Tag Archives: Midwestern United States

Business Casual Wear- Nice Blouse and Khakis/slacks

Necktie 13 by Flickr user shindoverse

This anonymous interview is with an Academic librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This librarian works in a city/town in the Midwestern United States, at a library with 10-50 staff members.

What Candidates Should Wear

Should the candidate wear a suit to the interview?

√ Probably, yes (but it’s ok if the candidate wears something a little less formal)

An outfit with a coordinated blazer and trousers:

√ Counts as a suit

Bare arms are inappropriate in an interview, even in the summer.

√ False

If a woman wears a skirt to an interview, should she also wear pantyhose?

√ No, but it’s not a dealbreaker

Women should wear make-up to an interview:

√ I don’t care what’s on the face, it’s what’s in the brain that counts

Is there anything a candidate might wear that would cause them to be instantly out of the running? If you have any funny stories about horrifying interview outfits, we’d love to hear them.

Extremely skimpy clothing showing lots of breasts, butt crack or underwear. No pants falling down.

Do you expect different levels of formality of dress, depending on the position you’re hiring for?

√ Yes, the higher the position, the more formal I expect the candidate to dress

Which jewelry may candidates wear: (Please select all that are acceptable)

√ A few simple necklaces, bracelets, and/or rings

Which hair colors are acceptable for candidates:

√ Natural colors (black, brown, red, blonde, gray)

The way a candidate dresses should:

√ Be fairly neutral

How does what a candidate wears affect your hiring decision?

Only if at either extreme of too sloppy / too casual or way too formal.

What This Library Wears

How do you dress when you are going to conduct an interview?

In business casual wear- nice blouse and khakis/slacks.

On a scale of one (too dressed up for my workplace) to five (too casual), khakis and a polo shirt are:

3

What’s the dress code at your library/organization?

√ Other: no code

Are there any specific items of clothing, etc. that are forbidden by your dress code?

√ N/A: We wear what we want!

Librarians at your organization wear:

√ Name tags

This survey was co-authored by Jill of Librarian Hire Fashion – submit your interview outfit to her blog!

Photo: Necktie 13 by Flickr user shindoverse via Creative Commons License

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Academic, Midwestern US, What Should Candidates Wear?

Be Specific … and Be Honest

JJ Pionke

JJ Pionke is currently a graduate student in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. She is looking forward to being an academic librarian, and has spent less than six months looking for a position in an Academic library, for positions requiring at least two years of experience. Here is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

I have 10 years of teaching experience, changing careers, 2 overseas internships in information literacy and cataloging, 4 semesters as a TA, 1 internship building an online and physical exhibit.

Ms. Pionke is in a city/town in the Midwestern US, and is willing to move anywhere. In her spare time, she rides a motorcycle, plays video games, and of course, reads a wide range of material including science fiction and Victorian poetry. You can find her at jjpionke.com.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

job fit, salary, flexibility

Where do you look for open positions?

INALJ, ALA Joblist

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other: I prefer to see a salary listed but it’s not necessarily a red flag if it is not.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

My first packet took about a day because I didn’t have anything put together. Now that I have everything organized, I probably spend a few hours on each packet with proofreading and updating any information.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be specific in what they are looking for and be honest. Example: if there has been a round of retirements as a cost saving measure, knowing that would be useful.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Be more communicative and be explicit in what they are and are not looking for.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

How well you fit with what they are looking for.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

Ultimately, I think getting hired is a confluence of things, including fit. The job market can be an intimidating place but staying positive, keeping skills sharp, and continuing education while you look, are the keys to finding a job that will make everyone happy.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under City/town, Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US

MIGHT Be OK for a Page or Shelver if the Applicant is Teenaged (i.e. Too Young to Know Better)

Dress For Success 3 by Flickr user pennstatenewsThis anonymous interview is with an Public librarian who has been a member of a hiring or search committee. This librarian works at a library with 10-50 staff members in a

semi-rural college town

in the Northeastern US.

*This person also said that they would like a bio/info about his/her library included, but then didn’t leave contact info. If this is you, and that is still the case, please let me know at hiringlibrariansATgmail.

What Candidates Should Wear

Should the candidate wear a suit to the interview?

√ Probably, yes (but it’s ok if the candidate wears something a little less formal)

An outfit with a coordinated blazer and trousers:

√ I do not know and/or care

Bare arms are inappropriate in an interview, even in the summer.

√ True

If a woman wears a skirt to an interview, should she also wear pantyhose?

√ Other: I don’t care

Women should wear make-up to an interview:

√ I don’t care, as long as it’s not over-the-top
√ I don’t care what’s on the face, it’s what’s in the brain that counts
√ Never
√ Other:

Is there anything a candidate might wear that would cause them to be instantly out of the running? If you have any funny stories about horrifying interview outfits, we’d love to hear them.

Inappropriately casual and/or sloppy attire – sweatpants, etc. This MIGHT be okay for a page or shelver if the applicant is teenaged (i.e. too young to know better), but anyone applying for a professional or paraprofessional position should take the opportunity seriously enough to wear something that looks reasonably nice.

Do you expect different levels of formality of dress, depending on the position you’re hiring for?

√ Other: Yes, to some extent; a director candidate should dress better than a circ sub, for instance. But this isn’t a hard and fast rule for me.

Which jewelry may candidates wear: (Please select all that are acceptable)

√ Single, simple necklace, bracelet, and/or ring
√ A few simple necklaces, bracelets, and/or rings
√ All of the simple necklaces, bracelets, and rings he or she can load on
√ Arty or more elaborate necklaces, bracelets, or rings
√ Nose Ring (nostril)
√ Eyebrow Ring, Monroe piercing, septum piercing, or other face piercing
√ Earrings
√ Multiple Ear Piercings
√ Large gauge ear jewelry (stretched ears)
√ Other: (dependent on position to some extent; directors, for instance, should show sensitivity to the general aesthetic preferences of the community they’ll have to interact with)

Which hair colors are acceptable for candidates:

√ All of them, even pink

The way a candidate dresses should:

√ I don’t really care how a candidate dresses

How does what a candidate wears affect your hiring decision?

Very little unless it’s pretty inappropriate. Sometimes the clothes give an impression of the kind of personality the applicant has (e.g. wearing a sweater-vest and tie rather than a suit) but that only applies as far as possible “fit” with the organization goes.

What This Library Wears

How do you dress when you are going to conduct an interview?

I wear my normal library-wear, which is business casual. (I try to make sure to select one of my “nicer” outfits.)

On a scale of one (too dressed up for my workplace) to five (too casual), khakis and a polo shirt are:

3

What’s the dress code at your library/organization?

√ Business casual

Are there any specific items of clothing, etc. that are forbidden by your dress code? (Please check all that apply)

√ Other: I’m not actually sure – would have to check my handbook

Librarians at your organization wear: (Please check all that apply)

√ Name tags
√ Other: occasionally, pins as part of our word-of-mouth marketing

Do you have any other comments?

You are an Ask A Manager reader, aren’t you? (This survey bears striking resemblance to some topics discussed in a recent blog post!) 😉

This survey was co-authored by Jill of Librarian Hire Fashion – submit your interview outfit to her blog!

Photo: 

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Filed under 10-50 staff members, Northeastern US, Public, Rural area, What Should Candidates Wear?

Fewer “Must Have” Requirements and More “Desired” Qualifications

Man and Hunting Dog: Tallahasee FloridaThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for A year to 18 months. This person is looking in Library vendors/service providers and Special libraries, at the following levels:Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory, Senior Librarian.

This job hunter is in an urban area in the Midwestern US and is not willing to move.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. Salary at least on par with the area.
2. Benefits at a decent cost and decently generous (e.g. more than 2 weeks PTO, health premiums less than 10% of salary)
3. Flexible time and/or work location.

Where do you look for open positions?

LinkedIn, Indeed, INALJ, SLA Job Board,

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Depends on the size of the packet and the type of firm. For a special library I spend an hour or two on the cover letter crafting to fit the ad specifications. For government jobs more time spent on KPIs and showing where my qualifications fit each position point.
Generally would say I spend 3-4 hours on an application.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

Yes

When would you like employers to contact you?

To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

Meeting department members/potential co-workers
Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Fewer “must have” requirements and more “desired” qualifications. This way people who have say 2 years instead of 5 years but every other desired qualification may apply.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Contact us when we’re not getting a shot. Most firms now have emails into their contact databases, it would be easy to send out thanks but not at this time letters en masse.
Acknowledge when things don’t go forward. Sometimes I have had a great interview, the recruiter is very positive, but something happens and I’m not the candidate. I simple, we’ve gone another direction is very useful at that point.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I don’t think there is one, I think it is more of a match. I got my recent job because they needed someone they didn’t have to train much to stabilize a situation. I had worked at the firm in the past, left on good terms, and was trusted by the project head.
If your personality doesn’t match the firm’s culture it simply won’t work and that is really one of the most important pieces in today’s workplace.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US, Other Organization or Library Type, Special, Urban area

Security, Wage, Satisfaction

Sylvia BlySylvia Bly graduated from Wayne State University in 2012 with a MLIS and a Certificate in Records Information Management. She is currently employed by Deloitte LP as an intern in their Records Information Management area.  She says:

The internship has been a wonderful experience. I have learned a great deal of information relating to the records environment, and am eager to continue in my career.

She has been job hunting for more than 18 months, at Library vendors/service providers, Public and Special libraries, and in Records, for positions at the level of requiring at least two years of experience. Ms. Bly is in a city/town in the Midwestern US, and is willing to move anywhere. She belongs to ALA and SLA as well as ARMA.  You can contact her via LinkedIn.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Security
Wage
Satisfaction

Where do you look for open positions?

Careerbuilder
Monster
ALA Joblist
various listservs
LinkedIn
Indeed.com

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Depends on what the job position is asking for.  Anywhere from 15 to 30 minutes.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under City/town, Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US

Being Yourself at Every Stage of the Process, But the Best Version of Yourself

Jessica Olin earned her BA in History from Hood College, her MLIS from Simmons College, and her MAEd from Touro University International.  She has recently started a new job as the Director of the Robert H. Parker Library at Wesley College in Dover, Delaware. Prior to that, she had been looking for a new position, off and on, for about nine months, in Academic libraries, at the following levels: Department Head, Assistant Director, or Director. She was in a rural area in the Midwestern US, and was willing to move almost anywhere. Ms. Olin has presented at the Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association annual conference and at LOEX. Her professional interests include, among other things, incorporating popular reading materials into traditional academic library collections, building communities at liberal arts college libraries, and bridging the gap between library science graduate programs and professional practice. In her limited spare time, she likes to cross-stitch, watch Doctor Who, and read lots of comic books. You can read her thoughts about librarianship and higher education at Letters to a Young Librarian and her thoughts about everything (including librarianship) by following her Twitter stream @olinj.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. Location

2. How well it fits what I want in a position (responsibilities)

3. Type of institution

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist

HigherEdJobs.com

INALJ

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other: Yes, but it’s not necessarily a red flag when it’s not.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I have a cover letter that I modify for each application packet, and I do the same with other materials to a lesser extent. Modifying the letter takes the longest, since it reflects research I do into the parent institution and the library itself, and usually takes an hour or two.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

To acknowledge my application

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

√ To follow-up after an interview

√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Other: Different at each stage. Email for early stages, phone for later.

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Advertise broadly, including listservs and such.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

More communication, even if it’s a form email.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Being yourself at every stage of the process, but the best version of yourself.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US, Rural area

Check Out the Library/Institution (and the City) on Wikipedia

RC MiesslerR.C. Miessler is a recent graduate of Indiana University, Indianapolis (MLS, 2012); previously he graduated from Christian Theological Seminary with an Master of Theological Studies degree (2010) and received his BA from Franklin College (2002). When not filling out job applications, he works as technical support specialist for a small helpdesk and volunteers at a seminary library. Mr. Miessler has been job hunting for six months to a year, looking in academic libraries at the entry level. Here is how he describes his experience with internships/volunteering:

My internship was at a small theological seminary, where I spent a lot of time in public services and cataloging. I am still volunteering on a part-time basis in order to continue to grow professionally and strengthen my CV.

Mr. Miessler is in an urban area of the Midwestern US, and is willing to move anywhere. His professional interests are in reference and instruction in theology and religion, open access publishing, information-seeking behavior, and video games in the library; in his free time he enjoys writing fiction and cooking. You can follow him on Twitter (@iconodule), or find him on LinkedIn.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. Proper fit – do my career goals and previous education/experience match the requirements and duties?

2. Development – will this library/institution further my professional and personal development?

3. Geographic proximity – is the job located close to friends and family?

Where do you look for open positions?

National library job sites (ALA JobList, ARL Job Announcements, etc.)

Regional job sites (OhioNET, RAILS, etc.)

Individual library/institution sites

General career sites (careerbuilder.com, indeed.com)

Job blogs (INALJ, SLIS Jobs)


Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Review the job posting, visit the library/institution webpage and review mission/vision statements, check out the library/institution (and the city) on Wikipedia, customize resume/CV, customize references, customize cover letter, complete online application … this generally takes about 1-2 hours per application

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

√ To follow-up after an interview

√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Provide clear job descriptions with open and close dates and make sure that the qualifications (required and desired) are specific. Provide salary ranges and benefits in job descriptions.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Communication … let applicants know where they are in the process, even if it is just a form email/letter. If a “desired” qualification is really going to be a “required” qualification except for a very few exceptions, just make it a required so we can know if we should spend time on the application. Note entry level jobs as such. When jobs are closed, remove them from the websites … it’s a horrible feeling to spent time working on an application just to find that they’ve already filled the position.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Networking and knowing the right people. It’s hard to get recognized on merit/education/experience alone …

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US, Urban area

Appeal to Library Schools

Ryan DreierRyan Dreier is currently the Volunteer Director at The Salvation Army of Brown County, where over 3,000 volunteers have logged at least one hour of service in 2012! He also works at FedEx Office as a “Generalist.” A librarian in the making, Mr. Dreier will finish his MLIS at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee this year. He has been job hunting for a year to 18 months in academic and public libraries, at the entry level. Of his internship/volunteering experience, he says:

Graduating by the end of summer, have done some volunteer work, no formal internship as I work two jobs to put myself through school without debt

He is in a city/town, in the Midwestern US, and is willing to move within an eight hour drive from home. You can follow him on Twitter @ryonlibraryon. Ryan also says:

Green Bay, WI–GO PACKERS!!!!

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

An opportunity to learn and grow
A position to use my experiences to grow programs
The opportunity to serve the community and share and disseminate information

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist

Libgig

Wisconsin Valley Job Posting Boards

inalj.com

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I usually include my resume, transcript, references, cover letter, and that’s on top of the job application requested by the potential employer

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: Sometimes I feel like its a matter of interpretation on skill assessment surveys

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Other: Commutation of expectations and vision of that specific library

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Appeal to library schools, and post openings

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Provide feedback on what you could do to improve when requested

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I think the secret is that you have to know someone or that full time positions are being filled by paraprofessionals or professionals that are on staff but only working part time, leaving little room to get in.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under City/town, Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US

Now Hiring: Omaha Public Library

Want to work with one of Hiring Librarian’s People Who Hire Librarians?
Deadline to apply:Today! 2/7/2013
https://prod.fadvhms.com/omaha/JobBoard/JobDetails.aspx?__ID=*49CF8C7F9DD5CBD7


Manya ShorrManya Shorr is the senior manager for Branch Services at the Omaha Public library.  She has been a hiring manager and a member of a hiring committee. Manya’s work to bring new adults, single people, and the business community into Omaha’s Swanson branch earned her a spot as a 2010 Mover and Shaker.  OPL has between 100-200 staff members. It is an

essential catalyst, collaborator and connector

for the vibrant city of Omaha (yes, really!). Not sold on working there? Here is what they say about their employees:

We recognize our staff as our greatest resource. We are passionate about our work, we have fun, and we work together as a team. We trust each other and respect diverse ideas.

What are the top three things you look for in a candidate?

A desire to serve the public and enthusiasm about public libraries
Knowledge of what’s happening in libraries around the world (professional candidates only)
Inquisitive and excited about the job

Do you have any instant dealbreakers, either in the application packet or the interview process?

The only thing I see repeatedly are applicants that want to work M-F, 8-5. This is not a realistic schedule for a public library. If someone wants to work in a public library, they should expect to work at least one weekend day and one night every week.

What are you tired of seeing on resumes/in cover letters?

Personalize your cover letter! I know it’s extremely frustrating to apply for many jobs because it takes so much time but you need to understand that I can tell when you have sent the same letter to multiple organizations. I want you to want to work here. Here, in Omaha. Think of your cover letter as our first date. You need to charm me and make me love you.

Is there anything that people don’t put on their resumes that you wish they did?

Sometimes it’s hard to understand what someone does on a day-to-day basis. I don’t exactly know the answer (I struggle with this on my own resume) but I find myself filling in the gaps when I read people’s resumes and I never know if I’m accurate.

How many pages should a cover letter be?

√ Only one!

How many pages should a resume/CV be?

√ As many as it takes, but keep it short and sweet

Do you have a preferred format for application documents?

√ .pdf

Should a resume/CV have an Objective statement?

√ Other: I don’t think I’ve ever read one that didn’t seem silly and superfluous

.
If applications are emailed, how should the cover letter be submitted?

√ Other: At my current library, this is irrelevant, since all applications go through the City Human Resources department first. By the time I see anything, it’s been printed out.

What’s the best way to win you over in an interview?

I wish I could impress upon all applicants how important it is to come in to the interview with enthusiasm and energy. Don’t be shy about talking about yourself and most importantly, don’t discount your accomplishments. Repeatedly, applicants tell me the things they don’t know how to do, rather than all the things they can do. If you haven’t done anything yet, talk about your enthusiasm for it, or what you’ve done to prepare to do this thing in the future.

Also, if you are a recent graduate, don’t assume that your lack of experience is a hinderance. Remember that you can’t read my mind. There’s a strong chance that I’m looking for a new professional to hire. Don’t. Make. Assumptions. Tell me why I should hire you, not why I shouldn’t.

What are some of the most common mistakes people make in an interview?

My biggest pet peeve is when applicants tell me what the organization can do for them, rather than what they will bring to the organization. It’s nice that your aunt/grandmother/cousin lives in Omaha, or that you’ve always wanted to live in the Midwest, or this job would be great for your career, but I urge you think about how that sounds to the organization. I’m interested in your success, but primarily I want to know what you can do for my library.

The other thing that bothers me is when an applicant has not done any research into my library and/or service area. Look at the website, check out demographic information about the city, walk through a couple of branches. Any little effort is appreciated. Not all public libraries are the same and painting all of us with the same broad brush is annoying.

Lastly, remember that you are making a first (and often, last) impression. Smile, have a firm handshake, make eye contact, and act like you want to be there. These little things are so often forgotten and are so important. If you don’t make eye contact with me, I have to assume you will not make eye contact with the public either.

Has hiring changed at your organization since you’ve been in on the process?

Not that I know.

Anything else you’d like to let job-seekers know?

Many public libraries are part of a City/County structure and have very little to do with hiring process. Here in Omaha, the City HR department culls the list of applicants and gives us 3-5 names that we can interview. That’s it. If you are #6, I will never see your name or your application. Sometimes there is a scoring tie and we see more names, but not normally. I also have no control over the timeline. We submit a request to fill the position to HR and then we wait. I know it’s frustrating to be on the other side of things (believe me, I have to apply for jobs too) but try to understand that the library often has little to no control over the process.

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Filed under 100-200 staff members, Midwestern US, now hiring, Public

Resume and Cover Letter Are Not Going to Take as Long as a Resume/Cover letter/References/Application/Online Job Application

Czar Ferdinand hunting (LOC)This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field) and was hired within the last two months. This person is/has been looking for a new position for more than 18 months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Library vendor/service providers, Public libraries, School libraries, Special libraries, bookstores, and anything, at the entry level and for positions requiring at least two years of experience. Here is how this person describes experience with internships/volunteering:

I had a 3 month service learning project volunteering (menial tasks) at a small library, and a 6 month project at a public library in adult services.

This job hunter is in a suburban area in the Midwestern US, and is/was willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1) Full time hours and benefits
2) A good supervisor
3) I prefer the Chicagoland area

Where do you look for open positions?

INALJ
indeed.com
Reaching Across Illinois Library Systems (RAILS) job board
college/university websites

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

It depends on what the institution requires. A resume and cover letter are not going to take as long as a resume/cover letter/references/application/online job application.

I spend a good 5-10 minutes comparing my resume to the position description, noting keywords that I can use on my resume to highlight my applicable skills.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me
√ Other:

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Being able to present

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Is this a problem? I was under the impression that employers are bombarded with resumes for every position. Surely, they can find a qualified applicant.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

ROB: I just tested for [a job]…
MIKE: …yeah, a month ago.
CHARLES: Oh, I’m sorry. How’d your folks take it?
ROB: I haven’t heard an official “no” yet.
–Swingers, 1996

Seriously, you can’t contact me enough. Tell me you’re sorry and you are going to interview other candidates. Tell me that the position has been filled. Don’t leave me feeling like I just sent my resume into a black hole. And don’t send me a snail mail letter 3 months after I’ve already forgotten I applied for that job. Is it too much to ask for a timely response?

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

It is, without a doubt, knowing someone and networking. Which is why it is miserable for the long term unemployed.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US, Other Organization or Library Type, Public, School, Special, Suburban area