Tag Archives: GLAM careers

Are you going to be dead weight for us to carry?

A photo by Ian Robertson of Dorothy Davies [left],the librarian at the Trenton Public Library. She is holding books and looking at a poster advertising Gilmour & Co. Lumbering Industries near the mouth of the Trent River in Trenton, Ontario.
HC03646. Photo by Flickr user Community Archives.

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Division Manager

Titles hired include: Librarian I/II/II, Supervising Librarian, Library Assistant

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ HR

√ Library Administration

√ A Committee or panel 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application 

√ Supplemental Questions 

√ Oral Exam/Structured interview 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Applications go to HR for initial screening. Those who are deemed qualified are sent to have an interview with a hiring committee panel at the Library. Committee discusses all candidates at the end of the interview process and chooses the top candidates based on the interviews and application materials.  Send those names to our Director for approval.

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

The candidate was really engaged, personable. They weren’t uptight. They paused to think about their answers rather than just diving in and never really answering the questions. They asked us to repeat the questions if they weren’t sure they hit all the points they needed to make. And they sold us on them.

What are your instant dealbreakers?

If your answer to “why do you want this position” is anything like “it’s the next step in my career” or “I want a raise.”

And if the candidate doesn’t have any questions for us at the end.  Show me you’re engaged and excited about the opportunity!

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

Are you going to be a bust? Are you going to be dead weight for us to carry?

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant 

Resume: √ Two is ok, but no more 

CV: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant 

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

If it’s an internal interview, the candidate depends on the panel’s prior knowledge of the candidate’s experience and achievements.

External candidates who don’t do any research into our community.

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

We have done virtual interviews.

Test your equipment in advance!  BE ON TIME. 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

Ask about the position.  Ask about the goals, the hurdles, and/or the expectations.

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Western US 

What’s your region like?

√ Urban

√ Suburban

√ Rural 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 201+  

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Filed under 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, 200+ staff members, Public, Rural area, Suburban area, Urban area, Western US

we don’t have any questions that talk about working with children although we encounter children throughout the library.

Librarians standing behind a shelf in the Reference Collection at Metropolitan State University, on September 4, 2009.
Librarians 2009 (1). By Flickr user Library and Information Services Metropolitan State University

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Assistant Manager

Titles hired include: Youth Services Assistants (PT and FT), Adult Services Assistants (PT and FT), Circulation Assistants (PT and FT), Evening/Weekend Supervisor, Central Librarian

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ HR

√ Library Administration

√ The position’s supervisor

√ A Committee or panel 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application

√ Cover letter

√ Resume 

√ References 

√ More than one round of interviews 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ Yes 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Applicants apply online. It is screened by the HR manager and then sent to the hiring managers (my manager and me). We review applications and schedule phone interviews. We select the top 3 candidates and invite them for in person interviews. If necessary, we will conduct a second in person interview. 

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

Knowledge of library practices was a huge plus. Answered questions in a clear and understandable manner. Asked questions.

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

When candidates do not understand how a public library operates. 

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

We are limited to a pool of questions that we can ask from. Sometimes these questions aren’t the best for the positions. For example, we don’t have any questions that talk about working with children although we encounter children throughout the library. 

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One!  

Resume: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant  

CV:  √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant  

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Focusing only on one aspect of the job.

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

We conduct phone interviews. It helps if they are clear and concise with their answers. Also make sure there is good services/WiFi. 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad  

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

I believe it should be relevant to the position they apply for. It should change per person/position. 

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Southeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Urban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 101-200 

Author’s note: Hey, thanks for reading! If you like reading, why not try commenting or sharing? Or are you somebody who hires Library, Archives or other LIS workers? Please consider giving your own opinion by filling out the survey here.

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Filed under 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Public, Southeastern US, Urban area

We are so small and get so few applications that we pretty much interview anyone that looks close

A group of about 50 librarians, in suits
Australian Institute of Librarians’ inaugural meeting at Canberra, August 20, 1937. Photographer A. Collingridge, Canberra. By Flickr user State Library of New South Wales

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Director

Titles hired include: Library assistant, library aide, Assistant Director 

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ Library Administration 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Cover letter

√ Resume 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

I post the job, receive the applications, choose who to interview, my assistant director and I interview them, and I decide who to hire with her input 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

Not following directions in posting, resumes or cover letters clearly written for a different job posting.

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

How they work with others

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Two is ok, but no more  

Resume: √ Only One!   

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Not asking questions of us

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

No

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

Explaining 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

Nothing specific. We are so small and get so few applications that we pretty much interview anyone that looks close

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

Show interest in the library and what it does. 

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Midwestern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Rural 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 11-50 

Author’s note: Hey, thanks for reading! If you like reading, why not try commenting or sharing? Or are you somebody who hires Library, Archives or other LIS workers? Please consider giving your own opinion by filling out the survey here.

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Filed under 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, 10-50 staff members, Midwestern US, Public, Rural area

We love non-library candidates!

Photograph of Martin Burrell. By Flickr user Archives of the Law Society of Ontario

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Head of Circulation / Bookkeeper 

Titles hired include: Library Associates and Library Assistants (ft and pt clerks) 

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ Library Administration

√ The position’s supervisor 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Cover letter

√ Resume 

√ Other: We have a short interview and usually ask final candidate for references if they haven’t been offered. 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ Other: Applications through indeed have questions, but candidates can also email cover letter and resume directly and not do those. 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

We usually post a few places online, indeed and job boards – I go through the candidates and get down to 15-30 possibilities to interview. My boss (library director) and I decide on which of those to interview together. We do interviews with the two of us and make final decision together. 

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

We put an emphasis on customer service – candidates who recognize this as a large portion of the job and give thoughtful, complete answers to these questions are the most impressive. 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

People who state that they want to work at a library because they “love to read” or “want a quiet job.” 

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

I think self motivation is the biggest issue for us – it’s hard to tell how motivated candidates are unless they’re actually hired. 

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One! 

Resume: √ Two is ok, but no more  

CV: √ Two is ok, but no more  

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Responding as though they didn’t read the job description. 

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

We have, as necessary with COVID and candidates living out of state. Part of the job is tech support for patrons, so candidates who can’t figure out their own tech is a red flag. 

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

We love non-library candidates! We might be more open than most but most of our questions are geared toward similar experiences, not exact situations from the past. 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

We do have questions on the Indeed posts, which can limit some, even if they can be avoided. We try to look for a variety of people and experiences when interviewing, but there are certain conditions like “lifting weight” which while not strictly necessary for every person, are necessary to have some staff members able to do. 

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

I like when candidates ask about good and bad parts of our jobs, or the working environment. We do our best to be honest. 

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Midwestern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Suburban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

Author’s note: Hey, thanks for reading! If you like reading, why not try commenting or sharing? Or are you somebody who hires Library, Archives or other LIS workers? Please consider giving your own opinion by filling out the survey here.

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Midwestern US, Public, Suburban area

Applicants frequently oversell or undersell technical skills

a group of librarians pose under a Reference & Research assistance sign
Relaxed librarians. Photo by Flickr user Library and Information Services Metropolitan State University

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Branch Manager

Titles hired include: Regional managers, records managers, literacy coordinators, dept. heads, evening-weekend shift supervisors, entry-level staff

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ A Committee or panel 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application 

√ Supplemental Questions

√ Oral Exam/Structured interview 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ Yes 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Applicants are screened by application software; HR compiles ranked lists of applicants,; hiring committee selects interviewees from ranked list; hiring committee interviews, scores, and selects candidate; HR reviews and vets; job offer is extended by direct supervisor. My role extends from selecting interviewees to job offer.   

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

Immensely thoughtful and knowledgeable response to customer service questions. 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

Unprofessional behavior in the interview.  

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

How well is technical experience reflected in the application and interview; applicants frequently oversell or undersell technical skills.

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ We don’t ask for this  

Resume: √ We don’t ask for this  

CV: √ We don’t ask for this  

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Rambling answers that don’t address our questions are common.

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

N/A

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

Be knowledgeable about the work you’re applying for and show me how your prior experience fits that work.  

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

We’ve changed aspects of screening and ranking, as well the structured interviews we use. Discrimination still exists primarily in the educational disparities in our community, and nation.    

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

Applicants should ask more questions about what their working days will look like, and about what it’s like to serve the whole public, not just folks like themselves. 

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Southeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Urban 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Some of the time and/or in some positions 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 101-200 

Is there anything else you’d like to say, either to job hunters or to me, the survey author? 

None

Author’s note: Hey, thanks for reading! If you like reading, why not try commenting or sharing? Or are you somebody who hires Library, Archives or other LIS workers? Please consider giving your own opinion by filling out the survey here.

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Filed under 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, 100-200 staff members, Public, Southeastern US, Urban area

Stats and Graphs: All About Cover Letters

It just occurred to me that I put out this mini-survey but then didn’t really tell a lot of people that there were results!

As of mid-December 2022, 72 people have taken this mini-survey. It’s still open, so if you’d like to take it, please take the survey here. It’s a little skewed towards organizations that do consider cover letters; please still visit the form to let us know if your organization does not consider them.

This survey is unique in that I will not be posting individual responses on the blog. Instead, you can take a look at the raw data here.

However, you might also be interested in seeing some mediocre graphs, so here you go:

Does your organization consider Cover Letters as part of job applications?  (69 responses)

Yes 88.4% (61)
No 4.3% (3)
Other 7.2% (5)

Do you ask for cover letters explicitly in the job ad or do you just expect to receive them?  (69 responses)

We ask for cover letters specifically in the job ad 66.7% (44)
We don’t specifically ask for them, but we expect to see them 8.7% (6)
We don’t specifically ask for them, but we consider them when we get them 17.4% (12)
Other 7.2% (5)

Do you expect that a cover letter will be tailored to your job opening?  (70 responses)

Yes, and it’s a dealbreaker if it’s not 37.1% (26)
Yes, but it’s not a dealbreaker 41.4% (29)
No, but it can give candidates who do tailor a real advantage 11.4% (8)
No, that seems like a lot of time and effort 1.4% (1)
Other 8.5% (6)

Compared to other parts of the application, I give the cover letter:  (70 responses)

More weight 24.3% (17)
Equal weight 54.3% (38)
Less weight 15.7% (11)
Other 5.7% (4)

How many pages should a cover letter be?  (70 responses)

We don’t ask for this 5.7% (4)
Only One! 4% (28)
Two is ok, but no more 35.7% (25)
As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant 18.6% (13)
As many as it takes, I love reading 0% (0)

What formats are ok for  cover letter be in? (check all that apply) (69 responses)

PDF 89.9% (62)
DOCX 40.6% (28)
DOCX, but PDF is really better because of formatting issues 55.1% (38)
Whatever the Mac format is 7.2% (5)
DOC 29% (20)

If you receive job applications by email, should the cover letter be included: (check all that apply) (65 responses)

In the body of the email 10.8% (7)
As an attachment 63.1% (41)
Either in the body of the email or as an attachment but not both places 20% (13)
Other 20% (13)

If your organization has automated application screening, is the automated screening also applied to cover letters? (68 responses)

Not applicable 48.5% (33)
I don’t know 36.8% (25)
Yes 2.9% (2)
No 10.3% (7)
Other 1.55 (1)

Demographics

What type of organization(s) do you hire for? (Check all that apply) (70 responses)

Academic Library 52.9% (37)
Archives 7.1% (5)
Public Library 31.4% (22)
School Library 0% (0)
Special Library 15.7% (11)
LIS Vendor 1.4% (1)
Other (Historical Society Library) 1.4% (1)

What part of the world are you in? (69 responses)

Midwestern US 27.5% (19)
Northeastern US 15.9% (11)
Southeastern US 20.3% (14)
Southwestern US 7.2% (5)
Western US 13% (9)
Canada 7.2% (5)
UK 4.3% (3)
Other 4.3% (3)

What’s your region like? (Check all that apply) (69 responses)

Urban 47.8% (33)
Suburban US 46.4% (32)
Rural 18.8% (13)
Other (virtual office, university town) 2.9% (2)

Is your workplace remote/virtual? (68 responses)

Always 1.5% (1)
Some of the time and/or in some positions 67.6% (46)
Never or not anymore 29.4% (20)
Other (in person but with virtual service to remote users) 1.5% (1)

How many staff members are at your organization? (68 responses)

0-10 14.7% (10)
11-50 25% (17)
51-100 16.2% (11)
101-200 16.2 (11)
201+ 23.5% (16)
I have no idea 2.9% (2)
Other (20+ in the library, 201+ at University) 1.5% (1)

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No background checks provided by our HR, so we’re in the dark when it comes to criminal history.

Adam Hunter, Chief Librarian from 1904 to 1921, and women at the laying of the cornerstone for the new public library on Main Street West. August 1, 1911. By Flickr user Local History & Archives Hamilton Public Library

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Maker Librarian (supervisor for library makerspace)

Titles hired include: Library Assistants (“Makers-in-Residence”)

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ HR

√ Library Administration

√ The position’s supervisor 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application 

√ Resume 

√ Other: proof of degree for management-level positions

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ Yes 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Applications are submitted online, admin sends applicants to hiring supervisors, supervisors (such as myself) review the applications/resumes/references and make hiring decisions, then send decision to admin and HR for finalizing process.

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

Well-rounded skillset, confidence in answering questions, asking informed questions before/during the interview, displaying knowledge of good customer service practices.

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

Lack of basic tech knowledge/skills. Applying for a position advertised as a specific shift, and asking to drastically change that shift’s schedule. Bringing up political/religious affiliations without appropriate context.

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

No background checks provided by our HR, so we’re in the dark when it comes to criminal history.

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Only One!  

Resume: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant  

CV: √ Only One!  

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Regardless of which department they are applying for, I have a lot of interviewees spend the majority of their interview talking about their love of books and book-based programming. Obviously books are important, but working in a library is about so much more – I want to know what other services/resources our library provides that the interviewee is already aware of, and how they would help expand or supplement what we offer.

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

Virtual interviews are almost non-existent here; we conduct in-person interviews wherever possible, unless a candidate seems like they’d be a strong enough choice to warrant a phone interview.

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

To me, the best person for the job is someone with a robust understanding of good customer service, is capable of working independently, has a love of learning and a willingness to try new things, and is up-to-date in their knowledge of computer/device usage and research skills.

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad  

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Southwestern US

What’s your region like?

√ Other: Most of the population lives in one city, where our library is located, but there are numerous nearby rural towns that depend on the city for its resources.

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 51-100 

Author’s note: Hey, thanks for reading! If you like reading, why not try commenting or sharing? Or are you somebody who hires Library, Archives or other LIS workers? Please consider giving your own opinion by filling out the survey here.

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Filed under 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, 50-100 staff members, Public, Southwestern US

How do you plan to live on this wage?

A black and white portrait of a man with a lush beard and mustache, wearing a suit.
William George Eakins, Chief Librarian of the Law Society of Upper Canada, 1891-1913. By Flickr user Archives of the Law Society of Ontario

This anonymous interview is with someone who hires for a:

√ Public Library 

Title: Head of Adult and Technology Services

Titles hired include: Children’s Librarian, Head of Circulation, Administrative Assistant/Library Associate, assistant circ 

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ Library Administration

√ A Committee or panel

√ Employees at the position’s same level (on a panel or otherwise) 

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application

√ Cover letter

√ Resume

√ References 

√ Supplemental Questions 

√ Demonstration (teaching, storytime, etc) 

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No 

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Hiring committee assembled. Job role reviewed and put out to bid. Application submission, invite for an in-person interview, often includes demonstration or hands on skill portion, job offer. We also pick an alternate as well. We will re-advertise until we find the right candidate. 

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

They responded to the job role meaning they researched it. They knew about the organization’s history and community. They were personable, professional and had a wide breadth of experience. 

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

When application process and requirements aren’t submitted. We may still invite them for an interview, but it counts against them if we have to ask more than once for—say— a cover letter. 

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

How will you find housing here? Do you have stable year-round housing? How do you plan to live on this wage? 

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Two is ok, but no more  

Resume: √ Two is ok, but no more  

CV: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant  

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

No

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

Showcase your ability to multitask and learn 

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad 

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

We have a diverse hiring committee and consider it a metric. Our community is diverse, we ask direct service related questions regarding diversity and acceptance.

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Northeastern US 

What’s your region like?

√ Rural 

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Never or not anymore 

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 0-10 

Author’s note: Hey, thanks for reading! If you like reading, why not try commenting or sharing? Or are you somebody who hires Library, Archives or other LIS workers? Please consider giving your own opinion by filling out the survey here.

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, 1 A Return to Hiring Librarians Survey, Northeastern US, Public, Rural area

Job Hunter’s Web Guide: CLIR and DLF Job Board

Today I am pleased to share a job board that reaches beyond libraries and archives. While you can visit the site anytime, they also send a weekly digest that includes a short note featuring a resource or item of interest. They’re friendly and responsive to feedback – I recommend checking it out!

screenshot of the CLIR DLF job board website

What is it?  Please give us your elevator speech!

The CLIR (Council on Library and Information Resources) and DLF (Digital Library Federation) Job Board is a place for job seekers in the galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM) fields to find current positions posted by CLIR sponsors, DLF members, and non-member organizations. Listings are active for 60 days and require minimum salary to be included. Each week, a job board digest is sent out with the latest listings to digest subscribers. When requested by an employer, we actively promote listings on CLIR and DLF social media.

When was it started?  Why was it started?

The DLF Jobs Board began in 2011 when the DLF staff began posting positions on the DLF blog. In 2015, an email digest of current positions on the board started going out to subscribers. In July 2016, the standalone site – jobs.diglib.org – was started and DLF member institutions could post unlimited jobs for free. During this time, CLIR also had a similar job message board titled “Jobs Connect,” which provided job posting services for CLIR sponsors.

In 2019, the DLF Jobs Board and CLIR’s Jobs Connect combined to become the “CLIR+DLF Jobs Board,” allowing DLF members, CLIR sponsors, and other non-member organizations to post jobs in one location.

In 2020, the board was renamed the “CLIR and DLF Job Board.” Another important change that year was the requirement that all jobs posted specify a minimum salary amount or range. In July 2022, a resource section was added to help job hunters consider issues of cost of living, social issues, and civil rights access as they looked for a new position.

Who runs it?

The job board is run by CLIR and its Digital Library Federation program. The job board is administered by a CLIR staffer (that’s me!), who reviews and approves each job as they are submitted by employers. I also handle any technical issues or problems with payments, when they occur.

Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

I am not a GLAM career expert, but I have worked in libraries, museums, and IT recruiting, and I am fortunate to be surrounded by colleagues at CLIR and DLF who have extensive experience in the fields.

Who is your target audience?

Our current audiences are employers and job seekers in the GLAM and MLIS fields. Most of our sponsors and members are in higher education, but I would like to reach out to organizations of all types that hire people in the GLAM fields.

What’s the best way to use your site?  Should users consult it daily?  Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

I hope that using the job board is straightforward, and I recommend checking periodically during the week. Job postings are lighter during the summer months, so checking more regularly starting in the fall is a good idea.

I am always interested in hearing from job board users! During the pandemic, we made a change in how long jobs were listed, thanks to a user who wrote and shared how depressing it was to see so many job links on the board, but to have most be dead links or jobs that were no longer taking applications. My colleagues and I agreed, and decided that jobs would be active for 60 days unless requested by employers to go longer.

Does your site provide:

√ Job Listings

√ Links  

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats? 

Readers can find jobs listed at jobs.diglib.org and subscribe to the CLIR and DLF Job Board Digest to receive a weekly email newsletter with the latest jobs posted.

Do you charge for anything on your site?

CLIR sponsors and DLF members are able to post unlimited jobs for free. Non-sponsor or member organizations are able to post jobs for $200 per job.

What are your standards for job listings (e.g., must include salary)?

We do not post or publicize unpaid positions or internships. We also require employers to include a minimum salary amount and support fair employment practices. I review every job posted to be certain it is a real position and meets our listing requirements.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

I would love to hear from job board users! I often hear kind messages from job board digest readers about my introduction to each digest, which I greatly appreciate. It would make my day to hear from someone who found their next position using the job board. 

Anything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

There is a lot of information about the GLAM fields online, sometimes positive and helpful, sometimes negative and discouraging. My goal with the job board and the digest is to provide links to jobs and information about professional development opportunities through CLIR and DLF, with a dash of care and hopefulness.

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