Tag Archives: LIS careers

For Public Review: Quinlisk

Welcome to crowd-sourced resume review for LIS job hunters!

Please help the job hunter below by using the comment button to offer constructive criticism on her resume. Some guidelines for constructive feedback are here, and the ALA NMRT has brief tips for reviewing resumes here.

This 2 page resume was submitted by a job hunter who says,
I am a recent graduate who is looking for a position as a cataloging or metadata librarian. This resume is for an entry-level position in a public library, though I am more than willing to accept a position in an academic or special library if one is available.
Quinlisk-Resume-1 Quinlisk-Resume-2

To submit your resume or CV For Public Review,

  • send it as a Word document, PDF, PNG or JPEG to hiringlibrariansresumereviewATgmail.
  • It will be posted as-is, so please remove any information that you are not comfortable having publically available (I suggest removing your address and phone number at a minimum).
  • Please include a short statement identifying if it’s a resume or CV and
  • describing the types of positions you’re using it for (ie institution type, position level, general focus).
  • Finally, you will also need to confirm that you agree to comment on at least five other posted resumes.
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Filed under CV review, For Public Review, Resume Review

Dear Crowds, Please check out the Interview Questions Repository!

Have you been on a library interview recently?  Or are you prepping for one?

Sounds like you could use The Interview Questions Repository!

If you’ve had a library interview recently, help this resource grow by reporting the questions you were asked:

http://tinyurl.com/interviewquestionsform

or by sharing this link widely with your friends and colleagues.

If you are about to go on an interview, use the spreadsheet:

http://tinyurl.com/InterviewQuestionsRepository

to help you prepare.

People have recorded questions from more than 300 interviews! But remember, *YOU* are the value of this resource.  To help keep it valuable and current, submit your questions and share this post widely!

Thanks, as always, for reading and contributing!

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News and Administration

The less you need the job, the more likely you are to be hired.

Housewives league at Wash. MarketThis anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee, a human resources professional, library director, mentor, and someone who has recently been hired and hired others. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

All types, including reference/information professionals

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an area that is a mix of rural and factory town in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Qualified to do the job as described with nothing more than specific location training.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

The applications were evaluated by the Library Director, the assistant director, a staff person in the department, and an outside party who would be working regularly in the department.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Lack of qualifications. The “I like books and kids, I can do that job” mentality.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: If asked.

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Be qualified for the job you are applying for–read the description, learn about the area and the library to which you are seeking employment. Be as picky as you can. If you apply to a place where you don’t want to go–it shows. If you have personal baggage from a previous position still are tough about it–it shows.

I can’t fix that in an applicant.

I hate to write this, but the less you need the job, the more likely you are to be hired.

This means: operate from a position of strength, try and be at least OK with you current situation, be confident in your answers, even if you think that is not what the interviewer wants to hear.

I want to hire someone who is

Friendly

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Other: 5-6

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Other: 1-2

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

No. And getting education on the job can be an issue.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

Because the profession is dynamic, and is more about the contents of the materials that the materials themselves. As the profession changes–learns the vocabulary of the age it was waiting for–we will be the curators and the information keepers and navigators for future generations who don’t understand how the best tools for their tasks are created, let alone where they are located.

That is what we do.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, City/town, Midwestern US, Public, Rural area, State of the Job Market 2015

no red flags in their application (positive recommendations, no disciplinary/criminal issues).

Fruit and vegetable vendors, Pike Place Market, Seattle, WashingtonThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Subject Liaisons, Data Management Librarians

This librarian works at a library with 100-200 staff members in a suburban area in the Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 26-50 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

Possessed all of the required qualifications, some of the preferred, and had no red flags in their application (positive recommendations, no disciplinary/criminal issues).

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

Applications are weeded by HR if they don’t contain all the required components. The search committee is 4-5 faculty and we use a rubric based upon the requirements listed in the job advertisement.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

They lacked the recommended qualifications.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Yes

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Make sure that each qualification is addressed, there are no typos or errors in the essay, and that the applicant treats it seriously and professionally.

I want to hire someone who is

curious

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 100-200

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 5-6

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are more positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ I don’t know

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

No experience required.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 100-200 staff members, Academic, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Suburban area

lack of professional positions for graduates

Clothes Market, but where Kildare TownThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Archivists, Technical Services, Deans, Reference, Public Services

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Northeastern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Meet the qualifications of the position.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

a search committee looks at the coverletters and resumes and votes yes/no/maybe to determine if they person is brought in for an interview.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

lack of experience

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

prove they have experience in the cover letter and resume. Use keywords from job posting so committee members see you have experience.

I want to hire someone who is

competent

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 7 or more

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

yes, official requirement even for library school interns.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ Yes

Why or why not?

lack of professional positions for graduates.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Northeastern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area

If we fill positions with those who insist on holding the profession back they will be the last generation of librarians.

Astor Market - Demonstrating CoffeeThis anonymous interview is with a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Children’s librarians

This librarian works at a library with 0-10 staff members in a rural area in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Telling me that they have the qualifications or experience that are listed as “required” in the posting for the opening.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

Applications come directly to me, the library director. I evaluate them, using my own rubric (a list of the minimum qualifications). Those who meet all/most are shared with a committee who use thier own rubric to share with me (individually) those they think would be a good fit for our team.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Not helping me understand why they believe they are qualified for the position I have advertised. After looking at a cover letter, application, and resume if I can’t see the degree/credentials or experience listed in my posting they are disqualifed.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: if requested by the applicant

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Present themselves professionally from the very first communication.

I want to hire someone who is

personable

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 0-10

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 1

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

No

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

If we can fill our position with friendly, outgoing, dynamic professionals who understands that the future of their profession is going to be very different but still very challenging and gratifying will make ALL the difference. If we fill positions with those who insist on holding the profession back they will be the last generation of librarians.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

Help me, hire you! I want to hire you but I need to see your passion and qualifications on the first documents you send me.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

1 Comment

Filed under 0-10 staff members, Midwestern US, Public, Rural area, State of the Job Market 2015

In fact, I was hired without any library experience

Market before PassoverThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee and a Department Chair (independently reviews candidates). This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

We hire multiple positions with varying specialties. At our institution, all librarians are subject liaisons and all of us are required to perform reference work, but beyond that we do specialize in various areas (e.g. sciences, education, instruction).

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a rural area in the Northeastern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 26-50 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

There are a couple criteria: one, meeting the minimum requirements specified in the job description (we are not permitted to consider candidates who do not meet specified minimums), and two the level of “fit” to the duties of the position (in terms of previous similar experience, accomplishments in areas we’re looking for, and so forth).

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

There are a few steps in the process.

First, applications are evaluated by the search committee; we use an online application system. HR does not weed out candidates prior to the search committee review. Subsequently, the search committee conducts telephone interviews and reference checks, and finally the candidate has an interview on-site. During the interview, they meet with the search committee and several other groups, all of whom provide written evaluations using a simple rubric.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Failure to meet specified requirements (for example, if the job description specifies a minimum of 2 years experience in academic librarianship, that is a hard and fast rule–if the candidate can’t demonstrate that, they cannot be considered for the position at all).

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Well, there are two things to consider. For first-pass hirability, where I work the candidate (as mentioned) needs to meet the minimum requirements. However, that’s more or less a “yes/no” situation.

In the interviews, though, the most hirable candidates are those who can engage with the committee, provide concrete examples of their accomplishments and how they make the candidate ideal for the position. A candidate who can highlight what they have that they think no other candidate can offer is definitely a strong contender for the position.

I want to hire someone who is

adaptable

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are fewer positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

The experience requirements vary by job; generally experience is preferred even for a position that might be considered “entry level,” but it’s not an official requirement for those just starting out (in fact, I was hired without any library experience).

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ I don’t know

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

Leave a comment

Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Northeastern US, Rural area, State of the Job Market 2015