 (7.1%)
Work Samples 12 (42.9%)
List of publications 17 (60.7%)
List of presentations 17 (60.7%)
References, testimonials and/or press 6 (21.4%)
Twitter or other social media feed 18 (64.3%)
Your Bio 23 (82.1%)
Your photo 22 (78.6%)
art 1 (3.6%)

The chart below shows that only half the respondents share an email or contact form.

Chart of personal links or connection methods provided on website. Contents in following text

Which of the following personal links or connection methods do you have on your site (check all that apply)?

Email 14 (51.9%)
Contact Form 14 (51.9%)
Form for people to subscribe to your content 2 (7.4%)
ORCiD 8 (29.6%)
GitHub 4 (14.8%)
Twitter 21 (77.8%)
Facebook 3 (11.1%)
Instagram 7 (25.9%)
LinkedIn 14 (51.9%)
Pinterest 0 (0%)
TikTok 1 (3.7%)
Tumblr 2 (7.4%)
YouTube 5 (18.5%)
Business phone number 1 (3.7%)
Reddit 1 (3.7%)

I will break out the email/contact form portion of this question a little further. One person did not respond to this question. Of the 27 remaining respondents, 8 provided email, 8 provided a contact form, 6 provided both a contact form and an email, and 5 provided neither an email or a contact form. These last 5 provided instead:

  • GitHub, Twitter
  • ORCiD, GitHub, LinkedIn
  • Form for people to subscribe to your content, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn
  • ORCiD, Twitter
  • Twitter, LinkedIn

Do you have any privacy concerns associated with sharing your personal information, resume, etc., on a public website? If so, what measures do you take to feel safer?

  • Yes, I took my CV off after my course was done for this reason.
  • Yes, I am leery of my work being stolen or reused without permission. I add copyright statements to everything.
  • I do worry about plagiarism because I do have former assignments up there that I have considered taking down. As for personal information, the items that are up there are all stuff that’s easily found anyway.
  • I leave off graduation dates b/c of concerns over age discrimination. all my work info is discoverable on google anyway, so I don’t worry about that.
  • I do not share where I am working or have worked on my website. I do not share my location or personal information. My bio is professional accomplishments, education and industry involvement.
  • Somewhat concerned, but I’m not too worried based on my content (not too popular). I don’t know if WordPress has any safety measures, or what kind of measures to take.
  • I don’t share a full CV or my address or anything, so no
  • I selectively leave out certain information about myself for content on the website
  • A little. I try not to put any more on there than what’s available on other platforms like LinkedIn or Twitter.
  • No, I don’t share a full resume
  • I don’t have concerns about the things that I share on my site. The things that I don’t want to be public for privacy reasons don’t get published.
  • I have a public resume on my website which does not list my address/phone/email address.
  • I have separate personal and professional social media accounts. I was thinking I should password protect my family history pages for the moment. No personal info on living individuals but just to be sure.
  • I do, but don’t take any particular measures other than not providing phone or physical address
    Somewhat concerned, I have my linkedin attached but that is publicly available. I am considering removing my email address and just having a contact form.
  • no phone number, address, or clickable contact links
  • I write under a pen name so my site isn’t directly connected to me personally.
  • no privacy concerns
  • I don’t share anything that I consider private (and I know that the distinction is subjective).
  • Business email and business phone line. I’ve never had a problem with those avenues being used for unprofessional purposes.
  • Not significantly, but I recognize the privilege that comes with that.
  • As a straight, cishet, white man (among many other privileges), I can be visible online without facing attacks or abuse. I know of other professionals (e.g. women of color) who maintain a minimal online presence because their identities are more vulnerable in our society. In a way, this is an example of the advantages that accrue to the already-privileged.
  • I use a contact form to avoid providing my email

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Stats and Graphs: Who makes hiring decisions at your organization?

At this point I am not new to libraries, nor am I new to hiring, and I still find it weird and confusing that the person who initially screens your application is not likely to be a person who interviews you, and neither of those people may actually make the hiring decision. And your eventual supervisor may be yet a whole nother person who you don’t see at all in the hiring process.

So I have a few questions in the Return to Hiring Librarians survey that are designed to highlight this chain in the LIS hiring process. One is:

image of survey question. text reads: Who makes hiring decisions at your organization (check all that apply): HR, Library Administration, The position's supervisor, a committee or panel, employees at the position's same level (on a panel or otherwise), other

182 people responded to the survey. As you can see in the chart below, many of them took full advantage of the “other” option.

Chart of answers to "Who makes hiring decisions at your organization?" answers listed in text below this image

HR | 42 (23.1%)
Library Administration | 106 (58.2%)
The position’s supervisor | 122 (67%)
A Committee or panel | 99 (54.4%)
Employees at the position’s same level (on a panel or otherwise) | 30 (16.5%)

Other answers:

  • a committee narrows down, recommends, then prioritizes names…the chair of the committee (typically the supervisor of the committee) can then move the same names along or overturn, HR does final vetting but only something like a failed criminal background check would prompt HR to overturn/send it back. My AVP typically vets and approves, before HR.
  • Executive Director 
  • Library Administration, upon the recommendation of search committee 
  • VP of Academics & President of College
  • The committee may include a faculty member from the area the librarian will be supporting 
  • I just wanted to specify that directors are hired by the library board’s personnel committee and the directors hire the rest of their staff.
  • The position’s supervisor and one other manager in the hiring department
  • County administration, library commission (governing board) 
  • The position’s supervisor, and Director 
  • A search committee recommends to the dean, who makes the final decision in consultation with the supervisor where needed
  • For leadership positions we include at least one staff member who would report directly to them
  • We take feedback from all staff members and have a coffee time where everyone can meet the candidates
  • Staff hired by Director; Director hired by Library Board
  • Provost or other principal administrator
  • The Dean makes the final decision but the search committee provides a report and everyone in the library provides feedback.
  • Director 
  • Panel recommendations are reviewed by Director 
  • We’re a small, rural library. No HR dept. Hiring decisions are ultimately made by director, with input from the respective Dept head
  • Search committee makes recommendation to dean
  • Department head (who is usually the supervisor for the position).
  • If a position is of a supervisor/”librarian” level, there may be a committee of admin and/or the position’s supervisor
  • Principal
  • Library Board
  • CEO

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Stats and Graphs: How many pages should a resume/CV/cover letter be?

It’s Staturday!

In the old survey, this was two questions, “How many pages should a cover letter be?” and “How many pages should a resume/CV be?” Invariably, people wanted to explain that the second question was invalid and resumes and CVs were *not* the same thing, and the question was *terrible.* And those people were basically right, but at that point I had already published the question and couldn’t think of a way to make it better anyway.

So when I was testing the current survey I was so blown away when Marleah Augustine suggested I should just make it a matrix question. What a simple and elegant solution.

The question is:

Question from survey. Text reads 11. How many pages should each of these documents be? Choices on the Y axis are Cover Letter, Resume and CV. Choices on X axis are We don't ask for this, Only One!, Two is ok but no more, As many as it takes but keep it reasonable and relevant, and As many as it takes I love reading.

As of August 4, 2022, 182 people have responded to this survey. Their answers to this question are:

Bar chart of question answers. Chart explained in text that follows this.

For Cover Letters

We don’t ask for this | 23 (12.6%)

Only One! | 90 (49.5%)

Two is ok, but no more | 54 (29.7%)

As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant | 17 (9.3%)

As many as it takes, I love reading | 0 (0%)

For Resumes

We don’t ask for this | 14 (7.7%)

Only One! | 19 (10.4%)

Two is ok, but no more | 68 (37.4%)

As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant | 76 (41.8%)

As many as it takes, I love reading | 2 (1%)

For CVs

We don’t ask for this | 79 (43.4%)

Only One! | 4 (2.2%)

Two is ok, but no more | 12 (6.6%)

As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant | 76 (41.8%)

As many as it takes, I love reading | 4 (2.2%)


This is one of the few questions that doesn’t include a write in option. But, I’d still love to know what you think! Comment or tweet at me, and don’t forget to like and subscribe to this YouTube channel.

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Filed under 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Stats and Graphs

Stats and Graphs: Personal Professional Websites

Hello!

Last month I put out a survey for LIS folks who have their own personal professional websites (kind of a mouthful, but it still seems like the best way to say it – I welcome your thoughts). 27 people responded, providing information about how, why, and what they put online. I’m working through the responses slowly, but I wanted to get up some initial aggregated results.

As with all of my surveys, it’s still open! If you have your own website and would like to tell us about it, please go to the form here.

15 of the 28 questions are closed-ended. Here are charts from 3 of those:

Pie graph of responses to "Did you pay someone to design and build your site?"

Did you pay someone to design or build your site?

I paid for a template (or templates) 4 (14.8%)
No 22 (81.5%)
Other 1 (3.7%)

Bar graph of responses to "Which of the following content do you have on your site (check all that apply)?"

Which of the following content do you have on your site (check all that apply)?

Resume or CV 15 (55.6%)
Descriptions or list of services you provide 8 (29.6%)
Blog about personal topics 6 (22.2%)
Blog about professional topics 10 (37%)
Book reviews 1 (3.7%)
Work Samples 11 (40.7%)
List of publications 16 (59.3%)
List of presentations 17 (63%)
References, testimonials and/or press 6 (22.2%)
Twitter or other social media feed 17 (63%)
Your Bio 22 (81.5%)
Your photo 21 (77.8%)
art 1 (3.7%)

Bar graph of responses to "Is having a personal website a must?"

Is having a personal website a “must”?

Yes, for job hunters 6 (22.2%)
Yes, for librarians 2 (7.4%)
Yes, for people looking for speaking gigs 7 (25.9%)
Yes, for people who are independent contractors/freelancers 8 (29.6%)
Yes, for new LIS graduates 3 (11.1%)
Nope! Not at All! 15 (55.5%)
Other: 5 (18.5%)

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Stats and Graphs: When does your organization first provide salary information?

It’s Staturday!

Welcome to a Stats and Graphs post, in which I examine survey responses through stats and graphs!

The survey that I am calling Return to Hiring Librarians opened on March 25th, 2022. As of today, May 14th, 2022, we have 180 responses. There are 23 questions in the survey. 13 are open-ended and 10 are closed-ended. Of the closed-ended questions, only one measures an opinion (it’s a grid which asks: How many pages should a cover letter/resume/CV be?). The others are primarily demographics but do also ask for things like when salary information is first shared and what materials/tasks are asked for in the application and interview process.

The survey is still open. If you hire library workers, please consider filling it out.

In the past, I’ve posted the stats for all questions. I’m going to try just looking at one question at a time, plus demographics.


I’m starting with the question “When does your organization first provide salary information?” The recent post Currently, we’re over 300% turnover since 2016 and cannot attract candidates garnered some discussion which blamed the lack of candidates on not telling folks salary info until after they’d made an offer. While I think that the responses indicated much larger problems than that, I thought I’d take a look at the answers to the salary information question in aggregate.

The good news is that the majority (70%) provide salary information as part of the job ad. In addition, many folks who chose “other” described their desire to make this information available up front, and talked about either successfully lobbying for the change or feeling stymied by their organization’s refusal.

This survey does not use representative sampling, so it would not be appropriate to generalize for our larger population of LIS organizations. However, if your organization does not currently provide this information up front, it might be worth opening a discussion with your administration about the message it sends to candidates when salary is hidden.

Now might also be a good time to mention – this blog collects salary information from currently employed folks. You can contribute yours here. These links, along with the Interview Questions Repository, are always available in the sidebar over on the right there ——–>

When does your organization first provide salary information

Chart of responses to When does your organization first provide salary information

180 responses

It’s part of the job ad 126 (70%)

We only discuss after we’ve made an offer 19 (10.6%)

It’s part of the information provided at the interview 10 (5.6%)

Other 25 (13.88%)

  • I usually bring it up at the beginning of our phone interview. As in, this is when I need you to work and this is the salary range, does that work and would you like to proceed? Our pre-screen from HR asks for a range, we can usually meet or beat it.
  • Salary discussion is handled by the recruiter
  • It depends, but at my current place of work, we now put it in the ad.
  • Only when we make an offer, but I am hoping to change this.
  • I always list it when I hire, but the library board usually lists none or a range when hiring a director.
  • For most jobs it’s part of the ad, at least for the department I manage. There are some in the library who don’t want to include it, but I think it is an absolutely essential piece and I won’t post an ad for this department without one.
  • Our department lists the salaries in the job ad. It is inconsistent across the institution.
  • We list a range in the job ad, and that’s all I can speak to at the interview. HR determines their salary based on education and experience, and discusses specifics in the offer.
  • A range is usually provided during initial HR screening.
  • Pushing to put it in the ad, but it’s not always done
  • My institution does not allow us to post salary information. For staff hires, I provide salary and works schedules at the interview. For librarian (faculty) positions, it can be awkward to have that conversation during the interview with the committee present. I typically do a follow-up to the first interview with candidates we’re interested in bringing to campus that opens the door to discuss salary 1-1 before moving forward as a candidate.
  • We often mention in the ad that we need the states salary guidelines.
  • Only brought up when there’s an offer or is asked during the interview. Would prefer to put
  • We just started providing ranges or minimums in ads this year
  • It’s usually part of the online job description. Faculty are members of a bargaining unit so starting salaries are set in the CBA, but can also be negotiated.
  • The minimum is posted in the job ad (not a range) but is not discussed in detail until an offer is made.
  • It’s a separate phone call with HR that occurs between the first and second round interviews — I hate this system, but we don’t have any say in it.
  • the range is on the job ad, we can answer general questions, then HR makes their final after vetting
  • Desired salary is a question in the HR screening interview and the HR rep can provide the salary range
  • The salary range is provided as part of the interview and negotiated after the offer.
  • Our institution does not post salary information in job ads (which I cannot get them to budge on). So I provide it as soon as I reach out to schedule interviews.
  • Salary Range in job ad, specific salary with job offer
  • As of April 2022, it’s part of the job ad
  • For me, I didn’t find out salary until the interview. Since I started, the pay info is included in the job ad. we finally got our campus to share. As a state institution, there is one solid number. But it is uneven.

Demographics

What type of organization(s) do you hire for? (Check all that apply)

Chart of What type of organizations do you hire for?

180 responses

Academic Library 55 (30.6%)

Archives 16 (8.9%)

Public Library 96 (53.3%)

School Library 2 (1.1%)

Special Library 16 (8.9%)

Other 14 (7.77%)

What part of the world are you in?

Chart showing replies to "what part of the world are you in?"

179 Responses

Midwestern US 38 (21.2%)

Northeastern US 42 (23.5%)

Southeastern US 32 (17.9%)

Western US 28 (15.6%)

Southwestern US 17 (9.5%)

Australia/New Zealand 5 (2.8%)

Canada 8 (4.5%)

UK 1 (0.6%)

Texas 1 (0.6%)

Other 7 (3.91%)

What’s your region like? (Check all that apply)

Chart of responses to What's your region like?

179 Responses

Urban 79 (44.1%)

Suburban 86 (48%)

Rural 43 (24%)

Other 16 (8.93%)

How many staff members are at your organization?

177 responses

0-10 23 (13%)

11-50 65 (36.7%)

51-100 29 (16.4%)

101-200 26 (14.7%)

201+ 27 (15.3%)

Other 9 (5.08%)


I hope you have found, and will continue to find, the statistics and the individual responses interesting and useful. I’m very interested in any feedback or observations you might have. You can communicate with me here via comment, on Twitter @HiringLib, or by email at hiringlibrariansATgmail.

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Stats and Graphs: Quick and Dirty Results

TL;DR We need more responses from folks who hire in school and special libraries, archives, and for non-library LIS workers. If you have contacts in those areas, will you please help spread the word? People who do hiring can fill out the survey here. I also welcome ideas for places that I can post a call for responses.

Hi! It’s Staturday! Welcome to a Stats and Graphs post, in which I examine survey responses through stats and graphs!

The survey that I am calling Return to Hiring Librarians opened on March 25th, 2022. As of today, April 2nd, 2022, we have 145 responses. They are primarily from folks who hire in Public and Academic Libraries. There are 23 questions in the survey. 13 are open-ended and 10 are closed-ended. Of the closed-ended questions, only one measures an opinion (How many pages should a ___ be?). The others are primarily demographics but do also ask for things like when salary information is first shared and what materials/tasks are asked for in the application and interview process.

I hope you have found, and will continue to find, the individual responses interesting and useful. I’m very interested in any feedback or observations you might have. You can communicate with me here via comment, on Twitter @HiringLib, or by email at hiringlibrariansATgmail.

Thanks for reading!


Chart of responses to What type of organizations do you hire for? Responses detailed in post text

What type of organization(s) do you hire for? (Check all that apply)

145 responses

Academic Library 48 (33.1%)

Archives 14 (9.7%)

Public Library 82 (56.6%)

School Library 1 (.7%)

Special Library 7 (4.8%)

Other 8 (5.5%)

Chart of responses to Who makes hiring decisions at your organization? Responses detailed in post text

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization? (Check all that apply)

145 Responses

HR 31 (21.4%)

Library Administration 85 (58.6%)

The position’s supervisor 96 (66.2%)

A Committee or panel 81 (55.9%)

Employee’s at the position’s same level (on a committee or otherwise) 24 (16.6%)

Other 21 (14.5%)

Chart of responses to Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates? Responses detailed in post text

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates? (Check all that apply)

145 responses

Online application 108 (74.5%)

Cover Letter 98 67.6%)

Resume 101 (69.7%)

CV 43 (29.7%)

References 124 (85.5%)

Proof of degree 44 (30.3%)

Supplemental Questions 42 (29%)

Written Exam 8 (5.5%)

Oral Exam/Structured Interview 53 (36.6%)

Demonstration (teaching, storytime, etc.) 56 (38.6%)

More than one round of interviews 29 (20%)

A meal with hiring personnel 22 (15.2%)

Other 20 (13.8%)

Chart of responses to Does your organization use automated application screening? Responses detailed in post text

Does your organization use automated application screening?

144 responses

Yes 23 16%

No 110 76.4%

Other 11 7.6%

Chart of responses to How many pages should each of these documents be? Responses detailed in text that follows image

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter – “Only one!” followed by “Two is ok, but no more”

Resume – “As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant” followed by “Two is ok, but no more”

CV – “As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant” followed by “We don’t ask for this”

Chart of responses to When does your organization first provide salary information? Responses detailed in text that follows image

When does your organization first provide salary information?

145 responses

It’s part of the job ad 104 (71.7%)

We only discuss after we’ve made an offer 14 (9.7%)

It’s part of the information provided at the interview 6 (4.1%)

Other 21 (14.5%)

Chart of responses to What part of the world are you in? Responses detailed in text that follows image
What part of the world are you in?

144 responses

Midwestern US 32 (22.2%)

Northeastern US 32 (22.2%)

Southeastern US 25 (17.4%)

Western US 21 (14.6%)

Southwestern US 14 (9.7%)

Canada 7 (4.9%)

Australia/New Zealand 5 (3.5%)

UK 1 (0.7%)

Other 7 (4.9%)

Chart of responses to What's your region like? Responses detailed in text that follows image

What’s your region like? (Check all that apply)

144 responses

Urban 61 (42.4%)

Suburban 74 (51.4%)

Rural 36 (25%)

Other 10 (6.9%)

Chart of responses to Is your workplace remote/virtual? Responses detailed in text that follows image

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

145 responses

Never or not anymore 70 (48.3%)

Some of the time and/or in some positions 64 (44.1%)

Always 1 (.7%)

Other 10 (6.9%)

Chart of responses to How many staff members are at your organization? Responses detailed in text that follows image

How many staff members are at your organization?

143 responses

11-50 56 (39.2%)

51-100 24 (16.8%)

101-200 24 (16.8%)

201+ 18 (12.6%)

0-10 16 (11.2%)

Other 5 (3.4%)


That’s it for now!

As I say above, I really welcome your comments and feedback.

I would also be very grateful if you could help spread the call for survey responses, especially to folks who do hiring in special libraries, archives, and for non-library LIS workers. If you have contacts in those areas, will you please help spread the word? People who do hiring can fill out the survey here.

Oh also – if you like this kind of thing you might be interested in this effort to collect information about academic job negotiations. Check it out!

Your Pal,

Emily

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Stats and Graphs: State of the Library Job Market

It’s Staturday!

It’s time for our annualish check-in with our surveys.  This week: What’s the JOB market like nowadays?

Last time we checked in, 204 people who hire librarians had responded to our State of the Library Job Market Survey.  Now we’re up to 267! (It’s still open, so if you’ve hired at least one librarian and want to add your voice, please visit: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey )

And now, here are the

Results!

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

 how many applied
25 or fewer    116    44.1%
25-75    98    37.3%
75-100    24    9.1%
more than 100, but less than 200    16    6.1%
more than 200    4    1.5%
Other    5    1.9%

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

 pct hirable
25% or less 164 62.6%
26-50% 55 21.0%
51-75% 15 5.7%
more than 75% 12 4.6%
other 16 6.1%

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

 feedback
Yes    21    8%
No    161    61.2%
Other    81    30.8%

The Workplace

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

 number of EEs
0-10    45    17%
10-50    109    41.1%
50-100    40    15.1%
100-200    36    13.6%
200+    35    13.2%

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

 FT lib
1    58    22.1%
2    61    23.2%
3-4    53    20.2%
5-6    32    12.2%
7 or more    27    10.3%
Other    32    12.2%

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

 FT parapro
1    41    16%
2    39    15.2%
3-4    53    20.6%
5-6    29    11.3%
7 or more    40    15.6%
Other    55    21.4%

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

 num of positions change
There are more positions    90    34.2%
There are fewer positions    94    35.7%
There are the same number of positions    56    21.3%
I don’t know    15    5.7%
Other    8    3%

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

 replace PT
Yes    73    27.7%
No    167    63.3%
I don’t know    16    6.1%
Other    8    3%

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

 replace para
Yes    73    27.7%
No    167    63.3%
I don’t know    16    6.1%
Other    8    3%

Is librarianship a dying profession?

 dying profession
Yes    76    28.9%
No    165    62.7%
I don’t know    15    5.7%
Other    7    2.7%

Demographics

Where are you?

region
Northeastern US    54    20.5%
Midwestern US    66    25%
Southern US    70    26.5%
Western US    60    22.7%
Canada    5    1.9%
UK    1    0.4%
Australia/New Zealand    0    0%
Other    8    3%

Where are you?

urban
Urban area    107    40.4%
Suburban area    97    36.6%
Rural area    51    19.2%
Other    10    3.8%

What type of institution do you hire for?

lib type
Academic Library    144    55.4%
Public Library    99    38.1%
School Library    1    0.4%
Special Library    4    1.5%
Archives    1    0.4%
Other    11    4.2%

Are you a librarian?

r u lib
Yes 189 93%
No 3 1%
It’s complicated 9 4%

Are you now or have you ever been:

hiring role
A hiring manager    214    81.7%
A member of a hiring or search committee    233    88.9%
Human resources    14    5.3%
Other    7    2.7%

Would you like to have information about you or your organization shared ?

anonymous
No, I prefer to remain anonymous    229    86.7%
Yes, and I’ll give you my email address on the next page    35    13.3%

I also have a post about the answer to I want to hire someone who is: here

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Stats and Graphs: 576 Job hunters

It’s Staturday!

It’s time for our annualish check-in with our surveys.  This week: the survey with the most respondents, which I affectionately call Job Hunter’s Revenge.

Last time we checked in, we had 543 responses.  Now we’ve got 576!  

Results!

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

salary


Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not 223    38.8%
Only for certain kinds of employers 80    13.9%
No (even if I might think it *should* be) 202    35.1%
Other 63    11%

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

liars

Yes              59         10.3%
No             446         77.6%
Other               60         10.4%

When would you like employers to contact you?

when to communicate


To acknowledge my application    429    74.9%
To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage    519    90.6%
To follow-up after an interview    373    65.1%
Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me    511    89.2%
Other    69    12%

People may select more than one checkbox, so percentages may add up to more than 100%.

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

communication method


Phone    47    8.2%
Email    245    42.6%
Mail    1    0.2%
Phone for good news, email for bad news    238    41.4%
Other    39    6.8%

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

important events


Tour of facility    394    70%
Being taken out to meal    18    3.2%
Meeting department members/potential co-workers    521    92.5%
Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary    217    38.5%
Being able to present    73    13%
Other    127    22.6%

People may select more than one checkbox, so percentages may add up to more than 100%.

Demographics

Are you currently employed, even if part time or in an unrelated field?

currently employed
Yes    464    80.7%
No    108    18.8%

Have you been hired in the last two months, even if part time or in an unrelated field?

hired last 2 mos

Yes    128    22.3%
No    438    76.2%

How long have you been job hunting (or if recently hired, how long did you look before that)?

length of search


Less than six months    184    32%
Six months to a year    156    27.1%
A year to 18 months    83    14.4%
More than 18 months    147    25.6%

What type(s) of organization are you looking in?

org type

Academic library    468    82.1%
Archives    196    34.4%
Library vendor/service provider    163    28.6%
Public library    382    67%
School library    92    16.1%
Special library    311    54.6%
Other    132    23.2%

People may select more than one checkbox, so percentages may add up to more than 100%.

What position level are you looking for?

pos level

Entry level    382    67%
Requiring at least two years of experience    349    61.2%
Supervisory    150    26.3%
Department Head    81    14.2%
Senior Librarian    86    15.1%
Branch Manager    60    10.5%
Director/Dean    35    6.1%
Other    52    9.1%

People may select more than one checkbox, so percentages may add up to more than 100%.

Where are you?

where 1


Australia/New Zealand    0    0%
Canada    22    3.8%
Midwestern US    150    26.1%
Northeastern US    170    29.6%
Southern US    104    18.1%
UK    1    0.2%
Western US    110    19.1%
Other    17    3%

Where are you?

where 2


Urban area    217    37.7%
City/Town    177    30.8%
Suburban area    116    20.2%
Rural area    54    9.4%
Other    9    1.6%

Are you willing/able to move for employment?

willing to move


No    155    27%
Yes, anywhere    209    36.4%
Other    204    35.5%

Would you like to include a short bio with your answers?

org type


No    439    76.3%
Yes    113    19.7%
Other    18    3.1%
This survey was co-written by Naomi House, of I Need A Library Job.  If you’re job hunting, INALJ is a wealth of information and it has job ads up the wazoo.  

Also if you’re job hunting, and haven’t taken the survey yet, please do!  If you’ve got friends, please share the link:

http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

Finally, if you have questions, comments or concerns, we’d love to hear them.

You can either comment below, or email hiringlibrariansATgmail.

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Stats and Graphs

Stats and Graphs: State of the Library Job Market

It’s Staturday!

204 people who hire librarians have responded to our new State of the Library Job Market Survey.  It’s still open, so if you’ve hired at least one librarian and want to add your voice, please visit: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey

And now, here are the

Results!

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

25 or fewer 86 42%
25-75 74 36%
75-100 20 10%
more than 100, but less than 200 15 7%
more than 200 2 1%
Other 5 2%

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

 hirable
25% or less 130 64%
26-50% 41 20%
51-75% 10 5%
more than 75% 6 6%
Other 15 7%

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

Yes 17 8%
No 123 60%
Other 61 30%

The Workplace

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

0-10 33 16%
10-50 80 39%
50-100 32 16%
100-200 30 15%
200+ 27 13%

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

1 43 21%
2 44 22%
3-4 38 19%
5-6 29 14%
7 or more 22 11%
Other 26 13%

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

1 29 14%
2 29 14%
3-4 39 19%
5-6 23 11%
7 or more 33 16%
Other 43 21%

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

There are more positions 73 36%
There are fewer positions 67 33%
There are the same number of positions 41 20%
I don’t know 13 6%
Other 6 3%

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

Yes 53 26%
No 126 62%
I don’t know 14 7%
Other 8 4%

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

Yes 53 26%
No 128 63%
I don’t know 14 7%
Other 6 3%

Is librarianship a dying profession?

Yes 9 4%
No 151 74%
I don’t know 16 8%
Other 24 12%

Demographics

Where are you?

Northeastern US 39 19%
Midwestern US 48 24%
Southern US 53 26%
Western US 51 25%
Canada 4 2%
UK 1 0%
Australia/New Zealand 0 0%
Other 5 2%

Where are you?

Urban area 80 39%
Suburban area 78 38%
Rural area 38 19%
Other 6 3%

What type of institution do you hire for?

Academic Library 106 52%
Public Library 78 38%
School Library 1 0%
Special Library 4 2%
Archives 1 0%
Other 9 4%

Are you a librarian?

Yes 189 93%
No 3 1%
It’s complicated 9 4%

Are you now or have you ever been:

A hiring manager 167 82%
A member of a hiring or search committee 181 89%
Human resources 11 5%
Other 6 3%

Would you like to have information about you or your organization shared ?

No, I prefer to remain anonymous 178 87%
Yes, and I’ll give you my email address on the next page 24 12

We’ll post the first full response tomorrow.   You’ll see longer answers to questions such as:

And how would you define “hirable”?

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

I want to hire someone who is ___________.

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Is librarianship a dying profession? Why or why not?

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Stats and Graphs: Them’s Hiring Words

Didja see that there’s a new survey?

This week we launched a State of the Job Market survey. It asks people who hire librarians, and other LIS workers, to tell us things like the number of people who applied to their last job opening, why candidates are eliminated at the application stage, and if the number of full time librarian positions has increased or decreased over the last decade.

We’ve had about 140 respondents. I’m hoping to get a few more before posting the initial statistics. If you hire LIS workers, please take the survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey If you know someone who hires LIS workers, please pass on the link.

In the meantime, here is a little peek at the responses to a question that asks hiring librarians to finish a sentence.

I want to hire someone who is:
WordItOut-word-cloud-646763

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