Tag Archives: Career development

Library School Career Center: University of Washington

Here is this week’s installment of the Library School Career Center feature, which is presented in partnership with the folks from the blog Hack Library School.  If you’re interested in library education, or in new ideas and the future of the profession, you should check it out.  


This interview is with Janet Matta, who is the Career Services Advisor for the Information School at the University of Washington, serving the career development of 850 iSchool students in four academic programs. Prior to her joining the University of Washington Information School, Janet was a Career Counselor at the University of Washington – Bothell, provided career support to high school students at a small nonprofit, Bainbridge Youth Services, and did her Career Counseling Internship with the University of Washington Evans School of Public Affairs. She has a Masters of Education from Seattle University and an undergraduate degree in History from Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada. In addition to her career counseling experience, Janet spent 6 years in environmental consulting for oil spill response, and gets excited about environmental science. Her diverse background means she’s great at connecting students to ideas and resources in a wide range of professional disciplines. Janet is deeply passionate about helping students find and create unique careers that are a perfect match for their interests and strengths, and loves teaching career skills like networking, interviewing, and salary negotiation to students. Learn more about Janet at www.linkedin.com/in/janetmatta/

Career Center Information

Who staffs the career center?  Please talk a little about how it is managed and run.

Janet is the Career Services Advisor for the iSchool, which includes the Masters of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program. Her office is in the Office of Student Services for the Information School which includes academic advisors, the admissions advisor, and support staff.

Are there “career experts” on staff?  What are their credentials?

Janet has 3 years of experience in career advising and over 10 years of experience in training and education of adults and youth. She has an M.Ed. in Student Development Administration, and spends every free moment possible staying up to date on hiring trends and techniques to help students succeed in their future jobs.

Does the career center provide any of the following:

√  Job Listings                   √ Resume/CV Review                    √ Help writing cover letters
√ Literature/articles          √ Interview Practice                       √ General career coaching
√ Networking events

Do you provide in-person services?

√ Appointments        √  Speakers, or programs that present experts
√ Mixers or other networking events          √ Job Fairs
√ Drop-in career center:  Set drop-in hours each quarter, and students routinely pop in when my office door is open.

Do you provide online services?

√ Website with resources   √ Blog: updated 1x per week
√ Facebook: updates to student group pages and the Office of Student Services Facebook page                              √ Newsletter: published online at http://ischooloss.wordpress.com/
√ Other: online and phone advising appointments to distance students, a jobs and internships database just for iSchool students and alumni.

What do you think is the best way for students to use the career center?

I augment the resources available through the main UW Career Center, so I recommend that students visit and bookmark the content on the UW Career Center website, or visit with Career Center professionals for resume/cover letter reviews, and then to schedule an appointment with me if they want more specialized support! Attend workshops and employer information sessions to learn about common topics and to network with professionals. The more you attend that will help you network with professionals across a variety of industries and sectors the better, and not just with traditional libraries!

May alumni use career center resources?

Alumni can use our job and internships database, called iCareers, and can utilize web resources and the resources available through the UW Career Center.

Are there any charges for services?

Nope!

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using the career center?

I have received a few thank you notes from students who credit their appointment with career services to increasing their confidence and helping them generate ideas and contacts that have led to internships or full time jobs. It makes me so happy to know that our services are helpful to students!

Anything else you’d like to share with readers about your services in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

I advocate creativity in the job search and career development process! I ask students to think about their values and what they want to be doing every day, and then to think creatively about all the different environments and organizations that might benefit from their skill set that an MLIS and their other professional backgrounds provide. In a market that’s tough for libraries, our students are active and successful in a variety of corporate, nonprofit, or government settings in addition to traditional library environments.

Students’ Career Paths

Can you share any statistics about employment rates after graduation?

We unfortunately have never had a response rate of over 51%  to surveys of our graduates, so we don’t currently have very accurate data on employment rates after graduation.

Can you talk a little bit about the school’s approach to internships, practicums and/or volunteering?

Internships for our MLIS students are highly encouraged! The more experience a student has the better, and internships can lead to great contacts and skills that will help you land a job later. I advocate that students take on as much internship or independent experience as they can to bolster their experience, their network of contacts, and their resume. Students work with me to find great internship options, and with their academic advisor to figure out how to get credit.

Does the school have a stated approach or policy on helping students to find careers?

The mission of iSchool Career Services is:

Mission Statement

We make information work for your career. The iSchool Career Adviser offers information on job search skills, advising on career development, and connections to resources and employers tailored to the information field. We help you to stand out and be noticed no matter where you are in your professional career.

Commitment to Students

Our first responsibility is to connect the student experience at the iSchool to the professional goals of our students.  We focus on the information profession and refer students to the UW Career Center for other general career counseling and workshops.

Commitment to Employers

Our students are highly qualified to fill roles as information professionals in a variety of organizations. We facilitate job recruitment through a fair and equitable process that is driven by the needs of our students. The iSchool supports and abides by theNational Association of Colleges and Employers Principles for Professional Practice.

Are there any notable graduates?

Too many to count!

Demographics

How many students in the library school?

Approximately 400

What degree(s) do you offer?

MLIS

Is it ALA accredited?

Yes

What are the entrance requirements?

  • Bachelors degree* or higher in any discipline (must be equivalent to a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution)

  • Grade point average of 3.0 or higher (exceptions considered on a case by case basis)

  • Law MLIS program applicants must have:

○     JD from a law school within the US

When was the library school founded?

1911

Where are you?

√ Western US

Where are you?

√ Urban area

Anything else you’d like to share that’s unique about the school?

We’re so lucky to be in Seattle, it’s beautiful here!


Brianna Marshall

This interview was conducted by Brianna Marshall, who is a second year dual-degree Master of Library Science and Master of Information Science student at Indiana University’s School of Library and Information Science. She is Managing Editor for Hack Library School and a 2012-2013 HASTAC scholar. Learn more about Brianna through her blog and portfolio or by following her on Twitter @notsosternlib

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Library School Career Center: LIU Palmer

Here is this week’s installment of the Library School Career Center feature, which is presented in partnership with the folks from the blog Hack Library School.  If you’re interested in library education, or in new ideas and the future of the profession, you should check it out.  


LIU Palmer 3

This interview is with Ellen Mehling, Director, Westchester Program and Internships, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, LIU Post.

Career Center Information

LIU Palmer 2

Who staffs the career center?

Career services (job hunting and career development) are provided by me [Ellen Mehling] for the Palmer School’s students and alumni. There is not an actual physical center; services are provided in various ways, online and face-to-face, one-on-one and in groups, for all Palmer School locations.

Are there “career experts” on staff? What are their credentials?

I’ve been an advisor on job hunting and career development for various groups including librarians/information professionals and library school students, for about eight years. I started in a former job, advising members of the general public and special populations who were seeking employment, and before long was being asked to teach workshops on the job search to other library professionals. In addition to my work at the Palmer School, I am Job Bank Manager and Career Development Consultant for the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO).

I’ve trained other librarians on assisting job hunting patrons, and have taught classes/workshops, moderated or spoken on panel discussions and conducted mock interviews and more, at various venues. I write regularly on job hunting/career topics for various sites, including METRO’s. I’ve served on hiring committees and have been a successful applicant myself in recent years too, so I’ve seen and experienced first-hand what works and what doesn’t.

Does the career center provide any of the following:

√ Resume/CV Review   √ Advice on writing cover letters
√  Interview Practice [mock interview]
√ General career advising
√  Other: Career Q&A on blog, webinars presentations/workshops (given by me), joint or guest presentations/workshops, recruiter visits, panel discussions, and full-day job hunting/career events. Some of these are open to students and graduates from other schools. I visit each of the Internship classes each semester to discuss resume writing. Palmer School students and alumni are also encouraged to make use of LIU’s Career Services in addition to the industry-specific career services provided by the School.

Do you provide in-person services?

√ Appointments
√ Speakers, or programs that present experts

Do you provide online services?

Website with resources    √  Blog   √ Webinars
√ Twitter: @LIUPalmerSchool
LinkedIn     √ Facebook
√ Other: Career / Job Hunting Q&A, “Kiosk” student listserv (anyone can subscribe to the listserv)

What do you think is the best way for students to use the career center?

Palmer School students and alumni contact me directly. Anyone can access the information on the blog and/or join the listserv or follow on Twitter, etc.

May alumni use career center resources?

Yes.

Are there any charges for services?

There is no charge.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using the career center?

We are always delighted to hear that our graduates have found positions. Three recent hires among our alumni: Library Media Specialist in the Elmont School District, Archives Technician at the National Archives at New York City, and Archives Coordinator for NY at Cartier.

Anything else you’d like to share with readers about your services in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

The job market is improving, but competition is still very strong, with many well-qualified applicants for each open position. Relevant skills and experience are necessary in addition to the degree, as are a strong network, patience, and a positive attitude. Students should start networking while they are still in school, and begin their job search before graduation.

LIU Palmer 1 March 5

Students’ Career Paths

Can you talk a little bit about the school’s approach to internships, practicums and/or volunteering?

A 120-hour internship is required for the Master’s degree students. It is usually done in the final semester. This benefits the students in a number of ways, including giving them experience to put on their resumes, and providing networking opportunities, both of which are crucial to job-hunting success. Students are encouraged throughout the program to get as much experience as they can, however they can, including volunteering, part-time jobs, project work etc.

Are there any notable graduates?

Bonnie Sauer at the National Archives at New York City
Caitlin McGurk at the Center for Cartoon Studies

LIU Palmer 4 March 5

Demographics

How many students in the library school?

Approximately 325.

What degree(s) do you offer?

MS in Library and Information Science
MS in Library and Information Science – School Library Media
PhD in Information Studies

Is it ALA accredited?

Yes.

What are the entrance requirements?

http://www.liu.edu/CWPost/Academics/Schools/CEIS/PSLIS/Graduate-Programs/MS-LIS/AdmisReq

When was the library school founded?

The Palmer School of Library and Information Science was established in 1959 on the LIU Post Campus of Long Island University. The Master of Science in Library Science was first accredited by the American Library Association in 1971. In 1992, the M.S. in Library Science was merged with the M.S. in Information Science and subsequently the name of the degree was changed to the M.S. in
Library and Information Science.

In 1995, the School began to offer the full accredited M.S. in Library and Information Science in Manhattan, and in 1997, the first class of students was admitted for the Doctor of Philosophy in Information Studies program.

Where are you?

√ Northeastern US

Where are you?

√ Urban area (NYC)
√ Suburban area (Long Island)

Anything else you’d like to share that’s unique about the school?

The Palmer School of Library and Information Science is one of the most distinguished schools of library and information science in the country. With three program locations throughout the New York metropolitan area as well as online and blended courses, the Palmer School offers a broad portfolio of degree and advanced certificate programs taught by a faculty of distinguished scholars, researchers and hands-on practitioners. We prepare our students for careers for a digital world and help them skillfully harness the way information is preserved, valued and delivered to every facet of society.

Aside from the internship requirement, the Palmer School is known for personalized one-on-one advisement and support throughout the time students are in the program. This continues even beyond graduation with the services available to alumni. The three campuses are LIU Post and LIU Brentwood on Long Island and in Manhattan at NYU’s Bobst Library. There is also a Dual Degree (Master’s) program, offered at the Manhattan location.


Brianna Marshall

This interview was conducted by Brianna Marshall, who is a second year dual-degree Master of Library Science and Master of Information Science student at Indiana University’s School of Library and Information Science. She is Managing Editor for Hack Library School and a 2012-2013 HASTAC scholar. Learn more about Brianna through her blog and portfolio or by following her on Twitter @notsosternlib

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Filed under City/town, Library School Career Center, MLIS Students, Northeastern US, Urban area

Job Hunter’s Web Guide: Infonista

Tired of getting kicked around by libraries? Are you intrigued by the myriad of possibilities for using your degree? Want an alternative LIS career?  Today we are featuring the site for you!  Kim Dority was kind enough to talk to us about her blog, Infonista.


Infonista

What is it? Please give us your elevator speech!

Infonista is a blog that focuses on all the different ways LIS professionals can deploy their information skills, in both traditional and nontraditional environments. In addition, I try to bring in information from outside the profession that may be relevant to building a resilient LIS career.

When was it started? Why was it started?

It was started in June 2010 as a way to extend the reach of a course I’d been teaching in the University of Denver MLIS program – I wanted more students (and LIS practitioners) to understand how incredibly valuable their skill sets could be if they took a broader approach to information work.

Who runs it?

I (Kim Dority) run it, but I have to admit (with embarrassment) that I’ve been somewhat neglectful of my blog recently due to other commitments, e.g., creating and managing the LinkedIn LIS Career Options group and finishing off a recently published book, LIS Career Sourcebook: Managing and Maximizing Every Step of Your Career (Libraries Unlimited, 2013). My goal for this year is to be a much more diligent blogger!

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I don’t necessarily consider myself a “career expert,” but more of someone who’s done nearly every type of LIS work in her career and who has researched and taught courses, webinars, and workshops on this topic for 13 years. During that time I’ve had the extreme good fortune to learn from hundreds of colleagues, students, friends, and even mentors, so I consider myself more of a conduit for and aggregator of all the stuff we’re learning from each other.

Who is your target audience?

LIS students and professionals, especially those trying to explore or navigate into broader career opportunities that will use their information skills.

What’s the best way to use your site? Should users consult it daily? Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

I’d say noodle around. All of the posts are tagged by a specific category, so if users are interested in a specific topic, they should be able find all the posts on that topic. My goal is to post weekly, although as I mentioned, that’s currently aspirational rather than reality!

Does your site provide:

Interviews   Answers to reader questions
Articles/literature    Links
Research   Coaching
The opportunity for interaction

Advice on:
Networking

Other: emerging types of LIS career paths and how to explore/position for them

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats?

Book(s): Rethinking Information Work (Libraries Unlimited, 2006), LIS Career Sourcebook (Libraries Unlimited, 2012)
 Other: LIS career webinars and workshops for MLIS programs and LIS associations, divisions, and chapters

Do you charge for anything on your site?

No

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

I’ve actually never tracked this information so have no idea!

meredith loweAnything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

Hmmm…. I think I’d encourage your readers to think as broadly and creatively about the application of their LIS skills as possible in order to find jobs, and then continue to keep an eye out for “alternative uses” even after landing those jobs. Given this economy, I believe it’s really important to operate as if we’re all self-employed, regardless of where we happen to be working at any given point in our careers. My goal is to help LIS students and professional create resilient careers, which often means rethinking what we do, how we do it, and who we do it for.

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Filed under Job Hunters Web Guide, MLIS Students, Other Organization or Library Type

Library School Career Center: Drexel University iSchool

Here is this week’s installment of the Library School Career Center feature, which is presented in partnership with the folks from the blog Hack Library School.  If you’re interested in library education, or in new ideas and the future of the profession, you should check it out.  


Jennifer Lally

 

This interview is with Jennifer Lally, Event & Career Services Manager, Drexel University, The iSchool, College of Information Science & Technology. Jennifer Lally plans all the events for the college and manages a jobs page on the iSchool’s website, where she posts weekly full-time and part-time jobs that pertain to iSchool students.  Jennifer works with employers interested in hiring iSchool students, by setting up information sessions, webinars and field trips.  She also works with student groups helping them plan events.

Career Center Information

Who staffs the career center?  Please talk a little about how it is managed and run.

We do not have a “career center” per se; I am the only person in the iSchool’s office that deals with career services.  Drexel University as a whole has the Steinbright Career Development Center (SCDC) where career services are offered to ALL Drexel students.  Each college is assigned someone from the SCDC to work with our students.  The iSchool at Drexel’s key feature is the job board we keep where any jobs received are sent to an email address where they are then opened and posted onto our website.  If students have career services questions, they stop in, call or email me.  I field the questions they have and decide which department they should speak to.  I am basically the liaison to all career services questions, I field the questions and then send them to the appropriate department/person.

We want the students to understand the resources we have available so we include a few career services slides in our mandatory online/on-campus orientation presentation in the beginning of each quarter.  We have a weekly e-newsletter, “The iSchool Weekly Digest” where announcements are sent out every Tuesday and we also have an announcements section in Blackboard Learn where I can post upcoming information sessions, networking events, internships, etc.  We have Graduate Peer Mentors who are available to speak to prospective and new library science students.  The Alumni Association also manages an Alumni Peer Mentoring Program, so students can sign up and find a mentor.  Students may schedule appointments with Ken Bohrer, Graduate co-op coordinator at the SCDC to talk about career questions, resume and cover letter review.  I also help the student chapters advertise the events they plan, which consist of information sessions, field trips, webinars, tours, networking events, resume review events.

Are there “career experts” on staff?  What are their credentials?

We have faculty mentors and we list on our website their specialty areas so students can contact them with questions.

Does the career center provide any of the following:

(If I do not directly provide this service, a department on campus does)

√ Job Listings   √ Resume/CV Review   √ Help writing cover letters
√ Literature/articles   √ Interview Practice   √ General career coaching
√ Networking events (virtual or in-person)
√ Other: We participate and help promote events sponsored by the student groups of professional library associations.

Do you provide in-person services?

√ Appointments (Ken Bohrer does at the SCDC)
√ Speakers, or programs that present experts
√ Mixers or other networking events
√ Job Fairs (*The SCDC hosts 2 big career fairs a year one in October and one in April and I have an event every year after the October career fair inviting all employers who hire iSchool students and invite them to a private reception where students can speak to them one on one.)
√ Drop-in career center:  Students can stop in anytime from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm

Do you provide online services?

(If I do not personally do it, the Marketing team promotes on Facebook and Twitter; The student groups have webcasted events, I advertise in the e-newsletter)
√ Website with resources
√ Webinars   √ Podcasts   √ Twitter: @ischoolatDrexel
√ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ischoolatdrexel   √ Newsletter
√ Other: Blackboard announcements section.

What do you think is the best way for students to use the career center?

To read the weekly e-newsletter that goes out every week, to join a student group and keep an eye on the iSchools job board.

May alumni use career center resources?

Yes, the jobs website is open to the public, so anyone can view it.  They can also contact the Career Services Office in the Department of Alumni Relations.

Are there any charges for services?  

No

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using the career center?

Students that pay attention to the announcements and job board and become involved in the student groups are more likely to get an internship and gain the experience they need to get a job after graduation.

Anything else you’d like to share with readers about your services in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

No

iSchool Alumni GardenDrexel iSchool: Bridge MagazineApril 25, 2011

Students’ Career Paths

Can you share any statistics about employment rates after graduation?

Library Journal 2012 Placements & Salaries results.

Can you talk a little bit about the school’s approach to internships, practicums and/or volunteering?  

We post all internships, practicums and volunteer projects on our job board and will highlight specific ones in our weekly e-newsletter.  We encourage students to take the practicum after they have 24 credits to help build their job portfolio and to become involved if they do not have any prior library experiences.

Does the school have a stated approach or policy on helping students to find careers?

No

Does the school have any relationships with organizations that offer fellowships or other post-graduate opportunities?

Yes, we received announcements like these from faculty members and staff on the student services team.

Rush Building at Night

Demographics

How many students in the library school?

We have 470 students currently enrolled in the library science program this winter quarter.

What degree(s) do you offer?

www.ischool.drexel.edu/PS/GraduatePrograms

Is it ALA accredited?

Yes

What are the entrance requirements?

www.ischool.drexel.edu/PS/GraduatePrograms/Admissions

When was the library school founded?

1892

Where are you?

√ Northeastern US

Where are you?

√ City/town


Brianna Marshall

This interview was conducted by Brianna Marshall is a second year dual-degree Master of Library Science and Master of Information Science student at Indiana University’s School of Library and Information Science. She is Managing Editor for Hack Library School and a 2012-2013 HASTAC scholar. Learn more about Brianna through her blog and portfolio or by following her on Twitter @notsosternlib

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Filed under City/town, Library School Career Center, MLIS Students, Northeastern US, Web/Computer Services

Job Hunter’s Web Guide: Careers in Law Librarianship

I’m happy to be able to share today’s site with you. It is an excellent example of the services our professional associations can provide for job hunters and prospective librarians. Today we are featuring Careers in Law Librarianship, a site run by the American Association of Law Librarians (AALL). Wendy E. Moore, who is the Chair of the AALL Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee as well as the Acquisitions Librarian, University of Georgia Law Library, was gracious enough to answer my questions. I hope you will enjoy!


Careers in Law Librarianship

What is it? Please give us your elevator speech!

Careers in Law Librarianship is a portal to link people interested in law librarianship with information about educational requirements, career possibilities, types of law libraries, and sources of financial assistance.

When was it started? Why was it started?

It started about five years ago or so. It was created to have a single source to share with people interested in law librarianship which would be easy to find using a search engine.

Who runs it?

The site is run by the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL), an organization with over 5,000 members, which was founded in 1906 to promote and enhance the value of law libraries to the legal and public communities, to foster the profession of law librarianship, and to provide leadership in the field of legal information.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I am not a “career expert,” although I have been a librarian for almost 20 years. I am currently the Chair of the AALL Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee.

Who is your target audience?

Anyone interested in learning more about careers in law librarianship. Many of our users either already have a JD degree or an MLS degree and our seeking information about what additional educational requirements they may need and for how to network with law librarians in their region.

What’s the best way to use your site? Should users consult it daily? Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

Our site is a great place to get started to understand some of the unique aspects to careers in law librarianship. It directs users to additional information at the AALL website including lists of dual JD/MLS programs, job positings, and scholarship opportunities from various AALL regional Chapters, Special Interest Sections, and Caucuses.

Does your site provide:

√ Answers to reader questions
√ Links

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats?

Our site is not active on social media, but the American Association of Law Libraries AALL is active on the following:
√ Twitter: @aallnet
LinkedIn
Facebook
Newsletter
√ Magazine or other periodical: AALL Spectrum
Blog
Flickr

Do you charge for anything on your site?

No, our site is free to all.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

Since the site is an information portal, we don’t really track or follow-up on specific job positions people who use our site eventually find. We have through the site been able to match up people interested in learning more about law librarianship with law librarians in their local area, so I consider that a successful outcome of the site.

wendy mooreAnything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

Law Librarianship is a very specialized form of librarianship. The more flexible you are concerning your geographic location, the easier time you will have in securing a position. Also carefully read the educational and experience requirements in job ads and make certain you meet (or will meet before the start date) those requirements before applying for a position as the requirements are usually not flexible.

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Filed under Job Hunters Web Guide, Law Library, MLIS Students

Library School Career Center: University of Illinois

Here is this week’s installment of the Library School Career Center feature, which is presented in partnership with the folks from the blog Hack Library School.  If you’re interested in library education, or in new ideas and the future of the profession, you should check it out.  


Roy Brooks

This interview is with Roy Brooks, LIS Career Specialist at the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library & Information Science. He earned his M.A. in Library & Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Career Center Information

Who staffs the career center?  Please talk a little about how it is managed and run?

At Illinois GSLIS, career services are coordinated by Roy Brooks, the LIS Career Specialist. The Career Specialist helps students figure out where they want to go professionally and how to get there.

Roy collaborates with faculty, staff, alumni, and other friends of the GSLIS program to deliver a full suite of services and programming that helps students and alumni through their career development process. Assistance can range from exploring career options to identifying deep experiential learning opportunities to salary negotiation, and beyond. GSLIS has a talented alumni base and making connections between students and alums is a primary strategy in affording students the opportunity to receive career advice from active practicing professionals in their interest areas.

Students also have access to services offered by the campus Career Center and Graduate College Career Services – both in-person and virtually and subsequently alumni have access to the University of Illinois Alumni Career Center.

Are there “career experts” on staff?  What are their credentials?

Roy Brooks has a wide range of experience working in both public and academic libraries as well as a masters degree in Library and Information Science. GSLIS also has a strong faculty, staff and alumni base that contributes to the career advising services.

Does the career center provide any of the following:

√ Job Listings   √ Resume/CV Review   √ Help writing cover letters
√ Literature/articles   √ General Career coaching   √ Networking events  (virtual or in-person)
√  Other (Please Specify): Students are also able to take advantage of the GSLIS Alternative Spring Break (ASB) program. With ASB, GSLIS staff assists students in finding one-week placements at libraries and other information service settings during Spring Break. These experiential learning opportunities are very valuable when exploring career opportunities and building a professional network.

Do you provide in-person services?

√ Appointments   √ Speakers, or programs that present experts
√ Mixers or other networking events
√ Drop-in career center: As long as Roy is in his office, generally 9-5.

Do you provide online services?

√ Website with resources   √ Webinars   √ Twitter: @GSLIScareers 
√ LinkedIn
√ Other: Pinterest (new)

The careers website is in the middle of an overhaul — http://www.lis.illinois.edu/careers/explorecareers

Check back soon to see the new and improved GSLIS careers site!

Everything available to on-campus students is also available to online students. Students can call/skype or chat (GSLIScareers@gmail.com) with the Career Specialist by appointment or by “drop-in.” Evening/weekend appointments are also available for those students working full time or with busy schedules. Programs/workshops/speakers are available online and often recorded.

What do you think is the best way for students to use the career center?

Start early! It is never too early in the program to start career planning – identifying career options, learning about job search strategies, practicing application writing and interviewing techniques, getting help with networking, navigating professional organizations etc. Everyone will need help or guidance with some aspect of career development and should check in with the Career Specialist to talk about their goals in order to identify where the school may be able to help them.

May alumni use career center resources?

Yes! All resources and services are available to alums.

Are there any charges for services?

No charge!

Anything else you’d like to share with readers about your services in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

Advice for job seekers: Work hard! Start early. Network. Be flexible where possible. Become involved in student and professional organizations. Find a mentor. Obtain hands on experience. Ask for help! Stay motivated and poised. Stay organized in your job search. Build your “brand.” Ask for more help!

University of Illinois Graduate School

Students’ Career Paths

Can you share any statistics about employment rates after graduation?

We survey recent graduates about their job seeking experience. The vast majority find positions shortly after graduation, but rates vary depending on geographic scope and area of specialization.

Can you talk a little bit about the school’s approach to internships, practicums and/or volunteering?

We recognize the importance of gaining hands on experience that complements a student’s academic program and highly encourage students to take advantage of as many opportunities as possible. The GSLIS Practicum Coordinator works with students to identify and secure experiences.

Does the school have a stated approach or policy on helping students to find careers?

We aim to provide the most comprehensive services possible. If you need help, we will find a way to help you – even if that is outside of our advertised suite of services. We understand that you come to our program seeking a rewarding career and we want to do all we can to help you realize your goals.

Are there any notable graduates?

Too many to list!

Demographics

How many students in the library school?

665 students in the MS program

What degree(s) do you offer?

MS LIS, CAS LIS, PhD LIS

More on Programs of Study: http://www.lis.illinois.edu/academics/programs

Is it ALA accredited?

Yes.

What are the entrance requirements?

Bachelors degree, 3.0/4.0 in the last two years of undergrad study, resume, essays, three letters of reference.

More details at: http://www.lis.illinois.edu/admissions/requirements/ms

When was the library school founded?

1893

Where are you?

√ Midwestern US

Where are you?

√ City/town

Anything else you’d like to share that’s unique about the school?

Our programs include the longest running LIS doctoral program, an award winning online education program, LEEP, and robust continuing education opportunities. Our students benefit from ample engagement with the vast resources of the University of Illinois library.


Nicole HelregelThis interview was conducted by Nicole Helregel, a second-year master’s student at the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library & Information Science. She works as a graduate assistant at the Funk ACES Library She hopes to one day become a reference or outreach librarian at an academic library. Find her on twitter (@nhelregel) and follow her blog here.

 

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Filed under City/town, Library School Career Center, Midwestern US, MLIS Students

Job Hunter’s Web Guide: MLA Deal

One thing this blog has made me aware of is all the different ways that state library associations help out job hunters. You know how it’s super tough to get that very first library job?  And how sometimes new professionals feel a little hung out to dry once they’ve graduated?  Well, this week’s post is about  a Maryland resource which helps address that problem, and provides a lot of great support for developing a library career.  This week we’re featuring MLA Deal!


MLA Deal

What is it? Please give us your elevator speech!

DEAL (Development of Emerging and Aspiring Librarians) is an interest group of the Maryland Library Association (MLA) dedicated to providing new professionals and library students with resources to create the library career they want.

When was it started? Why was it started?

MLA has had a student interest group for some time now, but around Spring of 2011 Mark de Jong, our Chair, started talking seriously about revamping it. Through his direction and the vision and efforts of our team, we’ve relaunched the group, expanded its audience, and reignited interest in MLA! Our main goal was to help those new to librarianship (early-career librarians, students, and library techs) navigate the waters of employment, providing opportunities to network and explore the profession and giving them tools to get the jobs they wanted.

Who runs it?

Mark de Jong, an active member of MLA, is our Chair. But in reality we have a much more decentralized approach. There’s a somewhat large group of us (around 12), but we’ve each got dedicated roles. I’m the social media manager, so I oversee our Twitter & LinkedIn accounts, as well as some of the blog.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I’m hesitant to call myself a career expert, but being in school and concerned about finding a job that used my degree has provided plenty of motivation for me to research different career options! The thing about the DEAL leadership team that I love so much is that we represent such different paths for information professionals. For instance, Lindsay Sarin (our mentorship expert and conference liaison) is a coordinator for University of Maryland’s MLS program, so her job is to help library school students think strategically about their time in school and how it relates to their career goals. Katy Berube, who contributes to our blog, is an academic librarian with an immense wealth of HR knowledge that we’re lucky to draw from. We’ve all got different strengths and areas of expertise, and together it helps to enrich the kind of career development programming that DEAL offers.

Who is your target audience?

While our aim is to help library school students and new-to-the-field professionals, we also reach out to those who are more established in their careers for advice and mentorship opportunities.

What’s the best way to use your site? Should users consult it daily? Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

Everyone should use all of our web presences daily- just kidding! We actually have a multi-platform approach for our group with the intention that people could participate as much or as little as they wanted. Our blog is our main programming focus, featuring bi-monthly career development posts by the aforementioned Katy. These posts are designed to be followed almost as steps for building networks, finding relevant job postings, writing resumes, cover letters, etc. We also post news related items and job/internship/volunteer opportunities on the blog. Our LinkedIn group builds on Katy’s programming, serving as a space for people to connect and share how they’ve worked through her blog challenges. The group is also a place for general networking and discussion. Lastly, our Twitter is meant to be an everyday news item source. I do some relevant job/internship/volunteer opportunity posts, but also share general career advice, publicize good professional resources (like Hiring Librarians!) and interesting tidbits from Libraryland.

DEAL_logo

Does your site provide:

√ Job Listings √ Answers to reader questions
√ Articles/literature √ Links
√ Coaching √ The opportunity for interaction
Advice on:
√ Cover Letters √ Resumes
√ Interviewing √ Networking

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats?

√ Twitter: @MLA_DEAL
LinkedIn
√ Newsletter: well, you can sign up for our listserv on the MLA site!
√ Other: BlogMLA site

Do you charge for anything on your site?

Nope! Access to all of our resources are free. We do encourage people to join MLA, however. We’ve been able to secure a lot of funding through our scholarship program, which allows current MLA members to contribute the cost of a year-long student membership to MLA. We’ve received a ton of support on this initiative, including a rather generous donation from an HR and organizational development consulting company (thanks Singer Group!). As a group, we’re extremely proud to be able to offer this to our members.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

We’re still relatively new, and we just reached how to write resumes in our programming, so we haven’t had the chance to start making career connections. We have, however, been successful in finding students mentors, internships, field study sites, and even freelance work!

meredith loweAnything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

My personal piece of advice for job hunting isn’t necessarily unique, but has always proven wise in my experiences- be open, be professional, and be social! The last one can be hard for librarians, but every interesting work-related opportunity I’ve gotten has been a result of meeting people and staying in contact. You might meet someone in a hiring position for your dream organization, but at that moment they don’t have an open position perfect for you. Staying in contact and making a consistently good impression does wonders, though, and they’ll remember you when something comes up. Oh, also join your state library association! They’re an easy way to involved and you’ll definitely meet people who can connect you to job opportunities. If you’re a MD resident, contact us for details on how to get a free MLA membership!

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Filed under Job Hunters Web Guide, MLIS Students, Northeastern US