Tag Archives: Archive

Job Hunters’ Web Guide Guide

We’ve been featuring different websites for LIS job hunters for a while now, and here is our list.  You can always access the full feed of profiles by going to the Archives page and choosing the category Job Hunters Web Guide (or just click that link).  While you’re on the Archives page, you may want to take a look at the other categories, which include things like library type or feature title.

So, in alphabetical order, here are the websites we’ve featured since starting with INALJ on December 6, 2012.  The links go to the full profile, which will link you to the website (just click on the screenshot).

Academic Library Jobs:  Job posting website, targeted on Academic libraries

ACRL Residency Interest Group: Job listings and information for people interested in getting a residency position, and for those offering them.  Excellent opportunity for networking and information straight from the source.

Archives Gig: Job postings for archivists.

Career Q & A with the Library Career People: Submit your questions about careers and job hunting, and read answers to what others have asked.

Careers in Federal Libraries: Your guide to being the POTUS’ Librarian.  And other Federal library positions.

Careers in Law Librarianship: Everything you ever wanted to know about being a law librarian, from the American Association of Law Librarians

I Need a Library Job: Comprehensive job postings for all kinds of LIS careers.  Also blogs by over 50 different editors on different aspects of library job hunting and careers.

Infonista: Information about non-traditional LIS careers (and traditional ones too).

Librarian Hire Fashion: Crowdsourcing advice on what to wear to library interviews, by posing questions and curating submissions from users of their interview outfits.

Library Association of Ireland’s Career Development Group: Career links, research, and events from the LAI.

The Library Career Centre: Career coaching from recruiter Nicola Franklin

LibraryJobline: The Colorado Library Association posts jobs and resources, and collects statistics about library jobs, making the data freely available.

Library Job Postings on the Internet: Index of library employment sites – over 400,  from all around the world.

LisList: US lis jobs, in one big list.

METRO Jobbank/Career Resources: From the Metropolitan New York Library Council (managed by the extraordinary Ellen Mehling), job listings and articles on library careers.  METRO also hosts workshops for job hunters.

Library Jobs.ie: Want to work in Ireland?  Irish library job postings, as well as LIS-related job opportunities.

MLA Deal:  The Maryland Library Association’s website for new professionals and library students.

Open Cover Letters: Real cover letters that got people library jobs

What are we missing?  Tell us about your favorite library job site in the comments!

Guides Alma Wegen and Fairman B. Lee with a climbing party on Nisqually Glacier, Mount Rainier National Park

Finally, it’s time for your monthly reminder about the Interview Questions Repository.  Follow this link to submit questions you were asked in your recent library interview, or follow this one to prep for your upcoming interview by taking a look at what others have added.  These links are always available in the sidebar to your right.  Top tip: use the List View feature to limit to just the answer categories you are interested in. As of 07/11/2013, there are 156 lines of submitted questions.

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Filed under Job Hunters Web Guide, News and Administration

Go to professional meetings and see who’s there

October 28, 1902 via National Library of Ireland on the CommonsThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for More than 18 months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, Library vendors/service providers, Public libraries, Special libraries, and

anyplace that will hire me

at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience. Here is how this person describes his or her experience with internships/volunteering:

I had a archives internship and two graduate assistantships, one in archives one as a reference librarian before I graduated. Since then I volunteered for my local archives for 4 years, held about 5 temp positions in archives and worked for my local library part-time for about 4 years. I have become a certified archivist though my volunteer work.

This job hunter is in an urban area in the Northeastern US and is not willing to move.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Someplace in the New York Metro area
With Decent pay, if it’s in NYC I would have to take a train in and that would need to cover it.
A place with a possibility of growth

Where do you look for open positions?

Professional Listservs, LinkedIn, INAJ, Archives Gig, METRO job bank, NY ART job bank

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I usually spent about an hour on it. I read the job posting and try to use the words in the posting in my cover letter. Sometimes I might see if I can find where the job is located and maybe some background on who works there. I used to address my cover letter to the director but recently I favor using Hiring Manger instead. Seems less stalker like.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

No

When would you like employers to contact you?

To acknowledge my application
To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
To follow-up after an interview
Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

I think they should put the salary in the posting and decent one at that. They should talk about the probability of growth in the company. They might want to express their involvement in local professional organizations or conferences. Go to professional meetings and see who’s there. The people who go there already on their own dime are the people you want to work for you.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Keep in contact with the candidates. I wish they would be more upfront with your possibility of employment there. One place flat out told me they were legally obligated to interview anyone who showed interest in the position and that I probably wouldn’t be a good fit for what they were looking for. Yeah it was painful in the short term but I also wasn’t sitting by the phone waiting for them.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I have no idea, if I did I think I would be hired by now. That said I think research on the subject of the work you’re doing, and being personable helps.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

I would add a question of what a job seeker learned since she/he started his search. I’m not the same person I was when I first started my search and I’ve become much wiser.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Urban area

You are What is Being Hired, Not the Paper Degree, Not the Fancy Outfits

DylaneFinkFaceDylane Fink is an MLIS grad student at Wayne State University, expecting to finish in summer 2013. Her very first job was as a library page, and she says:

after being teased that I would come back to run the library (and always brushing it off) I realized that the library field was the one for me

Ms. Fink is currently an assistant in a school library and hopes to continue working as a teacher librarian in some capacity. She has been looking for a new position for six months to a year, in Public libraries, School libraries, and Special libraries, for positions at the entry level, requiring at least two years of experience, and above entry level but below management. Here is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

In addition to about 9 years of paid library experience I interned at a local college library as part of my undergraduate program.
I worked with the archives department helping to compile data needed for a proposal. The library is looking to digitize a large portion of their archives and needed extensive data on the physical state of their pieces.
I also researched a fascinating topic from the early years of the school while going through the archive pieces.

Ms. Fink is in a rural area of the Northeastern US, and is willing to move anywhere. Her webpage is a work in progress but please feel free to take a look around: http://dylanefink.weebly.com/

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Relevance to interests/passions.

Potential for longevity.

Location of the job/library.

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist

LITA

Local county library postings

Several state Library Association Joblines

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Generally I read and reread the description and requirements to decide if I have what it takes to be a candidate. I look over my resume to beef up or take away things that wouldn’t be relevant to the particular position.

Filling out the actual application tends to be tedious however some time is spent ensuring that all phone numbers, contact points and references are accurate. The cover letter is where I spend the majority of my time and effort to really give potential employers an understanding of who I am and why I would be an asset to the company.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: I am always honest with job descriptions, information, time spent, education, etc. however I may enhance a position title to better fit the job I did..for example my current position has me as an “instructional assistant” however I tend to think “Media Center Assistant” better summarizes my actual position.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

√ To follow-up after an interview

√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

√ Other: being given a true description of the position, perhaps by someone currently in the role

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be upfront and honest about the depth of responsibility in the job and what assets they are looking for in a candidate. Reach out to those who may have less education but extensive experience.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

The wait is what hurts the most, waiting to hear if you are offered an interview, waiting to hear if they want an additional interview or if you have been selected. Finding a way to expedite the process would be appreciated.

 I know this is not always possible as many positions are filled by county policy/governing body guidelines and timetables.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Be yourself and be confident in what you are selling. You are what is being hired, not the paper degree, not the fancy outfits. Show employers what you can bring to the table and how you can be a vital member of their company. Make them want you, your ideas and your plans.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Rural area

Opportunity to Contribute

Adriana MaynardAdriana Maynard is an April 2012 graduate of the University of Michigan School of Information, specializing in Archives and Preservation of Information.  She has interned with the General Motors Design Archive and the Theodore Roosevelt Center, working in digitization, content management, and digital cataloging.  Her job search is ongoing, with a focus on university archives and local history organizations. She has been job hunting for six months to a year, looking for entry level positions. Here is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

I have covered a range of archival functions through multiple internships and volunteering opportunities.  I digitized photographs and created metadata for a corporate archive and a local historical society; worked in original digital cataloging for a new digital archiving initiative; and volunteered with processing, finding aid creation, and metadata for cultural libraries.

Ms. Maynard is in a city/town in the Southern US, and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Stability, opportunity to contribute, a living wage

Where do you look for open positions?

I have over 40 sites that I check somewhat regularly, including state library websites, historical societies, SAA, SLA, and museums resources, among other major library sites.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

 Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

 When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Provide the most complete information possible about the position, including salary.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Acknowledge the applicant through every stage of the process, especially upon receipt of the application and when the position has been filled by another candidate.  If there is already an internal candidate in mind for the position, say so in the listing to save everyone a bit of heartache.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I wish I knew.  It seems to be some magical combination of experience, personality, and knowing the right person.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

I’d like to hear more about people’s experiences after receiving an interview; where did they fall short in the process, what are organizations looking for that we as job seekers aren’t providing, how can we move through the process to obtain a position?  Thank you for posting this survey; I’ve seen very few resources like this that actually interact with job seekers to understand how tough the market is.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under City/town, Job hunter's survey, Southern US