Tag Archives: lis jobs

Ask about a typical day, ask what opportunities exist for advancement

Ryan McCrory is a historian of European Intellectual History with over 20 years of library experience in academic and public libraries, as far-flung as the University of Washington Libraries, Seattle Public Library, and Lititz Public Library.  

He is active in a variety of library organizations, and also serves on the Board of Directors of Hosting Solutions and Library Consulting.

Briefly describe the hiring process at your organization and your role in it:

Post job ad, receive and read applications, contact prospective candidates for interviews, interview and evaluate, make job offer. I do or assign each of these steps.

Titles hired include: Circulation Supervisor, Circulation Clerk, Maintenance

Who makes hiring decisions at your organization:

√ Other: Executive Director

Which of the following does your organization regularly require of candidates?

√ Online application

√ Resume

√ References

Does your organization use automated application screening? 

√ No

Think about the last candidate who really wowed you, on paper, in an interview, or otherwise. Why were they so impressive?

Clearly articulated why they were interested in this particular job and had a clear understanding of what the job actually was.

Do you have any instant dealbreakers?

No

What do you wish you could know about candidates that isn’t generally revealed in the hiring process?

Does their work match their words

How many pages should each of these documents be?

Cover Letter: √ Two is ok, but no more

Resume: √ As many as it takes, but keep it reasonable and relevant

CV: √ We don’t ask for this

What is the most common mistake that people make in an interview?

Try to say what they think is wanted, instead of just speaking honestly.

Do you conduct virtual interviews? What do job hunters need to know about shining in this setting?

We could, but we haven’t had the need. Make sure they test out the audio before the interview. If I can’t hear them effectively, I’m not going to remain engaged well enough to give them a proper interview

How can candidates looking to transition from paraprofessional work, from non-library work, or between library types convince you that their experience is relevant? Or do you have other advice for folks in this kind of situation?

Make me understand that they have people skills, can work with many types of people, are adaptable when necessary, and can think on their feet effectively.

When does your organization *first* mention salary information?

√ It’s part of the job ad

What does your organization do to reduce bias in hiring? What are the contexts in which discrimination still exists in this process?

We are in a pretty homogenous area, so we don’t attract a lot of diversity. I think even prospective employees would have a hard time seeing themselves as working for us – we probably don’t appear as inclusive as we are. I don’t have an easy answer to fix that, but do try and make sure that our programming and collections give the sense that we are open to all.

What questions should candidates ask you? What is important for them to know about your organization and the position you are hiring for?

Ask about a typical day, ask what opportunities exist for advancement. Ask how we would view someone not looking for advancement. Ask questions that would let them know what they are in for.

Additional Demographics

What part of the world are you in?

√ Northeastern US

What’s your region like?

√ Suburban

√ Rural

Is your workplace remote/virtual?

√ Other: Not really. There may be occasions for it, but very few

How many staff members are at your organization?

√ 11-50

Author’s note: Hey, thanks for reading! If you like reading, why not try commenting or sharing? Or are you somebody who hires Library, Archives or other LIS workers? Please consider giving your own opinion by filling out the survey here.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Northeastern US, Other Organization or Library Type, Rural area, Suburban area

Further Questions: How did you learn to hire people?

Each week (or thereabouts) I will ask the same question to a group of people who hire library and LIS workers. If you’d like to be part of this group, shoot me an email at hiringlibrariansATgmail.

This week’s question is:

How did you learn to hire people? What did you learn through formal training versus through mistakes, mentoring, or some other method? Are there trainings or tools you would recommend?


Photo of Celia after finishing a marathon first in her age group. She wears an orange shirt and has a medal

Celia Rabinowitz, Dean of Mason Library, Keene State College: I love this question! This is so not something that any of us learns in library school (at least I didn’t) and that might actually be more useful than some of the management topics we did cover (granted, I went to library school in 1991-1992 so a few things have changed).

Most of what I have learned has come from a combination of the experiences of being a candidate myself, being a member of a search committee, and chairing a search committee. I did not receive any formal training beyond the obligatory sessions with Human Resources staff that are a part of every search I have done. That work focuses primarily on issues around consistent and equitable process, reminders about what kinds of questions are illegal to ask, and now attention to DEI commitments.

My strongest recommendation is to find opportunities to participate on search committees. They can be a lot of work but it is rewarding and an important contribution to the life of your organization. If you have the chance to be on a committee for a department completely outside the library, take it, and that includes searches for very senior administrative positions. These are really great opportunities to get to know coworkers and the process. Then – remember that this process is really much more an art than a science. We have all experienced wonderful candidate visits, a successful hire, and then a struggle with a colleague who does not turn out to be what we expected. And most of us have wondered if that candidate with the dismal interview experience might really turn out to be just who we need.

I don’t have training or tools to recommend. I do encourage thinking about what questions you have for candidates that you think will really help you understand them and give them some insight to the organization they are interested in joining. In my experience, search committee members find themselves aligning much more than you might think about which candidates seem strongest. And leaving space if you have it for a long shot can be a smart move.


Alison M. Armstrong, Collection Management Librarian, McConnell Library, Radford University: Some, I learned through trial and error. Experience has taught me that I should usually trust myself. Other things were from blogs like this one. I learned a lot from talking to other managers.

In conversations with colleagues, friends, and family, I listen to their experiences and we talk through things and different perspectives. The confidential nature of hiring and management can make talking about current issues or questions a challenge. This can have a soloing effect and make you feel like you are working in isolation but, talking in general terms, and broadly speaking about past experiences can allow information sharing and learning from others to occur.

Hearing about the experiences of others in a variety of professions can be beneficial. You never know when a piece of information will stick with you for you to apply months or years later.


Jimmie Epling, Director, Darlington County Library System:

How did you learn to hire people? Learning to hire people is an ongoing task. The way you hire people changes with the introduction of new laws or the reinterpretation of existing laws, societal trends, the latest recommended management practices, and the staff involved in the process. This said, it seems the library science programs generally do a poor job of training students in employment practices. The best training for me came by way of continuing education lead by human resources managers, especially SHRM certified managers, and labor attorneys.

What did you learn through formal training versus through mistakes, mentoring, or some other method? The best hiring practices and advice came through formal training. The formal training was impactful because it spoke to the costly financial consequences on an organization just by an accusation can have and the simple ways such could be avoided. You don’t want to learn by your mistakes. Mentoring is helpful, but there are practices that a mentor may encourage that are really unproductive for all involved, such as courtesy interviews.

Are there trainings or tools you would recommend? The best training is lead by human resources managers, especially SHRM certified managers, and labor attorneys. A good resource is the Allied Professional Association of the American Library Association’s “Library Worklife: HE E-News for Today’s Leaders” (http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/). “Library Worklife” is a great resource for the latest labor legislative news that also includes information on trends and the latest practices.


Hilary Kraus, Research Services Librarian, University of Connecticut: I haven’t seen much formal training for members of search committees in the academic libraries in which I’ve worked. Typically it covered what it is and isn’t legal to ask or do, along with internal HR policies such as using a matrix to evaluate candidates. Most of what I’ve learned about good (and bad) hiring practices is based on personal experience either as a member of a search committee or as a candidate. In the last few years, I’ve become very interested in humane hiring practices, and I’ve seen an uptick in webinars and conference sessions on topics like inclusivity, reducing bias, and how to treat candidates kindly and fairly. If you’re in higher education, ACRL has been producing some quality content in this area. Unfortunately, you really have to seek out these kinds of trainings yourself. I would love to see more guidance in this area for search committees as they’re formed. At a very basic level, I would encourage folks who are tapped to be part of those committees to really consider what they would like their own experience to be as a candidate, and try to apply that to the work they do.


Laurie Phillips, Interim Dean of Libraries, J. Edgar & Louise S. Monroe Library, Loyola University New Orleans: I started learning about the search/hiring process in library school. My academic library management class (with Anne Woodsworth) was one of the most valuable courses I had. I was the only student in the class who was job hunting at the time, so we used my experiences as a case study. Then, after I got here, I was on faculty search committees from the beginning. We have a regular process, which has been honed over time. The biggest change is that we no longer talk about all of the candidates from the beginning. We have a grid and anyone we agree on, either yes or no, we don’t spend time discussing in depth before first round interviews. We also err on the side of more interviews in the first round because you gain a lot from just talking to someone. The biggest evolution of our process is interview questions. HR gave us some great questions several years ago and we have developed a pool of questions we start with, then write questions to get at particular aspects of the job. The question we ask ourselves is “What do we need to know from them to make a good decision?” I have developed very good instincts about candidates and fit over the years. Several years ago, I interviewed a man for one position and I said to the dean at the time, “I think he’s great, but is better suited working for me (in information resources) than for this position.” A year later, I had an opening and hired him. He’s been amazing.


Randall Schroeder, Director, Retired: The most valuable thing I did to get a grasp on hiring after 20 years of being a public service librarian and not in charge of hiring was to take a summer class on library administration at the University of Wisconsin. It was taught by a veteran library director from the La Crosse Public Library. She gave the class tools that would allow them to tease out what we needed to know about candidates. The most useful tool was to get the candidates to tell stories about their experiences. That goes a long way to establish their social and people skills. I’ve found that people skills can be the most difficult to get a handle on during the interview process. Learning about interview skills in a classroom setting and not learning those skills by guess and by golly during a hiring process made it much more relaxed and those techniques stuck. You had time to think about those skills and let them sink in. There was never a hiring process where I didn’t use those skills I learned in Madison.

The other teachable moments were simply learning from horrible interviews during my job searches. The question that always came into my mind while designing a process was a variation on the George Constanza conundrum from the old Seinfeld show (George, what is your first instinct? Do the opposite). Especially when it came to the treatment of candidates, I would find myself asking, “what would (fill in the blank) College do? Do the opposite. My goal was to make interviews and the process as humane as possible. I appreciated it with the libraries and colleges that also had a reasonably humane process. I never wanted to be the anecdote of a hellish interview afterwards.

Finally, I will pass this tidbit I learned from a business professor who was on a search committee with me at a university in Michigan. “Which candidate would you be willing to be stuck with during a flight delay at O’Hare Airport?” When in doubt, go with that candidate.


Interested in more discussion? Comment here or take a look at Twitter; I asked the same question there earlier in the week.

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A webpage or electronic portfolio with previous work is a must.

Fish MarketThis anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Public services/reference librarians

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an  suburban area rural area in the Southern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

Met minimum qualifications and had the skills we were looking for/needed.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

All applications were evaluated by the search committee.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Did not meet minimum qualifications.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Be able to demonstrate the needed/required skills. A webpage or electronic portfolio with previous work is a must.

I want to hire someone who is

adaptable

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 1

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Varies by position, but any kind of experience is a big plus.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ Yes

Why or why not?

I could go on for hours. Want to get coffee? The profession is not keeping up with the changes in information publication and dissemination and changes in higher education. Library school curriculum is mostly the same as it was 15-20 years ago, and far, far too many librarians simply want to do what they did in their jobs 15-20 years ago. So many experienced librarians think technology is only something “young” people know about and refuse to learn about emerging technology. More and more academic libraries need to demonstrate impact on student learning and retention, difficult enough, and without the ability to change and adapt and re-define what librarianship is that will just not happen. Not just demonstrating the impact, but actually making an impact. Because we really do not need someone with a master’s degree demonstrating how to use a discovery tool to undergrads. Librarians need to learn to do something more, better, and different to survive. Of course, a lot of people will answer this question with the usual “hip, hip, hooray” nonsense about being passionate about librarianship and how great it is, but that is doing nothing to keep the profession relevant. We need critical eyes to evaluate the profession and make changes. Who is going to do that? Certainly not ALA or ACRL.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Southern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Suburban area

I would rather hire somebody who has a ton of IT experience or has a PhD in education or who actually understands about research than a person who only has an MLIS

Paramaribo market scene. Women and men. 1922.This anonymous interview is with an academic librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

just librarians, plain and simple

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a suburban area in the Northeastern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ more than 100, but less than 200

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 25% or less

And how would you define “hirable”?

someone who met our characteristics of what we specified in the job description. We even had people apply who didn’t yet have their degrees. That job was specifically for someone with supervisory experience, and hardly anybody had that.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

HR doesn’t weed out any. They are evaluated by a committee using the position announcement.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

They don’t have any professional library experience at all.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: sometimes

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

In your resume, don’t give me the generic “sat at reference desk, delivered instruction” when describing your reference & instruction experience. I already know exactly what a reference & instruction librarian does. Tell me HOW YOU MADE A DIFFERENCE.

Oh yeah, and get a crapload of IT knowledge too.

I want to hire someone who is

ambitious

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ Other: 0

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 1

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are more positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

Even for entry-level professional positions, we look for experience, like an internship or a grad student job in a library. We have in the past specifically advertised for “new graduates” with 5 years or less since their MLIS. But even those, we were looking for someone with a little experience.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ Yes

Why or why not?

In the sense that you need a “library degree.” That was just a hoop to jump through 25 years ago, and it’s a hoop to jump through now. I would rather hire somebody who has a ton of IT experience or has a PhD in education or who actually understands about research than a person who only has an MLIS. The MLIS is just for enculturation. There is NOTHING, and I mean nothing, unique about library knowledge. Give me a good, knowledgeable person, and I can indoctrinate them into librarianship on the job.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Northeastern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Suburban area

We need more professionals with the bigger picture and a vision for the future

melanie lightbody
Mel Lightbody has been working in libraries for over 30 years and been a director for over 15. She has worked as a professional librarian in Washington, Oregon and now California. She loves encouraging and mentoring others in the profession.
Melanie Lightbody is a public librarian who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. She hires the following types of LIS professionals:

children’s and branch managers so far.

She works at a library in a rural area in the Western US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25 or fewer

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ Other: 6 to 10 were hirable

And how would you define “hirable”?

Someone who has the mix of experience and skills to fit the position we’re hiring for.

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

We only see applicants who score over 70 on the initial screening.This initial screening is done by the County’s HR department. Then the hiring team reviews the applications to decide who to interview.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

At the HR level, not meeting the minimum qualifications as identified in the official position description. These need to be explicit on the job application.

At our level, not showing any specific interest in the position we’re offering will make us less likely to interview them. Also, our experience with candidates from out of the geographic area has not been great so we may forgo interviewing them unless they show specific interest and experience.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ Other: No, but I’d love to if they asked me

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Know the job description, tailor your application to it as explicitly as possible. Getting through HR pre-screening may a job hunter’s biggest hurdle.

I want to hire someone who is

Open

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 3-4

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ Other: there were less but we’ve added two more the last two years.

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ Yes

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

workplace requires two years of experience

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ I don’t know

Why or why not?

We need more professionals with the bigger picture and a vision for the future. It is not about the realities of busy libraries, it is about the perception that libraries are no longer needed because middle-class and up often don’t think they do need them and perhaps they don’t.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

Show specific interest in the job you are applying for. Stay away from generic cover letters, resumes and applications.

Do you hire librarians? Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey

Or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

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Filed under Public, Rural area, State of the Job Market 2015, Western US

We are always looking for new, excited librarians to hire when we have an opening.

Queipo Market in Little Havana - MiamiThis anonymous interview is with an employee at an academic library who has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring or search committee. When asked, “Are you a librarian?”  this person responded, “It’s complicated.” This person hires the following types of LIS professionals:

Technical service staff, faculty librarians, archivists, instructors

This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in an urban area in the Midwestern US.

Approximately how many people applied for the last librarian (or other professional level) job at your workplace?

√ 25-75

Approximately what percentage of those would you say were hirable?

√ 26-50 %

And how would you define “hirable”?

Has an MLS from an ALA-accredited school, has some (even minimal) library experience, shows a basic understanding of library terminology and technology (MARC records, ILS systems, etc.)

How are applications evaluated, and by whom?

A committee is always formed. HR does not weed out applicants, the committee does. Usually, the applications are looked at by all the committee members, who then meet and discuss who gets cut immediately (ie who doesn’t meet the basic requirements for the job), and then the remaining applicants are discussed at length for who gets a telephone and/or in-person interview.

What is the most common reason for disqualifying an applicant without an interview?

Not having the required degree for the job.

Do you (or does your library) give candidates feedback about applications or interview performance?

√ No

What is the most important thing for a job hunter to do in order to improve his/her/their hirability?

Tailor your resume and cover letter to show that you specifically meet all of the minimum/preferred qualifications. If you don’t show that you meet those qualifications right away in the application process, you won’t make it to the interview round.

I want to hire someone who is

capable

How many staff members are at your library/organization?

√ 10-50

How many permanent, full time librarian (or other professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

How many permanent, full time para-professional (or other non-professional level) jobs has your workplace posted in the last year?

√ 2

Can you tell us how the number of permanent, full-time librarian positions at your workplace has changed over the past decade?

√ There are the same number of positions

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with part-time or hourly workers over the past decade?

√ No

Have any full-time librarian positions been replaced with para-professional workers over the past decade?

√ No

Does your workplace require experience for entry-level professional positions? If so, is it an official requirement or just what happens in practice?

It happens in practice. We usually have a great applicant pool with lots of experience applying, so we usually gravitate towards those applicants. That being said, we consider all sorts of library work (part time, as a student worker, even volunteering) as library experience.

Is librarianship a dying profession?

√ No

Why or why not?

I think it’s a shifting profession (more technological skills required than before), but it’s not dying. We have the same number of positions here that we’ve had in the past. We are always working on exciting new projects and collaborations.

Do you have any other comments, for job hunters or about the survey?

Keep your head up! We are always looking for new, excited librarians to hire when we have an opening.

Do you hire librarians?  Take this survey: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey or take other Hiring Librarians surveys.

For some context, look at the most recent summary of responses.

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Midwestern US, State of the Job Market 2015, Urban area

Oh Look, a New Survey of People Who Hire Librarians

Hello,

Do you hire librarians or other LIS workers?

We are looking for hiring managers, members of hiring/search committees, HR professionals, etc. who are willing to take 5-10 minutes to fill out a survey about the LIS job market.

This is a new survey for Hiring Librarians (www.hiringlibrarians.com). The purpose is to gather and disseminate information about hiring, rather than to perform formal research. Responses will be presented on the blog, anonymously or with a short bio, depending on the preference of the responder. We are very committed to maintaining confidentiality if desired.

The direct link to the survey is:
http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey
(You can take a look at the questions and browse through the entire survey without having to answer anything).

Please feel free to share with any colleagues who might be interested. I’m also happy to answer any questions or concerns you might have, please contact me.

YOUR PAL,
Emily

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Filed under News and Administration

Stats and Graphs: Hiring Librarians’ 2014 in Review

This is the kind of thing I’m always curious about with other blogs, so here are my auto-generated WordPress stats for you, dear readers.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 250,000 times in 2014. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 11 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Views didn’t quite double, but it’s certainly up over last year.

It’s been an interesting run.  I started this blog in February 2012, so we are coming up on THREE YEARS.

I must admit, I’ve been a bit on Hiring Librarians auto-pilot this year.  Part of it is being less of a one woman show. I’ve had excellent help.  Currently, Sarah Keil is asking and posting the Further Questions series, Jennifer Devine is taking care of transcribing the responses to open surveys, and Sherle Abramson-Bluhm is handling the Resume/CV Review service.   And over the summer a number of folks helped with a big push to get the backlog of survey responses transcribed.   Thank you all!

But another part of my auto-pilotness is that I’m not job hunting, so my personal interest has waned.

Nonetheless, I’m thinking of a new survey, maybe a state of the job market interview with hiring managers.

Or maybe something else?  Any ideas or requests?

 

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Job Hunter’s Web Guide: LisList

Ever wished for a REALLY BIG LIST of LIS jobs?  Look no further than LisList.  Keep reading to learn more.


lislist

What is it?  Please give us your elevator speech!

LisList is a list of U.S. library jobs, updated daily.  It includes public, academic, school, and special library jobs.  We are especially interested in  those that require an MLS or equivalent.

 When was it started?  Why was it started?

It started in February 2014, so it’s brand new.  It was started to fill what we saw as a gap in the job search resources available for librarians.  There are a number of good sites that offer articles and advice, and some of them include job listings by state or specialty, or job listings submitted by employers .  But other than LisList, there is no clearinghouse with one big list of jobs (like the one Lisjobs featured in its heyday).

Who runs it?

Amadee Ricketts, a youth services librarian from Colorado, and James Orndorf, a photographer who happens to be married to a librarian.

 Are you a “career expert”? What are your qualifications?

We are definitely not career experts, but we’re good at making lists.

 Who is your target audience?

Librarians, aspiring librarians, and library workers.

 What’s the best way to use your site?  Should users consult it daily?  Or as needed? Should they already know what they need help with, or can they just noodle around?

The list grows every day, but users can check it out as needed.

Does your site provide:

Job listings

Should readers also look for you on social media? Or is your content available in other formats? 

√ Twitter: @theLisList (highlights a Job of the Day)

√  Tumblr: http://lislist.tumblr.com (highlights a Job of the Day)

Do you charge for anything on your site?

No.

Can you share any stories about job hunters that found positions after using your site?

Not yet, but hopefully in the future.

Anything else you’d like to share with my readers about your site in particular, or about library hiring/job hunting in general?

Nope.

Do you run a web resource focused on LIS jobs or careers?  Or is there one you’d like to know more about?  Email me a hiringlibrariansATgmail to suggest a site for the Job Hunter’s Web Guide.

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Filed under Job Hunters Web Guide