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Library School Career Center: University of Pittsburgh

Hey look!  A new installment of the Library School Career Center feature! This is presented in partnership with the folks from the blog Hack Library School.  If you’re interested in library education, or in new ideas and the future of the profession, you should check it out.  


This interview is with Wes Lipschultz, Manager of Student Services in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh.

Career Center Information

Who staffs the career center?  Please talk a little about how it is managed and run.

Our career support comes from three sources:

1) A centralized career development and placement assistance office at the University of Pittsburgh which hosts two liaisons to our School – one focused on career development (resume, cover letter, interview etiquette, mock interviews, monitoring your social media presence, etc.), and one focused on job placement (developing relationships with employers, connecting our students with those employers, etc.).

2) Student Services staff who host monthly professional development sessions (building a portfolio, looking at “outside the box” careers, how to network, etc.), and

3) A cadre of willing alumni/ae who have agreed to review resumes/cover letters/conduct mock phone interviews on an ongoing basis with our current students.

Are there “career experts” on staff?  What are their credentials?

The two liaisons to our school are career experts; their positions, experience, and professional associations are focused entirely on career development and employer relations.

Does the career center provide any of the following:

√ Job Listings                      √ Resume/CV Review                   √ Help writing cover letters

√ Interview Practice                        √ Networking events

Do you provide in-person services?

√ Appointments                                          √ Speakers, or programs that present experts

√ Mixers or other networking events          √ Job Fairs

√  Drop-in career center: Our liaisons are available M-F 10 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Do you provide online services?

√ Website with resources   √ Newsletter

√ Twitter: @ischool_pitt

√ LinkedIn:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups/School-Information-Sciences-Pitt-41203/about

√ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ischoolpitt

What do you think is the best way for students to use the career center?

Students should attend our monthly professional development sessions and avail themselves of the assistance of our career development liaison from the start. They may also wish to consider beginning to develop a professional portfolio during their first semester. As they gain more experience (through field experiences, volunteer work, and/or other formal or informal practical experience opportunities), they may wish to attend our professional development day and practice mock interviews with current alumni/ae. They then should begin to have our alumni/ae review their resumes, cover letters, etc. They should monitor our Facebook, LinkedIn, and listserv postings for job opportunities, and they can use the University’s central job database, FutureLinks, to access more general job postings as well.

May alumni use career center resources?

Alumni can attend our professional development sessions for free and can access FutureLinks for a nominal fee.

Are there any charges for services?

Yes – a nominal fee.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using the career center?

One “outside the box” case was particularly interesting.  I was contacted by a local finance firm that was looking for someone to assist them in sorting through their documents, policies, records, etc. with the goal of coming up with an introduction and training manual for their employees. I posted this need to our listserv and was contacted by an MLIS student who had prior experience managing items in a museum. The fit seemed perfect to me, and the employer agreed. She was hired!

Anything else you’d like to share with readers about your services in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

We wish to continue to sustain relationships between our MLIS students and traditional employment settings, but we are also noticing (and excited about) the fact that less traditional employers in Pittsburgh seem to face a growing need for the skills our MLIS graduates possess.  We are working on making connections with these employers and we are also trying to help our students realize that there are relevant and interesting opportunities in such settings as well.

Students’ Career Paths

Can you share any statistics about employment rates after graduation?

All information pertaining to employment and employment statistics for our school can be found here: http://www.ischool.pitt.edu/about/career-resources.php

Can you talk a little bit about the school’s approach to internships, practicums and/or volunteering?

Pittsburgh has a rich cultural infrastructure worthy of a city many times its size.  As such, we have many opportunities for relevant experience for our students. We call our credit-bearing internships/practica “field experiences” and our students are encouraged to choose this option as part of their degree (all specializations allow for this as part of the degree requirements). We also have, on a very competitive and space-limited basis, the Partners Program.  This program is akin to a co-op for graduate students.  When a student is chosen for this program, they are placed in a local employment setting relevant to their degree for an entire year.  The student works between 10-20 hours a week in this setting and in turn typically receives a partial tuition scholarship.

Does the school have a stated approach or policy on helping students to find careers?

Our approach is multi-faceted and involves school staff, career staff, and alumni/ae of the School.  We want our students to be able to clearly articulate the skills they develop and map them to both traditional and nontraditional career settings.

Does the school have any relationships with organizations that offer fellowships or other post-graduate opportunities?

Yes – our faculty, staff, and liaisons are all connected with different potential employers, but as we become aware, we share job postings with each other and these postings make their way to our listservs.

Are there any notable graduates?

We have many alumni/ae who are known and respected in their profession. Each year we highlight those whose personal and professional achievements we deem as outstanding here:

http://www.ischool.pitt.edu/alumni/about/laureates.php

Demographics

How many students in the library school?

We are an iSchool. The iSchool comprises between 700-800 students total in a given year.  About 150 of those are undergraduates, 80 are doctoral students, and the rest are Master’s or certificate students. Of those, 250-300 are MLIS students.

What degree(s) do you offer?

In Information Science we offer an undergraduate degree, a Master’s, a post-Master’s certificate, and a doctorate.

In Telecommunications we offer a Master’s, a post-Master’s certificate, and a doctorate.

In Library and Information Science we offer a Master’s, a post-Master’s certificate, and a doctorate.

Is it ALA accredited?

Our LIS program is ALA accredited.

What are the entrance requirements?

Please see this site for our most current requirements for our on-campus MLIS degree:

http://www.ischool.pitt.edu/lis/degrees/mlis-admissions.php

…and this site for our most current requirements for our online MLIS degree:

http://www.ischool.pitt.edu/online-mlis/admissions/application-process.php

Where are you?

√ Northeastern US

Where are you?

√ Urban area

Anything else you’d like to share that’s unique about the school?

The combination of the rich cultural heritage of Pittsburgh coupled with its small size and “down home” feel makes for a setting that uniquely engages the intellect yet makes you feel like you are family.


Brianna Marshall

This interview was conducted by Brianna Marshall, who is a second year dual-degree Master of Library Science and Master of Information Science student at Indiana University’s School of Library and Information Science. She is Managing Editor for Hack Library School and a 2012-2013 HASTAC scholar. Learn more about Brianna through her blog and portfolio or by following her on Twitter @notsosternlib

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Filed under Library School Career Center, MLIS Students, Northeastern US, Urban area

Library School Career Center: University of Washington

Here is this week’s installment of the Library School Career Center feature, which is presented in partnership with the folks from the blog Hack Library School.  If you’re interested in library education, or in new ideas and the future of the profession, you should check it out.  


This interview is with Janet Matta, who is the Career Services Advisor for the Information School at the University of Washington, serving the career development of 850 iSchool students in four academic programs. Prior to her joining the University of Washington Information School, Janet was a Career Counselor at the University of Washington – Bothell, provided career support to high school students at a small nonprofit, Bainbridge Youth Services, and did her Career Counseling Internship with the University of Washington Evans School of Public Affairs. She has a Masters of Education from Seattle University and an undergraduate degree in History from Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada. In addition to her career counseling experience, Janet spent 6 years in environmental consulting for oil spill response, and gets excited about environmental science. Her diverse background means she’s great at connecting students to ideas and resources in a wide range of professional disciplines. Janet is deeply passionate about helping students find and create unique careers that are a perfect match for their interests and strengths, and loves teaching career skills like networking, interviewing, and salary negotiation to students. Learn more about Janet at www.linkedin.com/in/janetmatta/

Career Center Information

Who staffs the career center?  Please talk a little about how it is managed and run.

Janet is the Career Services Advisor for the iSchool, which includes the Masters of Library and Information Science (MLIS) program. Her office is in the Office of Student Services for the Information School which includes academic advisors, the admissions advisor, and support staff.

Are there “career experts” on staff?  What are their credentials?

Janet has 3 years of experience in career advising and over 10 years of experience in training and education of adults and youth. She has an M.Ed. in Student Development Administration, and spends every free moment possible staying up to date on hiring trends and techniques to help students succeed in their future jobs.

Does the career center provide any of the following:

√  Job Listings                   √ Resume/CV Review                    √ Help writing cover letters
√ Literature/articles          √ Interview Practice                       √ General career coaching
√ Networking events

Do you provide in-person services?

√ Appointments        √  Speakers, or programs that present experts
√ Mixers or other networking events          √ Job Fairs
√ Drop-in career center:  Set drop-in hours each quarter, and students routinely pop in when my office door is open.

Do you provide online services?

√ Website with resources   √ Blog: updated 1x per week
√ Facebook: updates to student group pages and the Office of Student Services Facebook page                              √ Newsletter: published online at http://ischooloss.wordpress.com/
√ Other: online and phone advising appointments to distance students, a jobs and internships database just for iSchool students and alumni.

What do you think is the best way for students to use the career center?

I augment the resources available through the main UW Career Center, so I recommend that students visit and bookmark the content on the UW Career Center website, or visit with Career Center professionals for resume/cover letter reviews, and then to schedule an appointment with me if they want more specialized support! Attend workshops and employer information sessions to learn about common topics and to network with professionals. The more you attend that will help you network with professionals across a variety of industries and sectors the better, and not just with traditional libraries!

May alumni use career center resources?

Alumni can use our job and internships database, called iCareers, and can utilize web resources and the resources available through the UW Career Center.

Are there any charges for services?

Nope!

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using the career center?

I have received a few thank you notes from students who credit their appointment with career services to increasing their confidence and helping them generate ideas and contacts that have led to internships or full time jobs. It makes me so happy to know that our services are helpful to students!

Anything else you’d like to share with readers about your services in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

I advocate creativity in the job search and career development process! I ask students to think about their values and what they want to be doing every day, and then to think creatively about all the different environments and organizations that might benefit from their skill set that an MLIS and their other professional backgrounds provide. In a market that’s tough for libraries, our students are active and successful in a variety of corporate, nonprofit, or government settings in addition to traditional library environments.

Students’ Career Paths

Can you share any statistics about employment rates after graduation?

We unfortunately have never had a response rate of over 51%  to surveys of our graduates, so we don’t currently have very accurate data on employment rates after graduation.

Can you talk a little bit about the school’s approach to internships, practicums and/or volunteering?

Internships for our MLIS students are highly encouraged! The more experience a student has the better, and internships can lead to great contacts and skills that will help you land a job later. I advocate that students take on as much internship or independent experience as they can to bolster their experience, their network of contacts, and their resume. Students work with me to find great internship options, and with their academic advisor to figure out how to get credit.

Does the school have a stated approach or policy on helping students to find careers?

The mission of iSchool Career Services is:

Mission Statement

We make information work for your career. The iSchool Career Adviser offers information on job search skills, advising on career development, and connections to resources and employers tailored to the information field. We help you to stand out and be noticed no matter where you are in your professional career.

Commitment to Students

Our first responsibility is to connect the student experience at the iSchool to the professional goals of our students.  We focus on the information profession and refer students to the UW Career Center for other general career counseling and workshops.

Commitment to Employers

Our students are highly qualified to fill roles as information professionals in a variety of organizations. We facilitate job recruitment through a fair and equitable process that is driven by the needs of our students. The iSchool supports and abides by theNational Association of Colleges and Employers Principles for Professional Practice.

Are there any notable graduates?

Too many to count!

Demographics

How many students in the library school?

Approximately 400

What degree(s) do you offer?

MLIS

Is it ALA accredited?

Yes

What are the entrance requirements?

  • Bachelors degree* or higher in any discipline (must be equivalent to a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution)

  • Grade point average of 3.0 or higher (exceptions considered on a case by case basis)

  • Law MLIS program applicants must have:

○     JD from a law school within the US

When was the library school founded?

1911

Where are you?

√ Western US

Where are you?

√ Urban area

Anything else you’d like to share that’s unique about the school?

We’re so lucky to be in Seattle, it’s beautiful here!


Brianna Marshall

This interview was conducted by Brianna Marshall, who is a second year dual-degree Master of Library Science and Master of Information Science student at Indiana University’s School of Library and Information Science. She is Managing Editor for Hack Library School and a 2012-2013 HASTAC scholar. Learn more about Brianna through her blog and portfolio or by following her on Twitter @notsosternlib

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Filed under Library School Career Center, MLIS Students, Urban area, Western US

Library School Career Center: LIU Palmer

Here is this week’s installment of the Library School Career Center feature, which is presented in partnership with the folks from the blog Hack Library School.  If you’re interested in library education, or in new ideas and the future of the profession, you should check it out.  


LIU Palmer 3

This interview is with Ellen Mehling, Director, Westchester Program and Internships, Palmer School of Library and Information Science, LIU Post.

Career Center Information

LIU Palmer 2

Who staffs the career center?

Career services (job hunting and career development) are provided by me [Ellen Mehling] for the Palmer School’s students and alumni. There is not an actual physical center; services are provided in various ways, online and face-to-face, one-on-one and in groups, for all Palmer School locations.

Are there “career experts” on staff? What are their credentials?

I’ve been an advisor on job hunting and career development for various groups including librarians/information professionals and library school students, for about eight years. I started in a former job, advising members of the general public and special populations who were seeking employment, and before long was being asked to teach workshops on the job search to other library professionals. In addition to my work at the Palmer School, I am Job Bank Manager and Career Development Consultant for the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO).

I’ve trained other librarians on assisting job hunting patrons, and have taught classes/workshops, moderated or spoken on panel discussions and conducted mock interviews and more, at various venues. I write regularly on job hunting/career topics for various sites, including METRO’s. I’ve served on hiring committees and have been a successful applicant myself in recent years too, so I’ve seen and experienced first-hand what works and what doesn’t.

Does the career center provide any of the following:

√ Resume/CV Review   √ Advice on writing cover letters
√  Interview Practice [mock interview]
√ General career advising
√  Other: Career Q&A on blog, webinars presentations/workshops (given by me), joint or guest presentations/workshops, recruiter visits, panel discussions, and full-day job hunting/career events. Some of these are open to students and graduates from other schools. I visit each of the Internship classes each semester to discuss resume writing. Palmer School students and alumni are also encouraged to make use of LIU’s Career Services in addition to the industry-specific career services provided by the School.

Do you provide in-person services?

√ Appointments
√ Speakers, or programs that present experts

Do you provide online services?

Website with resources    √  Blog   √ Webinars
√ Twitter: @LIUPalmerSchool
LinkedIn     √ Facebook
√ Other: Career / Job Hunting Q&A, “Kiosk” student listserv (anyone can subscribe to the listserv)

What do you think is the best way for students to use the career center?

Palmer School students and alumni contact me directly. Anyone can access the information on the blog and/or join the listserv or follow on Twitter, etc.

May alumni use career center resources?

Yes.

Are there any charges for services?

There is no charge.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using the career center?

We are always delighted to hear that our graduates have found positions. Three recent hires among our alumni: Library Media Specialist in the Elmont School District, Archives Technician at the National Archives at New York City, and Archives Coordinator for NY at Cartier.

Anything else you’d like to share with readers about your services in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

The job market is improving, but competition is still very strong, with many well-qualified applicants for each open position. Relevant skills and experience are necessary in addition to the degree, as are a strong network, patience, and a positive attitude. Students should start networking while they are still in school, and begin their job search before graduation.

LIU Palmer 1 March 5

Students’ Career Paths

Can you talk a little bit about the school’s approach to internships, practicums and/or volunteering?

A 120-hour internship is required for the Master’s degree students. It is usually done in the final semester. This benefits the students in a number of ways, including giving them experience to put on their resumes, and providing networking opportunities, both of which are crucial to job-hunting success. Students are encouraged throughout the program to get as much experience as they can, however they can, including volunteering, part-time jobs, project work etc.

Are there any notable graduates?

Bonnie Sauer at the National Archives at New York City
Caitlin McGurk at the Center for Cartoon Studies

LIU Palmer 4 March 5

Demographics

How many students in the library school?

Approximately 325.

What degree(s) do you offer?

MS in Library and Information Science
MS in Library and Information Science – School Library Media
PhD in Information Studies

Is it ALA accredited?

Yes.

What are the entrance requirements?

http://www.liu.edu/CWPost/Academics/Schools/CEIS/PSLIS/Graduate-Programs/MS-LIS/AdmisReq

When was the library school founded?

The Palmer School of Library and Information Science was established in 1959 on the LIU Post Campus of Long Island University. The Master of Science in Library Science was first accredited by the American Library Association in 1971. In 1992, the M.S. in Library Science was merged with the M.S. in Information Science and subsequently the name of the degree was changed to the M.S. in
Library and Information Science.

In 1995, the School began to offer the full accredited M.S. in Library and Information Science in Manhattan, and in 1997, the first class of students was admitted for the Doctor of Philosophy in Information Studies program.

Where are you?

√ Northeastern US

Where are you?

√ Urban area (NYC)
√ Suburban area (Long Island)

Anything else you’d like to share that’s unique about the school?

The Palmer School of Library and Information Science is one of the most distinguished schools of library and information science in the country. With three program locations throughout the New York metropolitan area as well as online and blended courses, the Palmer School offers a broad portfolio of degree and advanced certificate programs taught by a faculty of distinguished scholars, researchers and hands-on practitioners. We prepare our students for careers for a digital world and help them skillfully harness the way information is preserved, valued and delivered to every facet of society.

Aside from the internship requirement, the Palmer School is known for personalized one-on-one advisement and support throughout the time students are in the program. This continues even beyond graduation with the services available to alumni. The three campuses are LIU Post and LIU Brentwood on Long Island and in Manhattan at NYU’s Bobst Library. There is also a Dual Degree (Master’s) program, offered at the Manhattan location.


Brianna Marshall

This interview was conducted by Brianna Marshall, who is a second year dual-degree Master of Library Science and Master of Information Science student at Indiana University’s School of Library and Information Science. She is Managing Editor for Hack Library School and a 2012-2013 HASTAC scholar. Learn more about Brianna through her blog and portfolio or by following her on Twitter @notsosternlib

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Filed under City/town, Library School Career Center, MLIS Students, Northeastern US, Urban area