Tag Archives: libraries

Don’t insist on a single “right” way to process every applicant

Goose hunting in Klamath County, Oregon, OSU Special Collections via Flickr CommonsThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for A year to 18 months. This person is looking in Academic library, Archives, Library vendor/service provider, Public library, School library, Special library at the Entry level and for positions Requiring at least two years of experience. This job hunter is in a City/Town in the Western US and is willing to move To a specific area.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

I’m looking within a geographically-targeted area for paraprofessional library openings that I feel match my qualifications. I want to be physically active on the job (i.e. shelving returns) and be able to walk or bike to work. In my ideal job, supervisors and colleagues would have collaborative relationships, and expectations would be communicated explicitly.

Where do you look for open positions? (e.g. ALA Joblist, professional listserv, LinkedIn)

Potential employers’ websites, professional listservs, ALA Joblist, LinkedIn

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I compose a cover letter for each position I apply to. I incorporate the job description’s language when describing my qualifications and addressing ways that I will contribute to the employer’s diverse workplace.

The application process for many library jobs is through a shared portal (i.e. NeoGov), which streamlines attaching certain files that are associated with my profile – letters of reference, degree and certificate, unofficial transcripts.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

√ Other: Invite me for an interview and offer me the job

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ The interview itself–how it’s conducted, the people i meet, etc.

√ Clear understanding of responsibilities

√ Potential relationship with supervisor and colleagues

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Look at barriers to hiring and employment and be open to solutions that eliminate those barriers. For example, to attract long-distance applicants, consider video interviews. Don’t insist on a single “right” way to process every applicant, or assume that everyone will perform essential functions in exactly the same way.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Look beyond superficial impressions that an applicant might present, recognizing that the job-application structure does not duplicate the work environment.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I hope the most significant factor is possessing the desired skills. A successful interview should establish the abilities of the job applicant. Beyond that, I think a lot depends upon the mindset and attitudes that have been brought together. Work and management styles, values held, even the other person’s “likability.”

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Archives, City/town, Entry Level, Job hunter's survey, Public, School, Special, Western US

Networking and knowing the right people is the secret of getting the job

Brian Hunter, 1984, Asst Librarian, Slavonic Collections, London School of Economics This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is not currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for more than 18 months . This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, Public library, Special library at the following levels: Entry level . This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

I had a nearly three-month internship for my MLS at a community college library and I currently volunteer in circulation at a public library coming close to one year.

This job hunter is in an Rural area, in the Southern US, and is not willing to move.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1-) A kind and collaborative environment.

2-) The ability to learn new skills and grow professionally.

3-) A living wage with benefits.

Where do you look for open positions?

Local and state government job sites, Indeed.com, state library job sites

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I usually use a recent cover letter and resume as a template, change the contact information, and address some of the job’s qualifications in the cover letter and resume.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ I do my best to tell the truth. I feel though that I may be exaggerating at times.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

√ Being able to present

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

I think being open and honest about the position, what it entails, and its salary and benefits is important to get the best job candidates. The less you say about the position, such as wage/salary, the more suspicious I am going to be about it.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Employers need to have a more humane application process. This means letting people know where their application is in the process. I want to know as early in the process as possible if I have a chance or if I need to move on. Hiring managers need to be clear exactly what information/documents/whatever they want submitted, particularly if applicants have to deal with clunky application tracking systems.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Networking and knowing the right people is the secret of getting the job. Volunteering is a particularly good strategy as you can gain skills and keep in touch with the profession while also developing a network that can inform you of upcoming or hidden jobs.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Archives, Job hunter's survey, MLIS Students, Public, Rural area, Southern US, Special

Communicate with your local library school

photo State Librarian James Stapleton and guests at the Book Week launch, Brisbane, ca. 1948 This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is not currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Public libraries, Special libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory, Senior Librarian. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

I had a very positive internship experience at Johnson & Wales before I graduated. My supervisors allowed me to attend meetings with other libraries, and experiment with instructional tools and chat reference. Soon I will be volunteering at a local historical society for archiving and historical library experience.

This job hunter is in a suburban area in the Northeastern US and is Hoping to stay in S. New England.

Where do you look for open positions?

OLIS Jobline, Massachusetts Board of Library Commisioners, Connecticut Library Jobs, HigherEd Jobs

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Only for certain kinds of employers

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I have a resume that is pre-designed, which I customize for certain positions, same with a cover letter. I usually spend no more than an hour preparing an application

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

 √ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Communicate with your local library school to set up PFE programs and set up a relationship with interns who might want to apply for jobs at your library

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Public, Special, Suburban area

Objectives. Please…no more.

Librarian working at the Pointe Coupee Parish Parish library in New Roads Louisiana in 1936This anonymous interview is with a librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring committee. This person works at a a public library with 200+ staff members.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

Customer service skills (soft skills are a lot harder to teach!), an eagerness to learn, and fit.

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

I had an interviewee come in wearing jeans. While that’s okay on a day-to-day basis, it was an instant turnoff for me in the interview. Otherwise, she would have been one of the top candidates!

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Objectives. Please…no more.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

I did like that one candidate explained her employment gap in her cover letter. Honestly, I didn’t notice until she pointed it out, but I appreciated the effort.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ As many as it takes, but shorter is better

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ Two is ok, but no more

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√.pdf

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√No

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√As an attachment only

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Complete answers with relevant examples. Elaborate, please! It’s okay to use an example from a non-library experience. We’re trying to get to know you to see if you would be a good fit.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

An interview is a sales pitch for yourself. Why should we hire YOU? Every single person I interviewed for our last position would have been hireable. Convince me that you’re the best fit. Notice how I keep mentioning “fit”.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

HR is much more involved. They make all the phone calls and do all the legwork. We just review the applications and participate in the interviews. That being said, make sure you get past HR so I can see your application! Make sure your application reflects the required experience.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

Writing skills matter. And please make sure you change your cover letter from job to job. I know you’re applying to other organizations, but it’s a major turn off to see that you didn’t care to change that information in your cover letter. One more thing – we can tell when you’re throwing your resume at everything just to see what sticks. If you apply to a job posting that closely matches what you have to offer, you’ll have a much greater chance of snagging an interview.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses to this survey.

If you’re someone who has participated in hiring library workers, take this survey and share your viewpoint.

Leave a comment

Filed under 200+ staff members, Original Survey, Public

We’ve stopped hiring completely since the Canadian dollar dropped

Employment Bus Interior by Flickr user Metro Transportation Library and ArchiveThis anonymous interview is with a librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring committee. This person works at an academic library with 100-200 staff members.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

1. Does the candidate meet the qualifications listed in the job posting 2. For academic postings, is this person contributing to librarianship through scholarship, service, etc. 3. Does this person fit the dynamic of our library

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

Desperation. Listen, I’ve been desperate, I know what it’s like. I know it’s unavoidable. But it is possible to not let your desperation show. This is key. For example, if I see that you’ve applied to my library to be a project archivist, a data entry clerk, a cataloger, a liaison librarian and an Associate University Librarian, all in the span of a few months, I’m sorry but I don’t want to hire you for any of them. How am I supposed to know which of those things is actually _your_ thing, and which are the ones you’d be willing to settle for? I’ve also interviewed someone who, at the end of the interview, said she really wanted to start a job ASAP because she was running out of money. I need to know that you want to work here because the job is a good fit, not because you’ll take any library job any old where at this point.

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Unexplained gaps in time. Typos. For student hires, I’m tired of seeing, “I’m really excited to apply to work at the campus bookstore.” The word “passion”

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

Information based on the job posting. I hire based on the posting. If the requirements stated in the posting aren’t glaringly obvious in your resume, I have to take a longer time to parse through your application package to find them. If I have a stack of 100 resumes for one position and I can’t figure out if you have an MLIS + 3 years of experience in 20 seconds or less, I’m moving on. I think people (falsely) assume that everywhere has some type of HR software that is vetting resumes. That may be true some places, but not where I work. I am literally going through every resume, and not all of them have MLISs – or have even worked in a library. I need to be able to at least tell you apart from those people.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Only one!

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ 3 or fewer for support staff. As many as it takes for academics.

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ .pdf

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ I don’t care

If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ I don’t care

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

Be genuine and know your stuff. I hire for technical services, and I can tell when someone doesn’t give a crap about cataloging. Give a bunch of craps. Be genuine.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

Bringing a cup of coffee. Not dressing well. Sometimes when we ask about why a person would be a good fit for a job they really end up telling me why the job is a good fit for them. Not the same thing.

How has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

We’ve stopped hiring completely since the Canadian dollar dropped. NB: We’re a Canadian library.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

Job seekers, please stop e-mailing me asking about job opportunities. When something comes up it will be posted. If it isn’t posted it doesn’t exist. I work in the public sector, I can’t not post a job when one becomes available.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses to this survey.

If you’re someone who has participated in hiring library workers, take this survey and share your viewpoint.

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Filed under 100-200 staff members, Academic, Original Survey

set up a relationship with interns who might want to apply for jobs at your library

Digital ID 434250. Girls in classroom, Traveling Library at Public School Playground July 1910.. Hine, Lewis Wickes Photographer. 1910This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Public libraries and Special libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory, Senior Librarian. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

I had a very positive internship experience at Johnson & Wales before I graduated. My supervisors allowed me to attend meetings with other libraries, and experiment with instructional tools and chat reference. Soon I will be volunteering at a local historical society for archiving and historical library experience.

This job hunter is in a rural area, in the  Northeastern US, and isHoping to stay in S. New England.

Where do you look for open positions?

OLIS Jobline, Massachusetts Board of Library Commisioners, Connecticut Library Jobs, HigherEd Jobs

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Only for certain kinds of employers

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I have a resume that is pre-designed, which I customize for certain positions, same with a cover letter. I usually spend no more than an hour preparing an application

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Communicate with your local library school to set up PFE programs and set up a relationship with interns who might want to apply for jobs at your library

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under Academic, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Public, Rural area, Special

I love meeting employers at job fairs

Christchurch libraryThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in  Archives, Public libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

I have been the only corporate librarian at an organization for the last two years. I also have experience through internships at archives and special libraries.

This job hunter is in an urban area, in the Northeastern US, and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

A commitment to serving a diverse set of users. A competitive salary and benefits package. A dedication to invest in staff’s professional development.

Where do you look for open positions?

Professional listservs, national and state association listservs, LinkedIn.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I look over the job description and highlight areas that I am acquainted with. If I have had these responsibilities at a previous job/internship, I make sure to highlight that in my resume. If I do not have direct experience, I try to speak about educational background in these areas in my cover letter.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

I love meeting employers at job fairs and encourage employers to attend. It is a great opportunity for candidates to get a feel for the culture of an organization and decide whether or not the organization is right for them.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Communication is key. When we are balancing other applications/interviews, it is good to know whether you are still in the running for a position.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I am a big believer that a good match in culture will likely lead to getting hired.

 

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under Archives, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Public, Urban area

When I open my saved bookmarks, Google Chrome asks me if I’m sure I want to open that many

Librarian working at the Pointe Coupee Parish Parish library in New Roads Louisiana in 1936This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, at the following levels: Entry level. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

As an intern, I worked for two years in reference and instruction in a large academic library, and for a little over a year in a special library.

This job hunter is in an city/town, in the Southern US,  and is willing to move within the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic region.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

I’m looking for something that will allow me to grow professionally, something that will allow me to have an impact on the organization/institution/community, and something with a high enough salary to allow me to pay off my student loans.

Where do you look for open positions?

When I open my saved bookmarks, Google Chrome asks me if I’m sure I want to open that many…ALA Joblist, library associations for the states I’m open to, INALJ, LisList, professional listservs, the jobs email list for my library school.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I usually print off the job description so that I can annotated it, and I do a little research on the institution/library to see what kind of place it is. Then I go to my collection of resumes and cover letters and see if anything that I’ve written before matches the job description. If so, I tweak those documents to fit the job description. Depending on how much tweaking needs to be done, I probably spend about 5-6 hours on each application, usually over the course of 3-4 days.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: I have been a bit vague sometimes, but haven’t lied.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Being able to present

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

I think they should write clear job descriptions – don’t rely on jargon to fill it up. Advertise the job widely on listservs and job boards. Post the salary range. Don’t make candidates jump through a ton of hoops to apply (cover letter! resume! reference letters in advance! official copies of transcripts! teaching philosophy/statement on __________! oh, and please mail it all to us!).

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Be as timely as you can – I’m applying to academic libraries, and there is really no good reason that a hiring process should take 6 months from job posting to offer being made. Communicate with applicants to appraise them of where the search committee is in the hiring process. I actually prefer when communication goes through HR or someone other than someone on the search committee – the process seems to go more smoothly, for some reason.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I haven’t been hired for a full-time position yet, but I think it’s a combination of a lot of factors. To start with, I think you need to have relevant experience/education, and then present yourself well in your application materials. But then there’s a certain level of luck/chance – what jobs are available and who else is applying for them. You may apply for and interview well for a job that you’re well qualified for, but you still may not get the job because another candidate was even more qualified than you.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Southern US

If you have no intention of hiring an outsider (or insider) don’t have them go through the process.

Library in United States National Museum BuildingThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Public libraries, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory, Department Head. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

I’ve been in the field for nearly nine years, but my internship was the most valuable experience of my graduate education.

This job hunter is in an city/town, in the Western US, and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Community engagement, appropriate staffing (good leadership to front-line staff ratio), good morale in front-line staff.

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist, INALJ, Indeed

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Depending on the position, I’ll spend 2-5 hours per listing.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Take personal preferences and prejudice out of the equation.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

If you have no intention of hiring an outsider (or insider) don’t have them go through the process.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

If I knew that, I wouldn’t be looking right now 🙂

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

2 Comments

Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Public, Western US

I’m only applying to federal jobs and public colleges and universities where the salary range is usually posted.

Geraldine Fain Browses in the Free LibraryThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries and Federal  libraries, at the following levels: Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory. This job hunter is in a city/town, in the Southern US, and is searching for work in a particular city.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

In no particular order: A place that supports professional development. A place where I don’t mind coming to work every day. A place that pays me well enough to sustain myself and pay off my student loans.

Where do you look for open positions?

Various listservs (the good jobs are usually posted on them the aggregator sites like INALJ.) State Library Association website Employer’s website Indeed INALJ USA Jobs

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other: I’m only applying to federal jobs and public colleges and universities where the salary range is usually posted.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I read the job description several times to make sure that I meet most (if not all) of the qualifications. I have several resumes and CVs that I work from, so I usually customize one of them for the position to which I’m applying. Since I’m working full time, it often takes me a week or two to finish an application packet.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary
√ Being able to present
√ Other: How knowledgeable the search committee is about the position. I went to one interview where the search committee head could hardly answer my questions.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

I work in academia so I know the hiring process can be glacial. I just ask to be kept in the loop about my status as a candidate.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Meeting the job qualifications, developing a rapport with the search committee, and presenting yourself well.

For some context, take a look at the most recently published summary of responses.

Are you hunting for a new LIS job? Take the survey! http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibJOBHUNTERsurvey

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

 

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Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Southern US