Tag Archives: cv

Further Questions: Do you like hyperlinks included in resumes for sample or demonstration purposes?

This week we asked people who hire librarians:

Do you like hyperlinks included in resumes for sample or demonstration purposes? How have you seen this done well (or poorly)?

{Question suggestion via Twitter – we are always open to question suggestions… email hiringlibrariansquestions at gmail dot com or contact us on Twitter @hiringlib.}

Laurie Phillips

We’re fine with it. I send all of the applications to each of the search team electronically so they can click on links for that sort of thing. It’s nice if someone has an example of a project that is applicable. Remember that the committee members may print out your application for the initial screening meeting, so that may be lost. But committee members will review applications before and after that meeting. I can’t recall if I’ve seen someone do this.
– Laurie Phillips, Associate Dean for Technical Services, J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library, Loyola University New Orleans

When we were hiring a new Graphics person, we found candidates used this feature and it was very useful. Don’t know how it would work for other positions.

– Kaye Grabbe, Lake Forest Library

I have seen applicants do this in their publishing and presenting section which I find helpful given we are hiring for faculty positions. I have also seen this done throughout an applicant’s CV to show general, non-scholarly work which I think is distracting an inappropriate. Some applicants will provide one link to a professional blog (or similar) where they have non-scholarly work in one place which is acceptable, in this case, however, it is work that the applicant has selected which has not gone through a peer review process like a presentation or publication would have.

– Julie Leuzinger, Department Head, Eagle Commons Library, University of North Texas

J. McRee ElrodYes, so long as they are well labeled.  They are excellent for lengthy resumes, and in our case, sample MARC records which have been prepared.
– J. McRee (Mac) Elrod, Special Libraries Catalouging

 

 

Thank you as always to our contributors for their time and insight.  If you’re someone who hires librarians and are interested in participating in this feature, please email us at hiringlibrariansquestionsATgmail.com.

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Further Questions: Do You Prefer Long or Short Resumes/CVs?

This week’s question is from a reader (and it echoes one of the questions in the original survey, so it may sound a little familiar).  I asked people who hire librarians:
Do you generally ask for resumes or CVs?  Do you prefer long or short ones and why?  How many pages should it be?
Marleah AugustineFor part-time staff [support staff], a resume is a nice bonus but it is not required. A single-page resume would be fine for those purposes. When we have hired full-time staff, we do require a resume. Those we do expect to spill over onto two pages.
We will not accept a resume in lieu of an application form.
– Marleah Augustine, Adult Department Librarian at Hays Public Library
Emilie SmartOur City HR dept does not use resumes but I like to see them at the interview.
One page is the preferred length — no more than 2 pages.
– Emilie Smart, Division Coordinator of Reference Services & Computer Services at East Baton Rouge Parish Library
I prefer a resume that is long enough to give details about relevant job experience and other library experience.  For most people, that will be at least 2 pages.  For someone with many years of experience, it may well be longer.  For academic positions where publications and service are important, it may also be longer.  I prefer not to receive a long CV of 7-10 pages.  I think the important information can get buried in the long lists of presentations and workshops.  However, try to follow the instructions of the jobs posting and send what they ask for.  Different institutions ask for different things.  The cover letter is also an opportunity to highlight particular skills or experiences.
– Anonymous (Academic Librarian)
Laurie PhillipsI would say CV. A one-page resume just isn’t enough information for a faculty position.
That said, don’t expect your CV to highlight everything in our qualifications. You need to pull those things out and discuss them in your letter of application.
If you are just graduating, two pages should suffice. However, be sure to include what you actually did in any job that’s relevant.
– Laurie Phillips, Associate Dean for Technical Services, J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library, Loyola University New Orleans
Our application does not require a resume or cover letter,  but I always appreciate when either (or both) are included.  The positions I oversee don’t require too much (1 year of customer service, 6 months of library experience, sort of thing), so I like a cover letter and resume each kept to one page—but they should be a full page.  If you can’t find enough to write about yourself for four whole paragraphs, why do I want you?  I think it’s fine to leave items off a resume that aren’t relevant, or to sacrifice less-relevant long-ago experience to tell me more about your recent public library job of 3 years.Not only are the cover letter and resume space for you to include information about yourself that didn’t fit in the application, it’s where you show your abilities to write and use programs, and to show your care and attention.  I’ve chosen not to interview people based on a mess of a cover letter, full of spelling errors, not properly aligned, etc.  Use the resume to 1, tell me about your grant-writing, and 2, show me you can use bullets and tables.– Sarah Morrison, Adult Services Librarian, Neill Public Library, Pullman, Washington

Dusty Snipes GresI ask for a resume and a letter of inquiry.

I prefer that the letter be no more than 2 pages and the resume no more than 2 pages, although I will read what is submitted.  What I want is a brief overview of education and experience, and a good idea of the ability to communicate clearly.

If I need more info such as what would be on a CV, then I request it after the initial review.

– Dusty Gres, Director, Ohoopee Regional Library System

Terry Ann LawlerI think our online hiring process asks for resumes. I, personally have a CV, but that is just a style preference. I prefer resumes that have all of the information that I need, regardless of length, but prefer around 2-3 pages.

A resume should be as long as it needs to be to highlight your experiences and skills. That being said, when one is screening 150+ resumes, and yours is 8 pages long, expect those pages not to be read.

The general idea is that the resume gets you the interview and the interview gets you the job. So, your resume doesn’t need paragraphs of information about how great your customer services skills are.
Here are some tips:
  • Get all of the vital stuff like skills that match the job description and your contact info in the top half of the first page.
  • Support your years of experience. If you claim to have 4 years of collection development experience in your cover letter, it should say it somewhere on your resume as well, either in your job title or in your job duties.
  • Make sure that all of your pertinent skills (such as collection development or storytime or supervising) have a number of years next to them. That makes it much easier for scanners to check off the little boxes in their matrix and interview you.
– Terry Lawler, Assistant Manager and Children’s Librarian, Palo Verde Branch, Phoenix Public Library

We ask for a CV at our library but we have many applicants who send a resume instead. Depending on the applicant pool, those who send a resume instead of a CV may not be considered for an interview for failure to follow directions.

Unfortunately, there are no right or wrong answers to the question of how long a resume or CV should be, only a guideline. A mentor of mine once told me that a resume is more of a marketing piece to catch an employer’s interest. I think this is a good way to frame a person’s thoughts around the difference between a CV and a resume. As a guideline, a resume could be a couple of pages which highlight work, service and publishing that are in the area of the job you are applying for, a CV should list everything so it should be as long as it takes. I think the increase in academic libraries asking for a CV over a resume is a good indicator to MLS students to start their professional development early (writing, presenting, service on committees, etc.)

As far as my preference, I think a candidate should be honest and concise. In this case, the CV is as long as it needs to be. I would not want to see a resume over three pages since I am probably looking through several.

– Julie Leuzinger, Department Head, Eagle Commons Library, University of North Texas Libraries

Thank you as always to our contributors for their time and insight.  If you’re someone who hires librarians and are interested in participating in this feature, please email me at hiringlibrariansATgmail.com.

Thank YOU for reading!  Walking down the road with your pistol at your waist, Johnny you’re too comment.

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Further Questions: Does Your Library Do Background Checks?

This week I asked people who hire librarians:

Does your organization do background checks?  If it does, what exactly is checked? Credit rating, conviction history, job or education history, etc.? What kinds of things would keep a candidate from getting hired?

Emilie Smart

We do not do background checks on classified employees nor does the City’s HR Dept (which handles all City employment applications).

– Emilie Smart, Division Coordinator of Reference Services & Computer Services at East Baton Rouge Parish Library

Marleah AugustineAt this time we do not do background checks. We do ask that if someone has been convicted of a felony, that they explain that charge. We haven’t had too many issues with it, but I think that a candidate would not get hired if their felony conviction was violence or theft related. As for job or education history, we just call references rather than doing a formal background check.

– Marleah Augustine, Adult Department Librarian at Hays Public Library

Nicola FranklinAs a recruiter the type of background checks I do varies depending on the type of role I’m looking to place the candidate in.  For those seeking just a permanent position, I carry out an interview (to fact check their resume for the skills and experience they’ve laid claim to, and to assess personality, attitude and motivations).  Other checks (for example taking up references, medical, credit check) remain the responsibility of the ultimate hirer and are usually carried out by them (although once in a while a client will ask me to carry out the reference checks on their behalf).  For those seeking contract or freelance work, in addition to the interview, I take up the references myself, and also check their eligibility to work in the country where the job is based (UK, USA or elsewhere).  References could be from employers or educational institutes or both, depending on the person’s career history and the requirements of the job.

Reference checking in the UK can be a frustrating process as employers are very wary of committing anything to paper that could later be deemed to be a subjective opinion and so open to legal challenge if it caused any disadvantage to the candidate.  Many written references are therefore little more than confirmation of employment dates, job title and number of sickness days (if any).  To counter this I often take up a verbal reference, as people are often willing to be more frank on the phone.

The main thing that would stop me putting a candidate forward to a client would be lying on their resume/CV, whether about qualifications, length or type of experience or skills.

– Nicola Franklin, Director, The Library Career Centre Ltd.

 

J. McRee Elrod

 

 

No.  For a distance cataloguer it is irrelevant.

– J. McRee (Mac) Elrod, Special Libraries Catalouging

 

Thank you as always to our contributors for their time and insight.  If you’re someone who hires librarians and are interested in participating in this feature, please email me at hiringlibrariansATgmail.

Thanks for reading! I hope you found some comment ground!

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Filed under Further Questions, Public, Recruiters