Tag Archives: Naomi House

I am a Terrible Liar, So I Avoid it Like the Plague

Man on Snowshoes Carrying RifleThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), and has been looking for a new position for more than 18 months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, and Museum / special collections, at the following levels: Supervisory, Department Head, Senior Librarian, and Director/Dean. This job hunter is in an urban area, in the Northeastern US.

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA joblist, CT library jobs, Educause, Highered jobs, Indeed, Libgig, LISjobs, MBCL job listings, Metro.org, NYline, Simply hired, SLA-ny, USAjobs.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Only for certain kinds of employers

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Between one and five hours, over a span of days.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: I am a terrible liar, so I avoid it like the plague. But I have sometimes wondered after the fact whether my answers were full enough.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ Other: To let me know that my references will be contacted.

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary
√ Being able to present
√ Other: One-on-one meeting with potential supervisor.

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Advertise widely and keep positions open until filled.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Provide written interview agendas ahead of time, along with the names of those on the committee, and/or those with whom the candidate will be meeting.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Competence, confidence, and a clear recognition of what your weaknesses as a candidate are.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

It would be good to know how many applications (on average) candidates are submitting prior to getting an interview and/or being hired.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

2 Comments

Filed under Academic, Archives, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Urban area

Livable Location, Entry Level

Shooting PartyThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field).  This person is looking in Academic libraries, at the entry level. This person describes his or her experience with internships/volunteering as:

Community college

This job hunter is in an urban area of the Western US, and is willing to move:

to places my spouse will live.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Reference and instruction position
Livable location
Entry level

Where do you look for open positions?

RSS feeds
Listserv
INALJ

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Two hours minimum

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Being able to present

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Thorough job descriptions

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Be more communicative.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Knowing the right people

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Job hunter's survey, Urban area, Western US

I just want the job or to be let out the door so I can find my job

Mr. Leatherman, homesteader, shooting hawks which have been carrying away his chickens, Pie Town, New MexicoThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), and has been hired within the last two months. This person had/has been looking for a new position for more than 18 months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, Library vendor/service providers, Public libraries, Special libraries, and Corporations, at the following levels: Entry level , Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory, Department Head, Senior Librarian, Branch Manager, Director/Dean,

(I have a lot of management experience so I really branch out a lot.)

Here is this person’s experience with internships/volunteering:

Recent grad. Volunteer at academic library’s digital initiatives. Internship at a public library’s reference department.

This job hunter is in a rural area of the Midwestern US, and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Enough pay to survive on… not get rich, just live comfortably.
Variety. I want a position that touches on multiple areas of the library, not just one little corner.
A position with promotion potential. Not that I wouldn’t be happy as a reference librarian my entire life, but I want to be able to move up and be a director too!

Where do you look for open positions?

INALJ. RAILS. ALA Joblist.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Depends on the job. If they are specific and detailed in the items that they list I will spend days on it. If they are generic, so am I.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

Yes

When would you like employers to contact you?

To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Other: Don’t waste my time or yours. If I’m not your guy, I don’t need or want to go through a process like this. I just want the job or to be let out the door so I can find my job. I have more important things to do than take a tour or meet people I’m not going to be co-workers of.

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be specific. How is your library different? I see hundreds of jobs every day… why is yours so special? What kind of personality are you looking for? What kind of experience will you accept? Don’t shoot for the stars if your pay is in the dirt.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Remove the fluff. Take out the tours, take out the meet/greet. Just focus on the skills and what you’re looking for. And try asking some legitimate questions. Don’t focus on the traditional cookie cutter questions, or your off the wall what would you read type of questions. Focus on the job and how best to get it done. Look for philosophical differences, etc. And give a candidate a chance to rebuttal the other candidates. You might not hire me over another person because of some stupid error… give me a chance to argue my point against theirs. In other words, maybe bring us back and clarify. Give me a chance to prove my point.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

You need to be a salesman. I’ll be blunt here. I’m a better worker than 3/4 of the people out there. I have great ideas, I’m dedicated, I’m will work faster and harder with more attention to detail than most out there… But I wont get hired because I’m not a salesman. I’ve lost out on three jobs because I couldn’t sell myself as well as the others, yet I could have done it better and for cheaper. As a hiring manager you need to look past the used car salesman and look at the credentials, the references, the history. Because I would be the best employee you’ve ever had but you wont ever give me a chance. I may not look or sound like a traditional library student but let me tell you… I am the future of this field and if you can’t adjust you’re going to end up being part of the problem instead of the solution.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

The problem with the library process is really two things. First, they want way to much experience for positions that a new grad could realistically do…. and probably just as well if not better than its being done now and for less money. And Second, the amount of money that is being offered isn’t enough to pay for the schooling I just put a couple years into getting. And, when it is enough, its only part time. I understand the budget process but there comes a point when you need to stand up and say to the board, you can either have quality or quantity… you choose.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

4 Comments

Filed under Academic, Archives, Job hunter's survey, Midwestern US, Other Organization or Library Type, Public, Rural area, Special

Stop Creating ‘Frankenstein’ Jobs

hunting in the cascadesThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field) and has been hired within the last two months.  This person looked/has been looking for a new position for more than 18 months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, Library vendors/service providers, Public libraries, School libraries, and Special libraries, at the following levels: Entry level and Requiring at least two years of experience. This new grad/entry level applicant has internship/volunteering experience:

I don’t have any internship experience; I couldn’t afford to pay tuition for the privilege of working for someone for free. Also in my area, the competition for internships and even volunteer positions is terrible. If you didn’t go to an Ivy League school, U of MD, or have an important family member you don’t get internships in the DC area.

This job hunter is in a suburban area of the Mid-Atlantic US, and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

A chance to make a professional contribution, the opportunity to grow professionally, and to perform work that provides me with real job satisfaction.

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA, SLA, Archive related job sites, Indeed, INALJ, USAJOBS, and anything else I can find.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other: At this point, salary isn’t that much of a consideration.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I prepare a cover letter, adjust my resume and hope. I don’t spend much more than 30 mins per submission.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone
√ Email
√ Mail
√ Phone for good news, email for bad news
√ Other:

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Other: I’d take anything I was offered.

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Stop creating ‘Frankenstein’ jobs, where you try to merge what had been several jobs into one person to save money.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Respond to all applications in a timely manner.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Frankly, I think its where you went to school, who you know, how old you are, and if you can help the school meet any of its non-work related demographic needs that really determine who gets hired.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

Only that it is so frustrating to try and get a job when eveyr one wants someone with experience. I recently competed for a job that paid below scale and for which I had both experience and education but didn’t get it. I’ll never know why but I feel that my age and the fact that I worked for the DC public schools play a part. I also think that having gotten my degree from SJSU, getting decent letters of recommendation has proven to be a real problem.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

4 Comments

Filed under Academic, Archives, Job hunter's survey, Other Organization or Library Type, Public, School, Special, Suburban area

Health Insurance

Lake 'Hunt', c1910sThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, Library vendors/service providers, Public libraries, and Special libraries, at the following levels: Entry level and Requiring at least two years of experience.  Here is how s/he describes her experience with internships/volunteering:

Independent study organizing archives for local non-profit
Paid internship with a Smithsonian Institution archive
Slightly more than 1 year of volunteer work (1-2 hrs/wk) in tech. services department of local public library while in library school
About 4 months of volunteer work (2-6 hrs/wk) at a NARA installation prior to beginning graduate school

This job hunter is in a city/town in the Southern US and is not willing to move.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

The chance to use and expand my professional skills
Money
Health insurance

Where do you look for open positions?

Professional listservs
INALJ
Archives Gig
other library job listing websites
SAA job board
employer websites

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

1. Read the application instructions.
2. Tweak my resume.
3. Draft the cover letter.
4. Revise the cover letter.
5. Revise the cover letter again.
6. And again.
7. Finalize cover letter and resume.
8. Complete online application, which often entails typing out what’s already in the attached cover letter and resume.
9. Submit the application.

The application process usually takes me 2-4 weeks, most of which is consumed by cover letter revision.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
 Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Other: Any method of contact is okay with me.

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Actually state what sort of work they’re hiring for in the job announcement. If you’re looking for somebody to take on all of your electronic records management and preservation duties (and do basic library instruction on the side), don’t make out that the job is an archival processing position with some incidental other tasks, ’cause that ain’t really what you’re hiring for.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Get rid of those stupid application questions that basically require applicants to type out information that is provided in cover letters and resumes anyway.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I think it comes down to how one presents oneself, how diligent one is in seeking out job opportunities, and whether one can find a place that fits one’s skills and personality.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Archives, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Public, School, Southern US

Write the Sweetest Rejection Letters

Eerste Wereldoorlog, luchtoorlogThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is not currently employed, has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for More than 18 months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Public libraries, and Special libraries, at the following levels: Entry level. This job hunter is in a rural area in the Western US and is willing to move to the Eastern US.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Congenial working conditions
salary & benefits
professional development

Where do you look for open positions?

Alerts from particular employers
ALA joblist
INALJ
SLA
USAjobs

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√  No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I review and reread the job posting several times. I consider whether I have a reasonable “argument,” that I am a candidate for the job. I consider how to address weak spots. I review my resume and tweak it if I need to. I write a cover letter. Then I go online and complete the application. It takes 2-8 hours.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Simplify and clarify the job posting. It’s easier for a candidate to determine whether they’d be a good fit that way. Some of the job postings I’ve seen want a candidate to do everything and be qualified for everything. I’ve seen job postings offering ten dollars an hour and requiring years of experience for a person who will do everything, even walk the dog. It’s just crazy.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

More communication. Write the sweetest rejection letters. I wish employers would be more honest. Sometimes I know that is not possible, but I would like to know if the interview process is a charade (that is, they already have someone in mind) or if I actually have a chance.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Knowing people before the job posting.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Job hunter's survey, Public, Rural area, Special, Western US

Why Is the Position Vacant?

The finish of the duck hunt at the New Zealand Division water sports, World War I, 7 Jul 1917

This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is not currently employed, has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Less than six months. This person is looking in Academic libraries and Public libraries at the following levels: Department Head, Senior Librarian, Branch Manager, and Director/Dean. This job hunter is in a rural area in the Southern US and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. Respect
2. A chance to use my talents
3. Interesting

Where do you look for open positions?

INALJ!
Also state library websites,Library Job Postings on the Internet, networking, and friends who are not librarians.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I have a basic resume that I use for most jobs and a specialized one that I use for the few jobs that I have special expertise in. I have slightly different sets of references for different positions as well, although two or three are always the same.
Anywhere from 15 minutes to several days. It depends on what is asked for.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Being able to present
√ Other: Being asked if I have any questions

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be upfront about the job duties and situation. Why is the position vacant? Exactly what do they want or expect from an employee? List the salary range. Benefits are not important to mention unless there is something unusual (no insurance, no retirement, or limited vacation time.)
Absolutely do not use words like dynamic, innovative, or creative. These phrases make me tired just to read them and are a real turn-off. Words like experienced or versatile are acceptable.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Communicate clearly with the candidate. Schedules are always nice. Designate a point person for contact.
Let the candidate know if they did not get the job. Email is just fine for this. I have done a lot of hiring in my time – we set up a generic email to send out instead of mailing typed letters. We did this when we started getting 70 or 80 applicants for positions. We did send letters to the few people without emails but it streamlined the process while still making sure people were contacted.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Convincing the hiring committee that you are the best candidate!
Following the instructions in the application process and being unfailingly polite. Figuring out what is wanted is essential as well but can be a matter of luck. Researching the library is helpful but can backfire if they want to control information. (I have had interviews where people obviously did not realize how much information was available online and were disconcerted when I inadvertently mentioned something.)

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

How do you decide which positions to apply for? (The grapevine is very important also when deciding which positions to apply for, as is background research.)

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Job hunter's survey, Public, Rural area, Southern US

If They Are Going to Weed Out Potential Employees by Their Resumes Anyway, Don’t Expect Every Applicant to Write a Paper or Essay

Rabbit hunting on the Otago Central Railway, ca 1900This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently employed (even if part-time or in an unrelated field), has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for More than 18 months. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Public libraries, and School libraries at the following levels: Requiring at least two years of experience. S/he is in a city/town in the Southern US and is not willing to move.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Location
Hours
Opportunity for growth

Where do you look for open positions?

Local sites
LinkedIn
INALJ

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

4 hours

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

If they are going to weed out potential employees by their resumes anyway, don’t expect every applicant to write a paper or essay if you are not going to use them. It really wastes a lot of time for applicants. Please ask for those additional items only from people who make it past the first cut.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Knowing someone

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under Academic, City/town, Job hunter's survey, Southern US, Special

A Positive Work Environment

This interview is with Ta-Shire Tribbett, a library associate at the Thurgood Marshall Law Library , where Edgar Allen Poe lies buried in the courtyard. Ms. Tribbett is pursuing her life-long dream of becoming a librarian as a result of winning an IMLS scholarship to North Carolina Central University. She has been looking for a new position for six months to a year in academic and special libraries, at the following levels: Department Head, Senior Librarian, and Branch Manager. Ms. Tribbett is in an urban area, in the Northeastern US, and is willing to move anywhere. You can find her on LinkedIn here, or on Twitter @l8teebug.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Room for advancement
Opportunities for professional development
A positive work environment

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist, Indeed, LinkedIn, USA Jobs, Twitter

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I have a standard resume and cover letter and I tweak it according to the job description. I spend at least an hour making sure my information matches up with the requirements listed. I usually ask a friend to look over my application once before I turn it in.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Being taken out to meal
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be upfront about duties and expectations in the job listing.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Acknowledge receipt of materials, and I think they should let you know when you didn’t move to the next phase.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Flexibility and a great attitude.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

I read the prior poster’s short blurb, and I’m sorry you had to deal with a snarky attitude! I love INALJ as it keeps me updated with library culture and the nuances of the employment process. Keep up the good work!

*Referring to this post:
https://hiringlibrarians.com/2013/01/31/since-i-have-an-advanced-degree-ph-d-in-addition-to-the-lis-degree-i-am-pickier-than-most/

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

3 Comments

Filed under Job hunter's survey, Law Library, Special

Personality and fit. You can always learn the position but you can’t learn to be a better fit for a position or team.

January 30, 1907This anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is currently not employed, has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for Six months to a year. This person is looking in Academic libraries, Archives, at the following levels: Entry level, Requiring at least two years of experience, Supervisory, Department Head, Senior Librarian, Branch Manager, and Director/Dean. This job hunter is in a rural area in the Northeastern US and is willing to move anywhere.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Fit, satisfaction, money. I would really like to pay off my student loans before I die.

Where do you look for open positions?

Highered.com, ala job list, inalj.com, chronicle but they seem to be a bit snooty

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Research, research, research. Get your ducks in a row and remind your referees that they are listed as a referral. Have someone read what your writing.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

No

When would you like employers to contact you?

To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Give them an idea of the salary and cut the bs language. Tell them what they are going to be doing and stick with it.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

For the all day on sight interview, give the candidate some time to reflect before, during and after running the gambit.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Personality and fit. You can always learn the position but you can’t learn to be a better fit for a position or team. Personalities make a big difference.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

Honesty, more than ever I would like to see honesty in job ads and in interviews!

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Academic, Archives, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Rural area