Tag Archives: Northeastern United States (U.S. Census Bureau)

The Renaissance Person

This post originally appeared on February 17, 2013. We are posting a follow up with Ms. Schuldner in just a few minutes.
Dina Schuldner
Dina Schuldner is a recent graduate of Queens College, holding an MA and an MLS. She is an Adult Reference Librarian assisting in Young Adult and Children’s Services at  Mineola Memorial Library, in Nassau County, NY. Ms. Schuldner was hired within the last three months, but previously had been job hunting for less than six months, looking in public libraries for entry level positions. Here is what she has to say regarding her internship/volunteering experience:

As a paid library page at Mineola Memorial Library, also attending library school, I was permitted during my off hours to be trained by the librarians on the staff. During that time, I was taught computer systems, weeding, purchasing, reader’s advisory, programming, etc. I did that for about a year.

She is in a suburban area in the Northeastern US, and does not anticipate moving but will do if necessary. She is a member of ALA, RUSA, YALSA, ALSC, and NCLA (Nassau County Library Association).  She can be contacted on Twitter (@DinaSchuldner), or on LinkedIn.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Working in a public library, in the same county where I live, as a librarian.

Where do you look for open positions?

Professional Listserv, Nassau County Civil Service

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I have an online portfolio whose link I include on my resume, which I send via paper or email in response to job postings.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Other: In person

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Other: Determining what type of professional service I’m expected to provide.

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

“Best” means fitting the organization’s needs. Therefore, they should be specific in the job announcement about exactly what would be required of the librarian.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Allow the applicant to have some say in the time and day of the interview.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Being flexible enough to work in any environment with all types of personalities. The Renaissance person.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

A question you could ask is what interview styles candidates have experienced in their job search, and how they accommodated themselves to the interviewer in order to get the job they got.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Being a New Grad I Feel Better Applying to Jobs That Indicate They are a Place to Grow and Learn

This post originally appeared on March 10, 2013. Her year two follow up will post in just a few moments.
Neyda GilmanNeyda Gilman has a VERY recent MLIS, as her degree was conferred February 1st! Librarianship will be a second career, after working as a medical technologist for five years. She is a graduate reference assistant at the University at Buffalo’s Health Sciences Library  Ms. Gilman has been looking for less than six months, in academic libraries, archives, and special libraries, at the entry level. Here is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

I currently work part time at a library on campus. I have also done practicums at a public library, hospital library, and in a special collection. When my part time work ends soon I plan on continuing to volunteer there until I can find a job.

She is in a city/town, in the Northeastern US, and is willing to move anywhere, although

location is important so if I don’t think I could be happy living there I probably won’t take the job.

Ms. Gilman is a 2011 ALA Spectrum Scholar (MLA/NLM Scholar). You can learn more about her by visiting her e-portfolio or LinkedIn profile.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Type of library – I am interested in Academic (especially health sciences) or hospital

Location – I am looking nationwide (and Canada), but only apply to places in locations I think I would enjoy living

Mentorship/guidance – this is not necessary, but being a new grad I feel better applying to jobs that indicate they are a place to grow and learn

Where do you look for open positions?

Mostly indeed.com and ALA joblist. I also check MLA jobs and am on numerous listservs.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

 What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

One application will take at least a day, usually more, depending on what they want. I start with my resume or CV (whichever one they specify) since that is the easiest – I use a similar resume/CV for most applications and it doesn’t usually take long to customize it for the specific job. Next I work on my cover letter and this is that part that takes the longest. Last is compiling my list of references – I have a list of about ten people who have all agreed to be references and I choose from that list depending on the job. The exception to this is if the job wants an actual letter or form filled out; in these cases the first thing I do is contact my references.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

 When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

 How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Put the posting out in as many areas as possible. Don’t have too strict of requirements. Having a lot of preferred qualifications is good, but I get really discouraged when I don’t meet one qualification out of a long list of required qualifications. There have been jobs that I know I would be good at and would love doing, but didn’t apply because there was one or two qualifications that I didn’t fully meet.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Keep the lines of communication open. If I am not a top choice, fine but let me know. Even if I am still being considered but not in the first batch of interviewees I want to know where I stand.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I’ll let you know when I get a job. 🙂

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under City/town, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US

Be Mindful of How Stressful Interviews Are and Be Compassionate

Diana La Femina earned her MLS from Indiana University in 2007. She specialized in rare books librarianship and recently finished the M.Phil. program in Medieval Language, Literature, and Culture at Trinity College, Dublin. She is currently employed temporarily in an unrelated field and is searching for a professional position. She has been job hunting for more than 18 months, in academic libraries, archives, library vendors/service providers, public libraries, school libraries, special libraries, and

anywhere I think I can use my degree at all.

Ms. La Femina has been looking at the entry level, for positions requiring at least two years of experience, and

whatever I think I can argue being qualified for.

Here is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

My internships were fantastic, though I do wish I could have gotten more experience from them. If I could go back and do my degree program all over again, knowing how the job market would change just before December 2007,  I would spend even more time interning and volunteering. I’m trying to get as much volunteer work as I can find now to make up for it now. I just hope my efforts show.

Ms. La Femina is in a suburban area in the Northeastern US, and when asked if she is willing to move, says:

Very willing, but being able to depends on the position. I can’t relocate if the salary for a position won’t support such a move.

She describes herself as a Librarian Extraordinaire, Book Reviewer, and Tea Lover. You can see more about her professional qualifications, as well as her other endeavors, on LinkedIn here.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

1. Do I meet the qualifications, or can I justify applying for the position if I don’t?

2. Do the qualifications and requirements match the job description and pay? In other words, is there a disconnect between the candidate requested and the position being offered (are they asking for at least five years of experience when the position described is entry level).

3. Can I afford to relocate or exist on the salary listed? Surprisingly, not always.

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist, LinkedIn, INALJ, various college and university websites, HigherEdJobs.com, various libraries in specific cities, SLA, ACRL…so many places.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Other: I prefer to, even if it’s a broad range. I’m wary of postings that don’t list a salary range because it’s one of the ways I gauge what an employer wants of me. Especially if the position requires relocation, I need to know the salary range so I can know whether I could take the position if I got it.

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

It depends on the position, the detail in the job description, etc. Usually I’d say a couple of hours, less if I can work on an application without interruption. I just recently spent the better part of a week working on a cover letter that I’ll hopefully be able to use as a base in the future.

First I go through the job ad and pick out the major duties and requirements. Then, I make a list matching these to my experience. How can I show that I have the experience they’re looking for? After doing that and typing up a rough draft, I try to figure out where and how to explain what I can do for the employer and why I’m the best candidate.

I’m not sure if all of this works or not; I haven’t landed anything yet.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: Lied, no; exaggerated, perhaps. I FEEL like I’m exaggerating, but I also have a really hard time telling people how wonderful I am, so I think it’s more me selling myself. There’s a fine line.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

√ To follow-up after an interview

√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

√ Other: Tell me ANYTHING you can. It’s a common courtesy. I understand getting a form email when there are many applications, but acknowledgement is only polite and helps me gauge my job search.

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Other: Contact me any way you can. Choose whatever way is easiest for you, so long as you contact me.

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

√ Other: I want to know where I’ll be working, with whom I’ll be working, and what I’ll be doing. Salary details, benefits, and all else can be discussed after we’ve both determined that I’m a good fit for the position. (Again, a basic salary RANGE is important in the beginning, not the salary itself.)

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

List realistic requirements. Don’t set unrealistically-high requirements for an entry-level position. Also, look beyond the requirements and actually READ and LISTEN to the applicants. The best candidate has probably already applied, but it may not be obvious on paper at first glance.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Contact candidates. Let them know when you’ve decided they aren’t who you want soon after you decide. Also, interviews are stressful, especially when you’ve been rejected many times or have had a hard time getting an interview. You want to see how good a candidate is, not how nervous they can get. Be mindful of how stressful interviews are and be compassionate. Try to put the interviewee at ease. Give them the chance to shine. And DON’T dismiss a candidate outwardly even if you’ve done so mentally at any point in an interview. It’s extremely rude and you could very well be making a mistake.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

If you’ve figured it out, let me know.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Being a New Grad I Feel Better Applying to Jobs That Indicate They are a Place to Grow and Learn

Neyda GilmanNeyda Gilman has a VERY recent MLIS, as her degree was conferred February 1st! Librarianship will be a second career, after working as a medical technologist for five years. She is a graduate reference assistant at the University at Buffalo’s Health Sciences Library  Ms. Gilman has been looking for less than six months, in academic libraries, archives, and special libraries, at the entry level. Here is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

I currently work part time at a library on campus. I have also done practicums at a public library, hospital library, and in a special collection. When my part time work ends soon I plan on continuing to volunteer there until I can find a job.

She is in a city/town, in the Northeastern US, and is willing to move anywhere, although

location is important so if I don’t think I could be happy living there I probably won’t take the job.

Ms. Gilman is a 2011 ALA Spectrum Scholar (MLA/NLM Scholar). You can learn more about her by visiting her e-portfolio or LinkedIn profile.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Type of library – I am interested in Academic (especially health sciences) or hospital

Location – I am looking nationwide (and Canada), but only apply to places in locations I think I would enjoy living

Mentorship/guidance – this is not necessary, but being a new grad I feel better applying to jobs that indicate they are a place to grow and learn

Where do you look for open positions?

Mostly indeed.com and ALA joblist. I also check MLA jobs and am on numerous listservs.

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

 What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

One application will take at least a day, usually more, depending on what they want. I start with my resume or CV (whichever one they specify) since that is the easiest – I use a similar resume/CV for most applications and it doesn’t usually take long to customize it for the specific job. Next I work on my cover letter and this is that part that takes the longest. Last is compiling my list of references – I have a list of about ten people who have all agreed to be references and I choose from that list depending on the job. The exception to this is if the job wants an actual letter or form filled out; in these cases the first thing I do is contact my references.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

 When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ To follow-up after an interview
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

 How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Put the posting out in as many areas as possible. Don’t have too strict of requirements. Having a lot of preferred qualifications is good, but I get really discouraged when I don’t meet one qualification out of a long list of required qualifications. There have been jobs that I know I would be good at and would love doing, but didn’t apply because there was one or two qualifications that I didn’t fully meet.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Keep the lines of communication open. If I am not a top choice, fine but let me know. Even if I am still being considered but not in the first batch of interviewees I want to know where I stand.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

I’ll let you know when I get a job. 🙂

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under City/town, Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US

You are What is Being Hired, Not the Paper Degree, Not the Fancy Outfits

DylaneFinkFaceDylane Fink is an MLIS grad student at Wayne State University, expecting to finish in summer 2013. Her very first job was as a library page, and she says:

after being teased that I would come back to run the library (and always brushing it off) I realized that the library field was the one for me

Ms. Fink is currently an assistant in a school library and hopes to continue working as a teacher librarian in some capacity. She has been looking for a new position for six months to a year, in Public libraries, School libraries, and Special libraries, for positions at the entry level, requiring at least two years of experience, and above entry level but below management. Here is how she describes her internship/volunteering experience:

In addition to about 9 years of paid library experience I interned at a local college library as part of my undergraduate program.
I worked with the archives department helping to compile data needed for a proposal. The library is looking to digitize a large portion of their archives and needed extensive data on the physical state of their pieces.
I also researched a fascinating topic from the early years of the school while going through the archive pieces.

Ms. Fink is in a rural area of the Northeastern US, and is willing to move anywhere. Her webpage is a work in progress but please feel free to take a look around: http://dylanefink.weebly.com/

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Relevance to interests/passions.

Potential for longevity.

Location of the job/library.

Where do you look for open positions?

ALA Joblist

LITA

Local county library postings

Several state Library Association Joblines

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

Generally I read and reread the description and requirements to decide if I have what it takes to be a candidate. I look over my resume to beef up or take away things that wouldn’t be relevant to the particular position.

Filling out the actual application tends to be tedious however some time is spent ensuring that all phone numbers, contact points and references are accurate. The cover letter is where I spend the majority of my time and effort to really give potential employers an understanding of who I am and why I would be an asset to the company.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ Other: I am always honest with job descriptions, information, time spent, education, etc. however I may enhance a position title to better fit the job I did..for example my current position has me as an “instructional assistant” however I tend to think “Media Center Assistant” better summarizes my actual position.

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage

√ To follow-up after an interview

√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Phone for good news, email for bad news

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers

√ Other: being given a true description of the position, perhaps by someone currently in the role

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be upfront and honest about the depth of responsibility in the job and what assets they are looking for in a candidate. Reach out to those who may have less education but extensive experience.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

The wait is what hurts the most, waiting to hear if you are offered an interview, waiting to hear if they want an additional interview or if you have been selected. Finding a way to expedite the process would be appreciated.

 I know this is not always possible as many positions are filled by county policy/governing body guidelines and timetables.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Be yourself and be confident in what you are selling. You are what is being hired, not the paper degree, not the fancy outfits. Show employers what you can bring to the table and how you can be a vital member of their company. Make them want you, your ideas and your plans.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one?  Check it out!

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Rural area

The Renaissance Person

Dina Schuldner
Dina Schuldner is a recent graduate of Queens College, holding an MA and an MLS. She is an Adult Reference Librarian assisting in Young Adult and Children’s Services at  Mineola Memorial Library, in Nassau County, NY. Ms. Schuldner was hired within the last three months, but previously had been job hunting for less than six months, looking in public libraries for entry level positions. Here is what she has to say regarding her internship/volunteering experience:

As a paid library page at Mineola Memorial Library, also attending library school, I was permitted during my off hours to be trained by the librarians on the staff. During that time, I was taught computer systems, weeding, purchasing, reader’s advisory, programming, etc. I did that for about a year.

She is in a suburban area in the Northeastern US, and does not anticipate moving but will do if necessary. She is a member of ALA, RUSA, YALSA, ALSC, and NCLA (Nassau County Library Association).  She can be contacted on Twitter (@DinaSchuldner), or on LinkedIn.

What are the top three things you’re looking for in a job?

Working in a public library, in the same county where I live, as a librarian.

Where do you look for open positions?

Professional Listserv, Nassau County Civil Service

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ Yes, and it’s a red flag when it’s not

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

I have an online portfolio whose link I include on my resume, which I send via paper or email in response to job postings.

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

√ To acknowledge my application

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Other: In person

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Other: Determining what type of professional service I’m expected to provide.

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

“Best” means fitting the organization’s needs. Therefore, they should be specific in the job announcement about exactly what would be required of the librarian.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Allow the applicant to have some say in the time and day of the interview.

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Being flexible enough to work in any environment with all types of personalities. The Renaissance person.

Do you have any comments, or are there any other questions you think we should add to this survey?

A question you could ask is what interview styles candidates have experienced in their job search, and how they accommodated themselves to the interviewer in order to get the job they got.

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

Leave a comment

Filed under Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Suburban area

When I See a Long Grocery List of Exaggerated Required Skills, I Walk Away

Hunting Party at Norderhamn beach near the Cave of Stora Förvar, Stora Karlsö, Gotland, SwedenThis anonymous interview is with a job hunter who is not currently employed, has not been hired within the last two months, and has been looking for a new position for more than 18 months. This person is looking in Academic, Public, and Special libraries, at the entry level. Here is this person’s experience with internships/volunteering:

several years as a volunteer reference librarian and reference administrator at the ipl2, collection development internship at the ipl2, volunteer experience at several school libraries

This job hunter is in a rural area, in the Northeastern US, and is not willing to move.

Where do you look for open positions?

INAlJ, listservs,organization web sites, professsional association web sites (e.g. AALL, NJLA)

Do you expect to see salary range listed in a job ad?

√ No (even if I might think it *should* be)

What’s your routine for preparing an application packet? How much time do you spend on it?

typically many hours

Have you ever stretched the truth, exaggerated, or lied on your resume, or at some other point during the hiring process?

√ No

When would you like employers to contact you?

To acknowledge my application
√ To tell me if I have or have not been selected to move on to the interview stage
√ Once the position has been filled, even if it’s not me

How do you prefer to communicate with potential employers?

√ Email

Which events during the interview/visit are most important to your assessment of the position (i.e. deciding if you want the job)?

√ Tour of facility
√ Meeting department members/potential co-workers
√ Meeting with HR to talk about benefits/salary

What do you think employers should do to get the best candidates to apply?

Be clear and *realistic* about your needs for the position. I’ve seen too many ads for library clerk positions, at a clerical salary, listing qualifications one would normally expect from a professional librarian. I’ve also seen professional positions where the list of requirements is just ridiculous. We all know that it’s an employer’s market out there and that realistically most librarians will fill many roles in their organization. But do you really need an MLS, a PhD in computer science, 5 years of experience with the exact OPAC used by this library, and be fluent in Mandarin Chinese to do a good job in this position? I’m exaggerating for effect of course, but when I see a long grocery list of exaggerated required skills, I walk away.

What should employers do to make the hiring process less painful?

Communicate! I am left with a bad taste in my mouth when I spend hours and hours putting together an application packet that is tailored to a particular job position and I do not receive any acknowledgment. A form letter acknowledging receipt and letting me know I will be contacted if they are interested in interviewing me is sufficient. Be polite – it does not take that much effort. When I don’t receive any acknowledgment at all, I tend to revise my opinion of the organization – and not in a good way!

What do you think is the secret to getting hired?

Networking

This survey was co-authored by Naomi House from I Need A Library Job – Do you need one? Check it out!

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Filed under Job hunter's survey, Northeastern US, Rural area