Tag Archives: Job interview

Have Opinions But Understand Other People Do as Well

http://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/387Photograph of Director of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library Josef C. James, 19713936187/This anonymous interview is with an Academic Librarian who has been a member of a hiring committee at a library with 0-10 staff members.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

Passion, adaptability, creativity.

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

Application packet: Inattention to detail, more than 2 page resumes/cover letters. Interview: inappropriate attire, being unprepared for the presentation (for an academic position), trash talking prior employers.

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Objective statement, personal philosophy of librarianship, “why this job is perfect for me” (rather than “why I’m the perfect candidate for the institution), generic cover letters not tailored to the position/institution.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

Some sense of their personality, but that’s more applicable to the cover letter.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ As many as it takes, but shorter is better

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√As many as it takes, but keep it short and sweet

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ .pdf

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ No

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ As an attachment only

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Be prepared, be interested in the work, know something about the institution. Convey your passion for the work the job will have you doing, be personable, have opinions but understand other people do as well. Be flexible and willing to learn from others.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

Being unprepared. Answering “I don’t know” to questions with which interviewees have no direct experience instead of applying previous life experiences to come up with possible answers. Babbling (typically due to nerves) and losing track of where they were going with an answer. Not having any questions when giving the chance to ask interviewers (or only asking about pay/benefits, etc.).

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

My experiences are based on previous employer. Current employer hasn’t had any openings since I joined.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

We know you’re nervous, but don’t let it destroy you — stay focused; we *really* want you to be The One who will end the search so that we can get back to work. If you make it to the in-person interview stage, understand that we liked your potential and if we don’t select you for the job, hold on to that knowledge and let it boost your self-confidence for the next job.

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, Academic, Original Survey

Strong Critical Thinkers Always Go to the Top of the List

Great Hall. View from the second floor west corridor. Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building, Washington, D.C. 2007This anonymous interview is with a librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring committee at a Special Library with 10-50 staff members.



What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

1)  Plain old smarts.  I want the absolute brightest and the best.  Those who are demonstrably strong critical thinkers always go to the top of the list.
2)  Idea people.  In my library, we always look for new and better ways to apply our skill set.  I want people who don’t just do the job assigned to them, but who understand the organization and constantly look to improve the service we provide.
3)  Strong communicators.  We strongly believe in being not just customer-focused, but also customer-facing.  Our staff are consistently pushed out of their working spaces to interact with customers on projects, teams, and in “embedded” roles.

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

In interviews, my number one no-no is bad-mouthing previous workplaces or former colleagues.  I want people who overcome challenges, not victims.  Tell me you’re here because you want to work with my team, not because you’re tired of carrying your colleagues’ slack or have a bad boss.
Take the time to research the company/organization you’re applying to join, including its history, purpose, and culture.  You don’t have to know EVERYTHING about it, but show me that you’ve chosen us for more than a paycheck.
Don’t over-inflate your accomplishments on your CV.  Be prepared to talk through details about your role and contribution in each case.  What exactly did you do to help achieve that goal, what problems did you encounter, how did you overcome them, etc?

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Buzzword-filled objective statements that don’t tell me anything.  Hobbies and interests.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

More than a list of accomplishments.  Something that demonstrates an ability to problem-solve.  Something that shows me you have strong leadership qualities, regardless of the type and/or level of the position.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Only one!

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ As many as it takes, but keep it short and sweet

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ No preference, as long as I can open it

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ I don’t care

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ As an attachment only

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Be clever, creative, personable, confident, and driven.  Speak clearly and directly.  Don’t rush – it’s ok to think about an answer to a question.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

Never cracking a smile.  Fidgeting and avoiding eye contact.  Speaking too softly to be understood.  Failing to have good, detailed examples of previous work.  Not taking notes.
Asking TOO many questions of me.  I want you to ask me questions, but don’t turn it into a reverse interview.  Some people will suggest that to you, but it is a real turn-off.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

The number of candidates for open positions has risen dramatically.  You really need to have a strong CV just to get into the screening process, and from there you’re up against a lot of very bright people.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

Make sure you know the job you’re applying for and want to do it.  Then show me how good you would be at it.
Don’t be afraid to apply for positions whose experience requirements are slightly beyond what you’ve done – the interview is where decisions are made.
Follow up after the interview by email – next day at the latest.  Keep it simple.  Don’t send a card in the mail.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Original Survey, Special

Don’t Ask Me Specific Numbers Regarding My Budget.

Reading Room, Elise Sandes Soldiers Home, Curragh Camp 1916This anonymous interview is with a Librarian who has been a hiring manager at a Special library with 0-10 staff members.
What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

Ability, passion for the work, flexibility

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

Command of English language
Perception of inability to perform tasks

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Unoriginal, bland

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Two is ok, but no more

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ Two is ok, but no more

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ Other: Company generated

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ I don’t care.

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Enthusiasm and perception of flexibility.  Something that shows me that candidate would *love* to work for our company.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

Much more automation at the start of the process.  Otherwise, interview portion remains much the same.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

Don’t complain about functions at a previous job that might come into play with my position.  Don’t ask me specific numbers regarding my  budget.

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, Original Survey, Special

Successes!

Library - Columbia. ca. 1910-1915This interview is with an Academic librarian who has been a hiring manager at a library with 50-100 staff members.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

Enthusiasm
Evidence of relevant accomplishments
Technology skills

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

A resume without a cover letter = instant dealbreaker
Not asking any questions in the interview is almost a dealbreaker

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Experience that’s not relevant to the position
Job descriptions rather than list of accomplishments
Claims to have done things that you can’t back up in the interview

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

Successes!

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Other: Depends on the position, but usually one

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ Two is ok, but no more

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ .pdf

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ No

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ I don’t care

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Demonstrate knowledge of our library and why you want to work here.  Show me how your past work/education/volunteering has prepared you for this gig.  If you haven’t done what we will need you to do, show me that you can learn.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

Don’t show enthusiasm or ask questions.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

It’s gotten much more structured


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Filed under 50-100 staff members, Academic, Original Survey

You May Want to Make Sure You Clean up Your Facebook Page

Huntington Free Library and Reading Room, ca 1920-1929This anonymous interview is with an Academic Librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring committee at a library with 50-100 staff members.

 

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

attitude, fit with the culture, attitude

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

Poor grammar,misspellings, addressing your letter to the wrong insitution, not linking your letter to the actual job description.
During the interview: Not asking thoughtful questions, not responding to a question when asked, being rude to staff and students.

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Padding!

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

This is not on your resume, but you may want to make sure you clean up your facebook page. It is something that may be looked at.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ As many as it takes, but shorter is better

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ Other: Depends on the position you are applying for

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ No preference, as long as I can open it

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ I don’t care

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ I don’t care

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

 Be genuine and show interest not just in the job but in what is going on at the library and institution. A good sense of humor.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

Talking too much when answering a question.  Not actually answering the question. It is also okay to say “I don’t know”.  Don’t lie.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

Very selective, it is not uncommon to have over 100 applicants. So, we can afford to be very picky about who we talk to on the phone.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

Relax and remember you are interviewing us as much as we are interviewing you. You need to remember you have to feel like you will like the institution, the people and your boss.  If you don’t feel that connection or there is something off, then figure out if it is a deal breaker.
Remember you can say no if offered a job! Saying yes when you have major doubts will  lead to unhappiness on both sides and possible termination/resignation a short time after starting.

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Filed under 50-100 staff members, Academic, Original Survey

A History of Steady Employment and/or School

The Reading Room, Public Library of NSW, 1942, by Sam Hood

 

 

This anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring committee at a library with 50-100 staff members.
What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

Tech skills,

communication skills,

a history of steady employment and/or school

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

Spelling errors, poor formatting (indicates either weak tech skills or that they don’t care about the job)

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Having an Objective–particularly a generic one–on your resume is pretty useless; use that space for something valuable.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

A submitted resume ought to be customized enough that it responds point-by-point to the stated requirements from the job announcement.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Only one!

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ Two is ok, but no more

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ .pdf

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ No

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ I don’t care

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Be smart. Know a bit about the library. Be willing to say “I don’t know, but this is how I’d find out,” instead of making up a lame answer.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

It’s slowed down a great deal. We used to do a lot more of it.

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Filed under 50-100 staff members, Original Survey, Public

I Look at and Enjoy Everything that They Include

Photograph of Archives Association Party for New Employees, Including George Allen Receiving Bowling Trophy from Dr. Wayne C. Grover as Meyer Fishbein Looks On, 1963This anonymous interview is with someone who is not a librarian.  This person works in an archives! S/he has been a hiring manager for a staff of 0-10.



What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

Good communication skills
Open-mindedness
Ability to thrive without structure / create their own

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

I once had an interviewee say “I really see myself here”. Confidence is great. Bravado is a turn-off.

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Errors. Obvious indications that you want to work in a different department but think Archives is a way in.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

No, but I look at and enjoy everything that they include.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ As many as it takes, I love reading

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ As many as it takes, but keep it short and sweet

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ No preference, as long as I can open it

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ Yes

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ I don’t care

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Show me how you think. Engage everyone in the room.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

I feel for people on the other end of the hiring process. It’s really challenging. However these are indicators of future problems:

* Answering questions in an emotional fashion.
* Showing a lack of respect for authority (if you can’t play nice in an interview, why do I want to be your boss?)
* Showing an interest in the setting, not the work

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

HR now helps more with pre-interviews but we approach the process and ask the same questions we did before.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

I want you to succeed. In order to do that, be your best self and be self-aware.

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, Archives, Original Survey

Tell Me That You’re Willing to Take on Any Challenge

Toby Willis-Camp

 

Toby Willis-Camp is a library management consultant.  She has worked as a library director for a professional association, where she was a hiring manager and a member of hiring committees.  Toby has focused her career on special libraries with experiences ranging from managing a toy library and family literacy centre to providing front line reference services at courthouse libraries.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

demonstrated ability to learn

willingness to ask questions and say “I don’t know”

sense of humour

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

any use of the word “holistic”

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

birthdates

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

favourite book

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Only one!

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ Two is ok, but no more

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ .pdf

 Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ No

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ Both as an attachment and in the body of the email

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

look me in the eye and have a firm handshake

tell me that you’re willing to take on any challenge

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

not knowing about the organization

not preparing any questions for the interviewer

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

If you get an interview, leave the piercings and stilettos with no stockings at home.  Dress professionally – this doesn’t necessarily mean a suit and a bun hairdo, but look sharp and clean. Men – wear a button down shirt with collar and cuffs, and polish your shoes, please.

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Filed under 0-10 staff members, Original Survey, Special

Library Managers are Actually Rooting for You to Do a Great Job and Wow Us

Colleen HarrisThis interview is with Colleen Harris, the Head of Access Services at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga’s Lupton Library, which has 10-50 staff members. You can read all about what a day there is like on her blog, Guardienne of the Tomes. In addition to her library work, she writes poetry. She has been a hiring manager and a member of hiring committees.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

1. Whether they fit the required and desired qualifications listed in the job ad.

2. Whether they fit with our library in terms of mission and vision, which we often learn in the cover letter, phone interview, or in person interview.

3. Someone who is willing not just to adjust to change but implement it, who is willing to speak up in their area of expertise and really engage with both library colleagues and campus.

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

1. Instant dealbreaker is if you do not have one of the required qualifications. We call them “required” for a reason, and it’s the first thing I use to cull the pool of applicants.

2. Sloppy cover letters are a big dealbreaker – misspellings, forgetting to swap out the last institution’s name for ours, citing the wrong job title, not using the cover letter to demonstrate how you would be a great match for my library team.

3. Another instant dealbreaker – if you list something as a skill in your cv or resume and then in the interview process demonstrate that you do not, indeed, possess that skill, that is a dealbreaker for me.

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Objective – your objective is to get the job I have open, I know that. You should be using that space to tell me something more useful, like your skillset, grants worked on, etc. You should also leave off marital status, church attendance, and hobbies unrelated to librarianship.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

Don’t just list the jobs you’ve had, note some of the accomplishments you’ve had in each position to give me some context for the work you did.

Also, list the dates of each position – just a list of positions without dates is not helpful.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Other: I don’t mind long cover letters, but they need to have a reason for being long. For instance – a long cover letter that is long because it bullet points the many required and desired qualifications from the job ad and succinctly addresses each but takes 2 1/2 pages is in a far better position than a cover letter of a single paragraph simply telling me of your interest in the job and asking me to see your cv. The cover letter serves two purposes – to help me get to know you in terms of fit, and to give me a quickie rendition of why you are qualified. Use it to your advantage.

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ As many as it takes, but keep it short and sweet

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ .pdf

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ No

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ As an attachment only

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Come prepared to discuss your skills and experience in the context of our job ad, and with ideas of how you can apply yourself to what my library wants to do. Be professional. Come prepared with questions for the library and search committee – candidates without questions probably have not done very much research on us. Demonstrate a high energy level.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

Demonstrating they have not done any research about our library or institution is the number one mistake; another common one is that people stray from the topic we ask them to address in their open presentation.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

The hiring process has not changed much – the makeup of the committee changes depending on the area of hire and who has available time to devote to a search.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

Job seekers should know that library managers are actually rooting for you to do a great job and wow us – we *want* to be impressed by you, and we *want* to hire you. Making yourself a stand-out candidate makes our jobs easier, particularly when wading through fifty or one hundred applications. We also want you to put as much time and effort into trying to impress us as we put into the search for a new colleague.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Original Survey

Further Questions: Why Is It Taking So Long?

This week I asked people who hire librarians to share anything they cared to about their hiring timelines, more specifically:

What are the different hiring stages at your organization and how long does each typically take?  What are the factors that can lengthen the process?  Is there ever a point in time when a candidate should attempt to check the status of an application?

Laurie PhillipsOn the different stages: First we develop the job description, search plan, and advertisements. That all has to be approved by the Dean and the Provost. When it is approved, we advertise in the Chronicle, on ALA Jobs, with library schools, and a few other places for about 4 weeks. We take about a week to review applications after the application deadline then meet to go through the applications together and decide who to phone/Skype interview. We take a week to phone and Skype, then use reference checks to make final decisions about who to bring to campus. Checking references also takes a week or so. At that point, we decide who to invite to campus (usually no more than 3 candidates). We contact them and give them a choice of dates – usually over a 2-3 week period starting two weeks from when we contact them (enough time to arrange travel). We usually meet within the week of the last candidate’s visit to decide on the successful candidate, with input from the Dean. Once we get the go-ahead from the Dean and the Provost’s office, we can make an offer.

On factors that lengthen the process: Availability/schedule of committee members, quirks of the spring academic/New Orleans calendar (Mardi Gras, Easter break, festivals, etc.).

On checking application status: If you need to know if you’re still a contender, then do, but it won’t make a difference. If we haven’t contacted you within a reasonable timeframe, you probably haven’t made it to the next round. Academic searches do take time, but we move fairly quickly through the stages once we get going. I had a candidate contact me before the application deadline to find out if the job had been filled. That indicates a completely lack of understanding of how academic searches work (and I had personally emailed each applicant to say that we would be reviewing applications after the deadline). I am currently right in the middle of campus visits and have had several emails from unsuccessful candidates. At this point, we aren’t going to change our minds and it’s a hassle for me to have to respond, but I understand the candidate’s anxiety about the process.

– Laurie Phillips, Associate Dean for Technical Services, J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library, Loyola University New Orleans

 

Since we hire on the basis of successful submission of MARC records, the major controlling factor is the time the candidate takes to complete the records.  Questions about how to prepare the records, which show a lack of knowledge concerning MARC coding, are a negative sign.  Our workload may at times slow sending of sample PDFs for cataloguing, and review of records, which we regret.   Little is to be gained by follow up in less than a month.

– J. McRee (Mac) Elrod, Special Libraries Catalouging

 

Colleen HarrisUpon an opening, the Library’s Management Council and any interested parties attend a meeting to discuss the open position, the needs of the library, and whether we want to do a straight refill of the position or change it to a different position. This can take up to four weeks.  Then we’re dependent on HR to sign off on the job posting, and it is posted for at least a week (staff) and usually 3-4 weeks (particularly for faculty librarian positions). At that point, the committee goes through the applications using a rubric to score each one and determine top candidates. That rubric, and the recommendations for the top candidates to phone interview, go to our dean and our Office of Equity and Diversity.

We phone interview anywhere from six to eight candidates per position; though they are 30 minute phone calls, they tend to stretch out over a week or three depending on travel schedules of committee members and trying to get a maximum number of committee members scheduled to attend, since we all have busy calendars. After that, again, a rubric is used to rank the candidates, which is sent to our dean and OED, with a recommendation for the top three candidates to invite to campus.

Interviews – once we get the okay from the dean and OED, we like to schedule them to give candidates at least a week and a half to two weeks to prepare (it’d be unfair to tell them they have to give us a 45 minute presentation, and that we’ll fly them in tomorrow). We have to schedule around vacations of important folks like the dean, committee chair, etc., and we try to get all three candidates (it’s usually three) in within a week or week and a half of each other. We solicit feedback from everyone via anonymous survey, the committee meets to hash things out, and the recommendation goes to the dean.

At that point, things become dependent on HR – we pass up our selections and reasoning, HR and the OED office sign off that there’s been no shady business or discrimination based on the justifications we give for each candidate, our dean makes a verbal offer, then things have to go “up the hill” to HR and University upper administration to be signed off on, which can take 2-3 weeks.

Only once all those signatures have been obtained is the contract letter written and sent to the candidate. Only once we get the signed letter back from the candidate do we inform  applicants that the job has been closed – this is why it can take so long to hear back if you haven’t been selected to interview.

We are one of the faster academic libraries I’ve worked at in terms of hiring, and it’s still a process that takes months. Take heart if you’re on the job hunt that because of this, being on the job search for a year or two is not at all out of the ordinary if you’re looking to work in an academic library.

– Colleen  S. Harris, Head of Access Services & Assistant Professor, Lupton Library,University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

 

Terry Ann LawlerOur municipality has a very lengthy process with regards to hiring.  On the back end, we have a long process involving lists of people who have applied in the past and are in a ‘pool’.  On the front end (where you care about it) the process is still fairly lengthy.
From interview day to actual start day can be over a month.  Because I have to justify the person I wish to hire, then call references, then ask for official permission to hire then finally contact the person and offer the job, it can take up to 2 weeks just to notify people that DIDN’T get the job.
There are times when I have started that process and for some reason had to back away from that candidate and go with a 2nd choice (so you can see why I don’t notify those who weren’t chosen first).   When that happens, it can add another 2 weeks to the process.
I understand that this can be very frustrating for hopefuls and I try to be as honest as possible about how long it will take me to contact someone.  But, knowing that the times can vary makes this hard to really do accurately.
Checking the status of your application can be tricky with my city as well.  Getting in the hiring pool gives you an automatic notification that your application has been accepted.  On the one hand, once you’re in the pool, anyone can call you for an interview when we have an opening.  That’s great news.  On the other hand, I might not have an opening for 6 months.  Not so good news.

Once you have actually had the interview, really it is just best to wait till you get notified.  If another job comes up and you really need a yes or no right away, then call the hiring supervisor and ask directly.  Otherwise, sit tight and once I jump through all of my organization’s flaming hoops, I’ll contact you.

– Terry Lawler, Assistant Manager and Children’s Librarian, Palo Verde Branch, Phoenix Public Library

 

Marge Loch-WoutersHiring Stages:

Accept applications (up to 2 months)

Winnow down to a top 20 (1 week)

Send essay questions (1 month)

Winnow down to a top 10 (1 week)

Brief skype interview with outside candidates (1 week)

Winnow down to 4-6 for final interview (1 week)

Reference Check 3 -7 days (depends on references availability)

Candidate offered position and subsequent negotiation or, if turned down, reaching out to next candidate for same – 1-2 weeks)

Emails out to non-successful candidates – 1 day

 Lengthening Factors:

Availability of primary manager (holidays/vacation/professional conference and meeting commitments all lengthen the search timeline)

Need to widen the pool of applicants or extend the application deadline if candidate pool doesn’t fit job

Having offers rejected and going down the line of candidates

Notification of non-consideration to ALL candidates is held until the job is finally filled

 When should candidates check:

If they have another job offer but prefer your institution

 What would be kind of us as hiring institution:

Sending a quick email update saying that the job search is still in process 6 weeks; 8 weeks; 10 weeks after the deadline

– Marge Loch-Wouters, Youth Services Coordinator, La Crosse (WI) Public Library

 

Thank you to my interviewees!

Please do share your own stories about hiring timelines in the comments – were you hired after six months of not hearing anything, for example, or are you a hiring manager who has to get six different signatures before sending an offer letter?  I’m interested in both applicant wait times and hiring librarians’ “flaming hoops.”
(By the way, if you are someone who hires librarians and are interested in participating in this feature, please email me at HiringlibrariansATgmail.  It is a very minimal infringement on your time, with no particular commitment for weekly participation on your part.)

 

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