Tag Archives: library interviews

Your Help Needed: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Can you put the crowd in crowdsourced?  The Interview Questions Repository and Crowdsourced Resume/CV review need your help to continue to thrive!  Here’s the low down on these two job hunting resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Crowdsourcing Reminder: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Please share this post.  These Crowdsourced resources need your help in order to draw crowds and be better resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Crowdsourcing Reminder: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Please share this post.  These Crowdsourced resources need your help in order to draw crowds and be better resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Crowdsourcing Reminder: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Please share this post.  These Crowdsourced resources need your help in order to draw crowds and be better resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Crowdsourcing Reminder: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Please share this post.  These Crowdsourced resources need your help in order to draw crowds and be better resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Crowdsourcing Reminder: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Please share this post.  These Crowdsourced resources need your help in order to draw crowds and be better resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Crowdsourcing Reminder: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Please share this post.  These Crowdsourced resources need your help in order to draw crowds and be better resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Crowdsourcing Reminder: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Please share this post.  These Crowdsourced resources need your help in order to draw crowds and be better resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Crowdsourcing Reminder: Interview Questions Repository and CV or Resume Review

Please share this post.  These Crowdsourced resources need your help in order to draw crowds and be better resources.

Resource #1:

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

Top tip: Switch the spreadsheet to list view, in order to be able to limit by answers – you can choose to only look at the phone interviews at public libraries, for example.

Bottom tip: For respondents, you should be able to edit your answers, if you think of something to add, etc.

You will also always be able to find these links in the sidebar to your right —>

If you think a repository of questions  that people have been asked in library interviews is a useful tool, please help keep it dynamic and relevant by sharing this post with at least one person today.  Thanks!

Resource #2

Are you interested in getting a lot of eyes on your resume or CV?

Sounds like you could use Hiring Librarians’ crowdsourced Resume/CV review, For Public Review.

Here’s how it works:

We’ll post resumes or CVs, and invite the public to respond with their feedback in the Comments section.  We’ve got a few ringers – people who hire librarians – who have agreed to regularly review and comment.  However, anyone and everyone on the internet will also be able comment (respectfully – we will do our best to moderate attacks and insults).

We will post resumes or CVs from any LIS job hunter who submits one. However, he or she must agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes/CVs.

To have your resume or CV posted,

  • First take a look at the comments on previously posted resumes/CVs, and see if any would apply to yours.  Edit if necessary.
  • Then send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and…
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.

*YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable, submit your resume/CV today, comment on other posted resumes/CVs, and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

irish women's workers union

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

Further Questions: What’s the Best Way to Practice for Interviews?

This week’s question is again inspired  by a reader.  Thanks to this and all of the rest of you readers for being inspiring!

I asked people who hire librarians:

It seems a bit wrong to apply and go through the interview process when not interested in a job, but how else can one get practice interviewing?  Toastmasters and public speaking classes are helpful but not quite the same skills required for a presentation and interview – talking about oneself, and thinking on one’s feet.  Any suggestions for gaining the skills to really impress you in an interview? 

Cathi AllowayIdeas:  Ask friends and families to practice interviewing with you, even if they are outside the library field.  They can at least practice a mini-interview if this is a daunting favor for them.  Find out if they have had any good or bad interview experiences, from either side of the desk.

           Practice eating out with strangers, if you can.  If you have a chance to attend a social event that forces you to mix, mingle, and do small talk with people you don’t know, it helps you practice how to think on your feet and have the appropriate etiquette for an interview setting.

           Use your alma mater’s career center.  All of the MLS or MIS programs should allow you access, as an alum, to a career center where they have resources to help you practice.
           Try to book a non-interview meeting with a library director or supervisor.  I did this early in my career to explore options as my family was considering an out-of-town move.  I would ask questions such as:  “Where do libraries post vacancies when they have them?  What are some of the best libraries I can try to work for?  Are there any I should avoid due to under-funding or mismanagement?  Are there non-profits in the area that would be a good fit for me?  What is like to live/work in this neighborhood/area?”  These pre-move interviews ended up resulting, down the line, in jobs.
            Contact your state library organization (hopefully you are a member) and see if there are mentors and/or library supervisors willing to practice interviews.
– Catherine Alloway, Director, Schlow Centre Region Library

Both my department and our library as a whole are chronically understaffed; if I discovered we had spent staff time considering and interviewing a candidate who had no intention of taking the position, it would really frustrate me—and ruin that person’s chance of ever interviewing with me again.  The time spent going over resumes and applications, ranking the candidates, and shuffling staff schedules so the committee can be together for a few hours to conduct interviews is a big investment of staff time on the part of the library; those are hours I could have spent doing collection development, creating programming, helping at the reference desk, or training the person we actually hire.

If someone at my library or in my area wanted to practice interview with me at another time—lunch, the weekend, etc.—I’d be happy to look at his/her resume, give the interview questions, and say how that person would have stacked up in the final ranking.  Something informal like this would probably be much better for the interviewee, anyway: I’d be looking specifically at how they answered the questions instead of focusing on if the person is right for me/the job/my library; the feedback would be immediate instead of after a week or more when we are done with all the interviews.

– Anonymous

Laurie PhillipsAbsolutely do not go through the interview process just for the practice. We are all busy professionals and please do not waste our time if you’re not interested in the job. To prepare for the interview, ask your placement office for commonly asked interview questions or ask professionals for their list. But, if the interviewers are doing their jobs well, they should be asking you questions about how you fit the qualifications. Look at the qualifications and the environment. How would you illustrate your qualifications? For example, if they mention a collaborative environment, be prepared to talk about projects or work you have done in collaboration with others and how you handled the group dynamic. If you can only talk about work you’ve done by yourself, the committee will notice. Do this exercise for each of the qualifications stated in the ad. Maybe even use ads for jobs you haven’t applied for as practice.

– Laurie Phillips, Associate Dean for Technical Services, J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library, Loyola University New Orleans

This advice could be generalized but I am writing it from the perspective of a public library administrator. Look online and in books for really tough questions. Practice interviewing with a friend. If that friend is also a library professional or even a manager in another field, all the better.

Also, scour a library’s website and look for clues about what the institution values. And do not neglect looking for the library’s budget online.  Think about how things are allocated. Think about questions that you could be asked based on what you see in the library’s online presence and in the library’s budget.  This research will also likely help you generate thoughtful questions of your own.

– Christy Davis, Library Director, Klamath County Library Service District 

I’m not opposed to applicants going through the interview process unless they absolutely, positively know they don’t want the job. But if they aren’t sure or just don’t think they want the job I don’t have any problem with them interviewing. A good interview or learning more about a particular position can change someone’s mind. It’s also good networking, for both sides, assuming the person is interviewing within his/her area of professional interest.
As for your second question, about interviewing skills, there are no Secrets to Getting a Job Offer. A good interview depends on so many factors that I’m not sure where to begin. I’m also more likely to be critical of the employer’s interviewing skills than of the interviewee’s skills, unless the latter is blatantly flaunting rules of common courtesy. Nervousness, the wrong socks, a little late, etc. are not grounds for crossing someone off a potential hire list. I also encourage applicants to contact the interviewer(s) afterward to find out why there wasn’t a job offer. My tips: Preparation, preparation, preparation. Read and reread the job description, prepare answers to potential questions, and focus, focus, focus on the job you are interviewing for, not the job you want it to be.
– Laura J. Orr, Law Librarian, Washington County Law Library
J. McRee Elrod
I agree it is wrong.
I would suggest asking a mentor to practice with you.
– J. McRee (Mac) Elrod, Special Libraries Catalouging

Thinking about it, I’m not sure how helpful practice interviews really are. From a public library perspective, which is the kind of atmosphere we have. Practicing presentations for a tenure-track academic position is different. But we’ve certainly hired people who were nervous and stumbled and generally uncomfortable. And we’ve rejected plenty who were confident and polished. It’s the content of the answers, not the presentation.

There are specific kinds of answers that are certainly count against a candidate, such as going off on a tangent about a total jerk supervisor. But since you’re never going to be told what those bad answers were, I don’t know how doing extra interviews will help.

– Kristen Northrup, Head, Technical Services & State Document Depository, North Dakota State Library

This is how I look at jobs I interviewed for where I did not get the job offer!

Unfortunately, the interview is the best practice, but, if you can find a mentor who is willing to practice with you, or find a friend from library school and you can help each other practice. Find some interview questions online and just start running through them. I have also heard of individuals practicing in front of a mirror, but I haven’t tried that myself. If you can go to professional conferences, network, meet hiring managers, and ask them what kinds of questions they ask at their interviews. Most of us will be willing to dish out a few questions you could practice with.

As far as a job presentation, you can practice on your own, but it is always best to get a few friends who will be honest with you and give you pointers for improvement.

– Julie Leuzinger, Department Head, Eagle Commons Library, University of North Texas Libraries

We only invite for interviews candidates in whom we have a real interest, and expect that the candidates we invite only accept if they have a genuine interest in our organization.  We will know if you are just using us for practice, and won’t like it.  Should you ever apply for a position here that youare interested in we will remember, and your application will not be seriously considered.  If you aren’t really interested in a position you won’t be convincing in an interview anyway, so the approach seems of questionable value even were it not of questionable integrity.

What impresses me in an interview is the person, not the slickness of a presentation.  It’s not about self-promotion on the candidate’s side, or ambush questions on the interviewer’s side.  It’s about making meaningful connections between the organization’s needs and a candidate’s experience and qualities.

Being thoroughly prepared is critical to your success in an interview.  Learn all you can about the position and the organization, and think about what you learn in relation to your experience and who you are as a person.  Get sample interview questions from the web and write out answers to them; the process of writing will help you articulate your ideas and sharpen your insights.  Then read and re-read those answers – perhaps even aloud – add to them, refine them, and get comfortable with them so you have some practiced language to use at interview time.  Read some articles, attend webinars or other professional development events, and talk to colleagues about your ideas to give you practice expressing them and get you more actively engaged with current issues and trends. You might also get a friend to do a practice interview with you; wear your good outfit, sit in an unfamiliar office, and treat it very formally.

All of this can help make what you know and believe and have done come to mind more readily and fluently when you are thinking on your feet, make you more confident and persuasive, and demonstrate that you are serious about the work and the particular position.  I want to hire someone who has ideas, who thinks, who cares, and who has a good work ethic; those qualities will impress me, self-promotion or showmanship will not.

– Ann Glannon, Associate Director, Wheelock College Library, Boston, MA

Thank you as always to our contributors for their time and insight.  If you’re someone who hires librarians and are interested in participating in this feature, please email me at hiringlibrariansATgmail.com.

Thank YOU for reading! My heart is fine, fine, lonely comments.

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